CEAS Courses 2014-2015

This list is subject to modification.

Some of the information contained here may have changed since the time of publication. Always check with the department under which the course is listed or on the official Yale Online Course Information website to make sure that the courses you are interested in are still being offered and that the times have not changed. Course information is also available on the Yale Blue Book website.

If you have questions about any of the courses listed here, please contact the offering department directly.

ANTH 214

Body and Gender in China since the Late 19th Century

Susan Brownell
T, Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

The gendered body in China from the late nineteenth century to the present. The effects of social change on concepts of health, sports, beauty, femininity, masculinity, and sexuality; the shift from socialism to consumerism and its influence on ideas about the body, sexuality, and gender; Chinese traditional medicine and martial arts as alternative body cultures in relation to Western biomedicine and sports; the government-led push for Olympic gold medals.

China

ANTH 234 , WGSS 234

Disability and Culture

Karen Nakamura
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Exploration of disability from a cross-cultural perspective, using examples from around the globe. Disability as it relates to identity, culture, law, and politics. Case studies may include deafness in Japan, wheelchair mobility in the United States, and mental illness in the former Soviet republics.

Permission of instructor required. This course meets during reading period.

Japan, Transregional

ANTH 254

Japan: Culture, Society, Modernity

William Kelly
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

Introduction to Japanese society and culture. The historical development of Japanese society; family, work, and education in contemporary Japan; Japanese aesthetics; and psychological, sociological, and cultural interpretations of Japanese behavior.

Japan

ANTH 326, ARCG 326

Ancient Civilizations of the Eurasian Steppes

William Honeychurch
Th 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Examination of peoples of the steppe zone that stretches from Eastern Europe to Mongolia. Overview of what archaeologists know about Eurasian steppe societies, with emphasis on the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron, and medieval ages. Attention both to material culture and to historical sources. Topics range from the domestication of the horse to Genghis Khan’s world empire, including the impact these events had on neighboring civilizations in Europe and Asia.

Permission of instructor required.

Transregional, Mongolia

ANTH 342

Cultures and Markets in Asia

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Historical and contemporary movements of people, goods, and cultural meanings that have defined Asia as a region. Reexamination of state-centered conceptualizations of Asia and of established boundaries in regional studies. The intersections of transregional institutions and local societies and their effects on trading empires, religious traditions, colonial encounters, and cultural fusion. Finance flows that connect East Asia and the Indian Ocean to the Middle East and Africa. The cultures of capital and market in the neoliberal and postsocialist world.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

ANTH 345

Cultural Performance in Modern East Asia

Susan Brownell
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

The history and anthropology of organized cultural events in East Asia from the early twentieth century to the present. The relationship between globalization and international events such as the Olympic Games and world’s fairs; global, national, regional, and local levels in a ritual system. Research methodologies for studying and interpreting cultural performance; theories of mega-event, media event, spectacle, festival, and ritual; concepts of public diplomacy, national image, city branding, and soft power.

Permission of the instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

ANTH 362

Unity and Diversity in Chinese Culture

Helen Siu
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

An exploration of the Chinese identity as it has been reworked over the centuries. Major works in Chinese anthropology and their intellectual connections with general anthropology and historical studies. Topics include kinship and marriage, marketing systems, rituals and popular religion, ethnicity and state making, and the cultural nexus of power.

Permission of instructor required.

China

ANTH 397, ARCG 397

Archaeology of East Asia

Anne Underhill
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the findings and practice of archaeology in China, Japan, Korea, and southeast Asia. Methods used by archaeologists to interpret social organization, economic organization, and ritual life. Attention to major transformations such as the initial peopling of an area, establishment of farming villages, the development of cities, interregional interactions, and the nature of political authority.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, Southeast Asia

ANTH 541, F&ES 836, HIST 965, PLSC 779

Agrarian Societies: Culture, Society, History, and Development

An interdisciplinary examination of agrarian societies, contemporary and historical, Western and non-Western. Major analytical perspectives from anthropology, economics, history, political science, and environmental studies are used to develop a meaning-centered and historically grounded account of the transformations of rural society.

