Sarah LeBaron von Baeyer

Sarah LeBaron von Baeyer's picture
Lecturer in East Asian Studies (August 2016 - May 2017)
Areas of interest : 
Transnational Migration and Mobility; Race and Ethnicity; Minorities in Japan
Region: 
Japan, Transregional

Sarah LeBaron von Baeyer completed her PhD in sociocultural anthropology at Yale University in 2015. Her research focuses on the experiences of different generations of Japanese-Brazilian labor migrants moving between Japan and Brazil over the last three decades. She has also worked as an applied anthropologist, and has recently completed a project on education and technology use among Syrian refugee children in Jordan.

Courses

ANTH 254

Japan: Culture, Society, Modernity

Introduction to Japanese society and culture. The historical development of Japanese society; family, work, and education in contemporary Japan; Japanese aesthetics; and psychological, sociological, and cultural interpretations of Japanese behavior.

Term: Fall 2016
Day/Time: T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
ANTH 287

Minorities in Japan

Study of the many ways in which Japan is in fact heterogeneous and diverse, from the long established ethnic minorities such as Okinawans and Zainichi Koreans, to more recent immigrants such as Nikkei-Brazilians and Filipino/as, to the less commonly studied groups such as career women; sexual and religious minorities; and people faced with disability, economic disadvantage, and mental illness.

Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: T, Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
ANTH 304

Transnational Migration and East Asia

Exploration of key anthropological and sociological approaches to transnational migration to/from East Asia in the current era of intensified globalization. Consideration of: migration within, and to East Asia, including labor migration to South Korea and African Pentecostal migration to China; ethnic communities in Japan such as the Koreans and recent migrant arrivals such as the Filipinos, Nepalese, and Brazilians; and current global migrations from/out of East Asia, including Chinese migrants in both South Africa and Brazil and Koreans in the United States.

Term: Fall 2016
Day/Time: T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM