Edward H. Hume

Dr. Edward H. Hume (1876–1957) devoted much of his long and vigorous life to working in China and elsewhere in the cause of health care and medical training.  He graduated from Yale College in 1897, and received his medical degree four years later from Johns Hopkins University.  He worked in India from 1903 to 1905 before going to China, where he founded the Xiangya School of Medicine and Xiangya Hospital (previously known as the Hsiang-ya Medical School and Hospital) under the auspices of the Yale-China Association (previously named Yale-in-China) in Changsha.

Dr. Hume served as President of the Colleges of Yale-in-China from 1923 to 1927.  He returned to the United States but was recalled to China in 1934 to work for several years in liaison with the Chinese National Health Administration.  From 1937 until his retirement, Dr. Hume directed the Christian Medical Council for Overseas Work in New York City, and wrote a number of books about his medical work in China, including The Chinese Way in Medicine (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press, 1940) and Doctors East, Doctors West; an American Physician’s Life in China (New York,: Norton, 1946). Shortly after his death in 1957, funds from colleagues, friends, and family enabled the establishment of the Edward H. Hume Memorial Lectureship to bring to Yale eminent scholars of East Asian studies.

Edward H. Hume Memorial Lectures at Yale University

2016-17

You-tien Hsing, UC Berkeley

Surviving Conservation: Herders and Farmers in China’s Northwest

2015-16

Stephen Owen, Harvard University

Returning to the High Tang

2014-15

David Der-wei Wang, Harvard University

The Lyrical in Epic Time: The Stories of Shen Congwen and Feng Zhi

2013-14

Andrew Nathan, Columbia University

What Drives Chinese Foreign Policy: Vulnerability or Ambition?

2012-13               

Angela Leung, The University of Hong Kong 

Charity, Medicine, and Religion: The Quest for Modernity in Canton (ca, 1870-1937)

2011-12               

Ching Kwan Lee, UC Los Angeles

The ‘Labor Question’ of Chinese Capitalism in Africa

2010-11               

Rudolf Wagner, University of Heidelberg

Concepts on the Move Across Languages: Words, Metaphors, and Images for the Chinese State, 1800-1920

2009-10               

Timothy Brook, University of British Columbia

Forging Value: The Production of Luxury Commodities in Late Ming China

2008-09               

Susan Shirk, UC San Diego

The Information Revolution in China

2007-08               

Stephen F. Teiser, Princeton University

The Construction of Paradise in Chinese Buddhist Liturgies

2006-07               

Benjamin Elman, Princeton University

Bracketing [Modernity]: Reconsidering Sino-Japanese Cultural History, 1700 - 1850

2005-06               

David Shambaugh, George Washington University

Power Shift: China, the United States, and Regional Order in Asia

2004-05                

Kenneth Pomeranz, UC Irvine

Contesting the High Ground:  Mt. Tai and its Goddess in Late Imperial and Modern Chinese Society

2003-04               

Roderick MacFarquhar, Harvard University

China in Transition

2002-03               

Erik Zürcher, Professor Emeritus and Former General Director, Sinological Institute, University of Leiden

Integration and Alienation: The Two Faces of Christianity in Late Ming China

2001-02               

Göran Malmqvist, Emeritus Chair Professor of Sinology, Stockholm University

Reflections of a Retired European Sinologist

2000-01               

Robert P. Weller, Boston University

Night of the Living Fish: China and the Globalization of Nature

1999-00               

Susan Naquin, Princeton University

Rediscovering Old Peking

1998-99              

 Susan Mann, UC Davis

Ink, Brush, Man, Woman: Men’s Writings on Women in Qing Dynasty China

1997-98              

Pei-yi Wu, Columbia University

A Woman Warrior in 13th Century China

1996-97               

James Cahill, UC Berkeley

Towards a Remapping of Chinese Painting

1995-96               

Vivienne Shue, Cornell University

Post-Socialist Poor Relief: Statism, Social Hierarchy, and Chinese Family Values

1994-95               

Richard P. Madsen, UC San Diego

The World of God: Catholicism and Civil Society in China

1993-94               

James Watson, Harvard University

Reinventing the Clan in Post-Mao China: The Wen Tian-Xiang Connection (Hong Kong, Guangdong, Jianxi)

1992-93               

Albert Feuerwerker, University of Michigan

The Question(s) of China’s Twentieth-Century History

1991-92               

Joseph W. Esherick, UC San Diego

Revolution in the Hinterland

1990-91               

Perry Link, Princeton University

Politics and the Chinese Language

1989-90               

Elizabeth J. Perry, University of Washington

The Politics of Labor in Modern China

1988-89               

Benjamin I. Schwartz, Harvard University

Western Categories and Chinese Thought: The Case of Individualism

1987-88              

Frederic Wakeman, UC Berkeley

Memoirs of the Shanghai Station — Dai Li’s Secret Service Among the Barbarians

1986-87               

Charlotte Furth, California State University at Long Beach

Medicine, Gender, and the Status of Women in Late Imperial China

1985-86               

Ezra Vogel, Harvard University

The New Challenge from Japan

1984-85               

Arthur Kleinman, Harvard University

The Social Forces of Mental Illness in China

1983-84               

Howard S. Hibbett, Harvard University

Wit Within Walls: Satire in Edo Fiction

1982-83               

Phillip A. Kuhn, Harvard University

Political Development: Is There a Chinese Approach?

1981-82               

Harry D. Harootunian, University of Chicago

Realms Visible & Invisible, Things Seen & Unseen: Japan’s Modernity & the Transformation of Nativism

1980-81               

Nathan Sivin, University of Pennsylvania

Why the Scientific Revolution Did Not Take Place in China or Did It?

1979-80               

Robert J. Smith, Cornell University

Japanese Village Women: Suye Mura, 1935-36

1978-79               

Kwang-chih Chang, Harvard University

The Chinese Bronze Age: A Modern Synthesis

1977-78               

Edwin O. Reischauer, Harvard University

The Tokugawa Legacy in Modern Japan

1976-77               

Frederick W. Mote, Princeton University

Nanking in 1600

1975-76

Masao Maruyama

The Structure of ‘matsuri godo’ (matters governmental) in Ancient Japan

1974-75                

G. William Skinner, Stanford University

Family Structure and Politics in Modern China

1973-74               

John Rosenfield, Fogg Art Museum - Harvard University

Ink Painting in Japan

1972-73               

Lawrence Picken, Cambridge University

Music at the Tang Court

1971-72               

Robert Bellah, UC Berkeley

The Ethos of Japanese Fascism:  A Comparative View

1970-71               

Ronald Dore, University of Sussex

The Importance of Educational Tradition: Japan and Elsewhere

1969-70               

Ping-ti Ho, University of Chicago

The Chinese Civilization:  An Inquiry into the Roots of its Longevity

1968-69              

Peng-yoke Ho, University of Malaya

The System of the Book of Changes and Chinese Science

1967-68               

Marius Jansen, Princeton University

Meiji Restoration

1966-67               

Denis Twitchett, University of London

Commerce in Medieval China

1965-66               

Robert E. Ward, University of Michigan

Political Development: The Case of Japan

1964-65               

Herbert Franke, University of Munich

Sino-Western Contacts under the Mongol Empire

1963-64               

Joseph Levenson, UC Berkeley

Curators & Creators:  Chinese Tradition in the Present Age

1962-63        

Donald Keene, Columbia University

Realism and Unreality in Japanese Drama

1961-62               

Alexander Soper, Bryn Mawr College

1960-61

John K. Fairbank, Harvard University