Team Taught

China, Transregional, South Asia

ANTH 542

Cultures and Markets: Asia Connected through Time and Space

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Historical and contemporary movement of people, goods, and cultural meanings that have connected an Asian region spanning East Asia, Indian Ocean, Middle East, and Africa. The course rethinks state-centered and land-based perspectives by highlighting the dynamism in multiethnic commercial nodes, port cities, and transregional institutions, and their impact on local societies. It focuses on agents of trade, colonial encounters, diverse religious traditions, and global finance flows. It examines the cultures of capital and market in the age of empires, the neoliberal and postsocialist worlds.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

ANTH 545

Cultural Performance in Modern East Asia

Susan Brownell
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

The history and anthropology of organized cultural events in East Asia from the early twentieth century to the present. The relationship between globalization and international events such as the Olympic Games and world’s fairs; global, national, regional, and local levels in a ritual system. Research methodologies for studying and interpreting cultural performance; theories of mega-event, media event, spectacle, festival, and ritual; concepts of public diplomacy, national image, city branding, and soft power.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

ANTH 562

Unity and Diversity in Chinese Culture and Society

Helen Siu
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

An exploration of the Chinese identity as it has been reworked over the centuries. Major works in Chinese anthropology and their intellectual connections with general anthropology and historical studies. Topics include kinship and marriage, marketing systems, rituals and popular religion, ethnicity and state making, and the cultural nexus of power.

China

ANTH 726, ARCG 726

Ancient Civilizations of the Eurasian Steppes

William Honeychurch
Th 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Peoples of the steppe zone, stretching from Eastern Europe to Mongolia, have played a pivotal role in Old World prehistory, though much about their societies and lifeways is still shrouded in mystery. The archaeology of this macro-region has developed rapidly since the 1990s, and this course presents an overview of major topics and debates in the region based on what archaeologists currently know about Eurasian steppe societies of the past.

Transregional, Mongolia

ANTH 797, ARCG 797

Archaeology of East Asia

Anne Underhill
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the findings and practice of archaeology in China, Japan, Korea, and southeast Asia. Methods used by archaeologists to interpret social organization, economic organization, and ritual life. Attention to major transformations such as the initial peopling of an area, establishment of farming villages, the development of cities, interregional interactions, and the nature of political authority.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, Southeast Asia

ANTH 941

Research Seminar in Japan Anthropology

The seminar offers professional preparation for doctoral students in Japan anthropology through systematic readings and analysis of the anthropological literature, in English and in Japanese.

Permission of the instructor required.

Japan

ANTH 941

Research Seminar in Japan Anthropology

The seminar offers professional preparation for doctoral students in Japan anthropology through systematic readings and analysis of the anthropological literature, in English and in Japanese.

Permission of the instructor required.

Japan

ARCH 3264

“Micro” in Japanese Architecture and Urbanism

Sunil Bald
HTBA
Spring

This seminar focuses on recent trends in Japanese architecture and design culture over the past twenty years that developed since the bursting of the bubble economy and the architectural excess it enabled. The course looks at architectural, urban, and aesthetic concepts that embrace the diminutive. Topics include the contemporary Japanese house, micro-urbanism, return to nature movements, and concepts of both the cute and monstrous. These are explored through a series of lenses that engage tradition, pragmatism, sustainability, gender, and nationalism. The seminar requires readings and class discussion as well as an independent research project that culminates in a presentation and a paper.

Limited enrollment.

Japan

ARCH 3265

Architecture and Urbanism in Modern Japan

Yoko Kawai
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This course examines how design philosophies and methodologies were developed in Japanese architecture during the 130-year period from the Meiji Restoration until the postmodern era. Special attention is paid to the process of urbanization through repeated destructions and the forming of cultural identity through mutual interactions with the West, both of which worked as major forces that shaped architectural developments. Highlighted architects include Chuta Ito, Goichi Takeda, Frank Lloyd Wright, Kameki Tsuchiura, Sutemi Horiguchi, Kunio Maekawa, Kenzo Tange, Arata Isozaki, Fumihiko Maki, Kisho Kurokawa, Kazuo Shinohara, Tadao Ando, and Mirei Shigemori. Historical photos and excerpts from films are used to better understand context. Students are required to make in-class presentations and write a final paper.

Limited enrollment.

Japan

ARCH 341, LAST 318

Globalization Space

Keller Easterling
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Infrastructure space as a primary medium of change in global polity. Networks of trade, energy, communication, transportation, spatial products, finance, management, and labor, as well as new strains of political opportunity that reside within their spatial disposition. Case studies include free zones and automated ports around the world, satellite urbanism in South Asia, high-speed rail in Japan and the Middle East, agripoles in southern Spain, fiber optic submarine cable in East Africa, spatial products of tourism in North Korea, and management platforms of the International Organization for Standardization.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

ARCH 4216, F&ES 782

Globalization Space

Keller Easterling
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

This lecture course researches global infrastructures as a medium of transnational polity. Lectures visit the networks of trade, communication, tourism, labor, air, rail, highway, oil, hydrology, finance, and activism. Case studies travel around the world to, for instance, free trade zones in Dubai, IT campuses in South Asia, high-speed rail in Saudi Arabia, cable/satellite networks in Africa, highways in India, a resort in the DPRK, golf courses in China, oil-financed development in Sudan, and automated ports. These investigations begin in transnational territory where new infrastructure consortia operate in parallel to or in partnership with nations. Not only an atlas or survey of physical networks and shared protocols, the course also considers their pervasive and long-term effects on polity and culture. Infrastructures may constitute a de facto parliament of global decision making or an intensely spatial extra statecraft. Each week, readings, with both evidence and discursive commentary, accompany two lectures and a discussion section. A short midterm paper establishes each student’s research question for the term. A longer final paper completes the requirements of the course.

Limited enrollment.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

CHNS 110

Elementary Modern Chinese I

Min Chen, Rongzhen Li, Jianhua Shen, Yu-Lin Saussy, Shucheng Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Intended for students with no background in Chinese. An intensive course with emphasis on spoken language and drills. Pronunciation, grammatical analysis, conversation practice, and introduction to reading and writing Chinese characters.

Credit only on completion of CHNS 120b. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 120

Elementary Modern Chinese II

Min Chen, Rongzhen Li, Jianhua Shen, Yu-Lin Saussy, Shucheng Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 110.

After CHNS 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 130

Intermediate Modern Chinese I

Ninghui Liang, Ling Mu, Chuanmei Sun
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An intermediate course that continues intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and consolidates achievements from the first year of study. Students improve oral fluency, study more complex grammatical structures, and enlarge both reading and writing vocabulary.

After CHNS 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 132

Elementary Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners I

Fan Liu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

First level of the advanced learner sequence, intended for students with some aural proficiency but limited ability in reading and writing Chinese. Training in listening and speaking, with emphasis on reading and writing.

Placement confirmed by placement test and by instructor. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 140

Intermediate Modern Chinese II

Ninghui Liang, Ling Mu, Chuanmei Sun
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 130. To be followed by CHNS 150.

After CHNS 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 142

Elementary Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners II

Fan Liu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 132.

After CHNS 132 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 150

Advanced Modern Chinese I

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Haiwen Wang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Third level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Use of audiovisual materials, oral presentations, skits, and longer and more frequent writing assignments to assimilate more sophisticated grammatical structures. Further introduction to a wide variety of written forms and styles. Use of both traditional and simplified forms of Chinese characters.

After CHNS 140 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 151

Advanced Modern Chinese II

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Haiwen Wang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 PM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 150.

After CHNS 150 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 152

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate to advanced oral proficiency and high elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them.

After CHNS 142 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 153

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate to advanced oral proficiency and high elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them.

After CHNS 142 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 154

Advanced Modern Chinese III

William Zhou
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Fourth level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Readings in a wide range of subjects form the basis of discussion and other activities. Students consolidate their skills, especially speaking proficiency, at an advanced level. Materials use both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 151 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 155

Advanced Modern Chinese IV

William Zhou
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 154.

After CHNS 154 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 162

Advanced Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Wei Su
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Third level of the advanced learner sequence in Chinese. Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills (able to conduct conversations fluently) and with high intermediate reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000–1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 153 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 163

Advanced Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Wei Su
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Third level of the advanced learner sequence in Chinese. Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills (able to conduct conversations fluently) and with high intermediate reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000-1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 153 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 164

Readings in Contemporary Chinese Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Selected readings in Chinese fiction of the 1980s and 1990s. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 165

Readings in Modern Chinese Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Reading and discussion of modern short stories, most written prior to 1949. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 166

Chinese Media and Society

William Zhou
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on speaking and writing skills. Issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as newspapers, radio, television, and Internet blogs.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 167

Chinese Media and Society

William Zhou
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on speaking and writing skills. Issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as newspapers, radio, television, and Internet blogs.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 168

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Shucheng Zhang
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 169

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Shucheng Zhang
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 170

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, CHNS 153, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 171

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 170.

After CHNS 170. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 570

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, 153 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 571

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 570.

After CHNS 570 or equivalent.

China

EALL 200, HUMS 432

The Chinese Tradition

Tina Lu
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

An introduction to the literature, culture, and thought of premodern China, from the beginnings of the written record to the turn of the twentieth century. Close study of textual and visual primary sources, with attention to their historical and cultural backdrops.

No knowledge of Chinese required.

China

EALL 211, WGSS 405

Women and Literature in Traditional China

Kang-I Chang
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

A study of major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. The power of women’s writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; footbinding; notions of love and death; the aesthetics of illness; women and revolution; poetry clubs; the function of memory in women’s literature; problems of gender and genre.

Permission of instructor required. All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese. Formerly CHNS 201.

China

EALL 217

Chinese Informal Prose

Tina Lu
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Translation and discussion of classical essays: first, models of guwen (ancient-style prose) from the Tang and Song dynasties, and second, the transformation of these models in the late Ming and early Qing into xiaopin (“lesser works”). Guwen as a choice both for philosophical and speculative writing and for describing the minutiae of everyday life.

Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 236, HUMS 435, LITR 181

Japanese Poetry and Poetics

Edward Kamens
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Core concepts and traditions of classical Japanese poetry explored through the medium of translation. Readings from anthologies and treatises of the ninth through early twentieth centuries. Attention to recent critical studies in transcultural poetic theory. Inspection and discussion of related artifacts in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library and the Yale University Art Gallery

Permission of instructor required. Readings and discussion in English.

Japan

EALL 248, LITR 254

Modern Chinese Literature

Jing Tsu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

An introduction to modern Chinese literature. Themes include cultural go-betweens; sensations in the body; sexuality; diaspora, translation, and nationalism; globalization and homeland; and everyday life.

No knowledge of Chinese required. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 255

Japanese Modernism

Seth Jacobowitz
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Japanese literature and art from the 1920s through the 1940s. The avant-garde and mass culture; popular genre fiction; the advent of new media technologies and techniques; effects of Japanese imperialism, militarism, and fascism on cultural production; experimental writers and artists and their resistance to, or complicity with, the state.

Japan

EALL 275, FILM 389, LITR 365

Crime in Japanese Film and Fiction

Aaron Gerow
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM, Screenings T 7:00 PM
Spring

The depiction of crime in Japanese film and fiction, with a focus on the detective and gangster genres. Social, historical, and aesthetic implications, as well as differences from Euro-American and Asian crime films.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 300

Sinological Methods

Pauline Lin
Th 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Spring

A research course in Chinese studies, designed for students with background in modern and literary Chinese. Exploration and evaluation of the wealth of primary sources and research tools available in Chinese. For native speakers of Chinese, introduction to the secondary literature in English and instruction in writing professionally in English on topics about China. Topics include the compilation and development of Chinese bibliographies; bibliophiles’ notes; editions, censorship, and textual variation and reliability; specialized dictionaries; maps and geographical gazetteers; genealogies and biographical sources; archaeological and visual materials; and major Chinese encyclopedias and compendia.

After CHNS 171 or equivalent. Formerly CHNS 202. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 303

Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Fundamentals of classical Chinese poetry and poetics. Readings vary from year to year; topics include poetry and history, intertextuality, and poetic reception.

Permission of instructor required. Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. Formerly CHNS 303. After CHNS 171 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

China

EALL 325

Chinese Poetic Form, 1490-1990

Kang-I Chang
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Development of the classical Chinese poetic form by modern Chinese poets. The appeal and aesthetic concept of the classical form since the revivalist movement of the late fifteenth century. Emphasis on close critical reading, with attention to cultural and political contexts.

Permission of instructor required. Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. Prerequisite: a literary Chinese course or permission of instructor.

China

EALL 357

Meiji Literature and Visual Culture

Seth Jacobowitz
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Introduction to the literature and visual culture of Meiji Japan (1868–1912), including novels, poetry, calligraphy, woodblock prints, painting, photography, and cinema. The relationship between theories and practices of fine art and literature; changes in word and image relations; transformations from woodblock to movable-type print culture; the invention of photography and early forms of cinematic practice.

Permission of instructor required. No knowledge of Japanese required.

Japan

EALL 511, WGSS 770

Women and Literature in Traditional China

Kang-I Chang
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

This course focuses on major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. Topics include the power of women’s writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; the cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; foot binding and its implications; women’s notion of love and death; the aesthetic of illness; women and revolution; women’s poetry clubs; the function of memory in women’s literature; problems of gender and genre.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese.

China

EALL 517

Chinese Informal Prose

Tina Lu
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Translation and discussion of classical essays: first, models of guwen (ancient-style prose) from the Tang and Song dynasties, and second, the transformation of these models in the late Ming and early Qing into xiaopin (“lesser works”). Guwen as a choice both for philosophical and speculative writing and for describing the minutiae of everyday life.

China

EALL 536

Japanese Poetry and Poetics

Edward Kamens
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Core concepts of traditional poetics studied through selections from anthologies and treatises from the ninth to the early twentieth century, alongside many critical studies, with reference to transcultural poetic theories. Special attention to related artifacts in Yale collections.

No knowledge of Japanese required.

Japan

EALL 548

Modern Chinese Literature

Jing Tsu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

An introduction to modern Chinese literature. Topics include Sinophone studies, East Asian diaspora, theories of comparison, technologies of writing and new literacies, realism, translation, globalization, scientism, and culture.

China

EALL 555

Japanese Modernism

Seth Jacobowitz
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

This course surveys Japanese literature, art, and mass culture of the interwar period (1920s–1940s). We consider various topics such as the cultural logic of “erotic, grotesque, nonsense”; the popularity of the detective novel; the rise of the “modern girl”; changing representations of the city; and the meanings and contexts of modernism. Readings include novels by Tanizaki Junichiro, Kawabata Yasunari, and Edogawa Rampo; avant-garde poetry by Hagiwara Sakutaro; and modernist art by the Mavo collective and the erstwhile School of Paris contributor Foujita Tsuguharu.

Japan

EALL 575, FILM 680

Crime in Japanese Film and Fiction

Aaron Gerow
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM, Screenings M 7:00 PM
Spring

The depiction of crime in Japanese film and fiction, with a focus on the detective and gangster genres. Social, historical, and aesthetic implications, as well as differences from Euro-American and Asian crime films.

Japan

EALL 600

Sinological Methods

Pauline Lin
Th 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Spring

A research course in Chinese studies, designed for students with background in modern and literary Chinese. Exploration and evaluation of the wealth of primary sources and research tools available in Chinese. For native speakers of Chinese, introduction to the secondary literature in English and instruction in writing professionally in English on topics about China. Topics include the compilation and development of Chinese bibliographies; bibliophiles’ notes; editions, censorship, and textual variation and reliability; specialized dictionaries; maps and geographical gazetteers; genealogies and biographical sources; archaeological and visual materials; and major Chinese encyclopedias and compendia.

China

EALL 603

Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Focus on fundamentals of classical Chinese poetry and poetics. Topics include poetry and cultural history, intertextuality, poetics of lyricism, etc.

Because readings are different each year, this course may be repeated for credit. Readings in Chinese, discussion in English. After CHNS 571 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

China

EALL 625

The Classical Chinese Poetic Form and Its Modern Transformation, 1490–1990

Kang-I Chang
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

What is the appeal and the aesthetic concept of the Classical Chinese poetic form, which began in classical antiquity and continued to serve as a primary medium for poetic expression in modern times? How did modern writers express their “new” voices by using this “old” form? The seminar traces the “modern” development of Chinese classical poetry from the Revivalist (fugu) movement of the Ming to contemporary China in Shanghai. Emphasis on critical close reading, with attention to cultural and political contexts. Baihua translations and notes are provided for most of the poems.

Primary readings in Chinese, discussion in English.

China

EALL 651

Advanced Readings: Modern Chinese Literature

Jing Tsu
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

A rigorous introduction to literary criticism and analysis using texts in the original language. Focus on the contemporary period, drawing from fiction written in Chinese in different parts of the world, from mainland China to Taiwan and from Malaysia to Hong Kong. Texts in both simplified and traditional characters.

China

EALL 657

Meiji Literature and Visual Culture

Seth Jacobowitz
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

This course introduces the literature and visual culture—novels, poetry, calligraphy, woodblock prints, painting, photography, and cinema—of Meiji Japan (1868–1912).

Japan

EALL 782, HIST 882

The Life of the Analects: From the Beginnings to the Present

Annping Chin
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

The course examines the formation of the Analects, its political uses in China’s imperial court, and its moral sway over the populace. It also looks at Western responses in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Emphasis is placed on the historical circumstances that allowed the text to grow and thrive.

China

EALL 801, CPLT 912

Media Theory, Capitalism, and Japanese Modernity

Seth Jacobowitz
T 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Fall

This course introduces students to key aspects of Western media theory and media history through readings by leading thinkers such as Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, Friedrich Kittler, Lewis Mumford, Martin Heidegger, and Marshall McLuhan. It then brings these works into dialogue with recent critical studies of Japanese modernity, capitalism, and contemporary information society by Naoki Sakai, Karatani Kojin, Akira Lippit, Azuma Hiroki, and others.

All readings are in English.

Japan

EALL 806, FILM 921

Research in Japanese Film History

Aaron Gerow
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Theorizations of film and culture in Japan from the 1910s to the present. Through readings in the works of a variety of authors, the course explores both the articulations of cinema in Japanese intellectual discourse and how this embodies the shifting position of film in Japanese popular cultural history.

Japan

EALL 869

Intellectual and Cultural History of Modern China

Jing Tsu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This colloquium deals with special topics in nineteenth- and twentieth-century China. It combines and encourages different empirical and theoretical approaches to cultural studies, intellectual history, and other comparative topics. We examine a range of materials, such as fiction, biographies, plays, manuals, official documents, journals, political and philosophical treatises, and different visual media, in addition to the appropriate scholarship. The topic for 2014–15 is science and civilization.

China

EALL 900

Directed Readings



Spring

Offered by permission of instructor and DGS to meet special needs not met by regular courses.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 900

Directed Readings



Fall

Offered by permission of instructor and DGS to meet special needs not met by regular courses.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 990

Directed Research



Spring

Offered as needed with permission of instructor and DGS for student preparation of dissertation prospectus.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 990

Directed Research



Fall

Offered as needed with permission of instructor and DGS for student preparation of dissertation prospectus.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 443, SOCY 374

Collective Memories in East Asia

Bin Xu
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Contemporary collective memory issues explored in the context of political forces and social changes in East Asia. Topics include general theories, nation-states and memories, wars and atrocities, and politics and memories. Readings from sociology, history, anthropology, and cultural studies.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 444, EVST 323, HIST 332J

China's Environmental History Since 1600

Jonathan Schlesinger
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Recent scholarship on climate change, resource management, water conservancy, public sanitation, and the shifting meanings of nature in Chinese culture and science from the early modern period to the present. Ways in which Chinese history and the natural environment have shaped one another; relations between China’s environmental history and contemporary global trends.

Permission of instructor required.

China

EAST 446, ARCH 355, HSAR 454

South Korean Urbanism

Seunghan Paek
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Modern and contemporary South Korean urbanism and its relation to discourses of the everyday. Focus on Seoul as a case study, with attention to commercial environments, ephemeral urban events, and local street cultures. Key texts by philosophers, historians, architectural theorists, and art historians analyzed in the context of artistic and architectural responses to Seoul’s urbanism in recent decades.

Permission of instructor required.

Korea

EAST 447, HIST 327J

Civilization in Meiji Japan

Kazumi Hasegawa
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Transformations in Japanese daily life, culture, politics, and economics during the Meiji period. Ways in which particular concepts and identities were shaped and constructed, including gender, sexuality, ethnicity, time, and language. The influence of Meiji Japan on modern Japanese history and society.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 491

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 492

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 519

China in World Politics

Jessica Weiss
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

China’s rise to prominence and its foreign relations from 1949 to the present, focusing on the post-Mao period.

China

EAST 557

State and Society in Post-Mao China

Jessica Weiss
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

State-society relations in the People’s Republic of China. Popular protest and social mobilization, media commercialization and the Internet, and prospects for political reform and democratization.

China

EP&E 290, EAST 290

Democracy, Development, and Security in the Korean Peninsula

Seok-Ju Cho
M 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

Politics and political economies in South and North Korea. Economic development, democratization, and political institutions of the two states; political and economic factors that have influenced the wide discrepancy between the two Koreas; issues in international relations, such as denuclearization, peacekeeping, and reunification.

Permission of instructor required.

Korea

GLBL 312, ECON 474, EAST 454

Economic and Policy Lessons from Japan

Stephen Roach
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

An evaluation of Japan’s protracted economic problems and of their potential implications for other economies, including the United States, Europe, and China. Currency pressures, policy blunders, Abenomics, bubbles, and the global economic crisis of 2008; dangers to the global economy from a protracted postcrisis recovery period. Focus on policy remedies to avert similar problems in other countries.

Permission of instructor required. Prerequisite: a course in macroeconomics.

Japan

GLBL 318, ECON 338, EAST 338

The Next China

Stephen Roach
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Economic development in China since the late 1970s. Emphasis on factors pushing China toward a transition from its modern export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. The possibility of a resulting identity crisis, underscored by China’s need to embrace political reform and by the West’s long-standing misperceptions of China.

Prerequisite: introductory macroeconomics.

China

GLBL 618, MGT 911

The Next China

Stephen Roach
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Born out of necessity in the post-Cultural Revolution chaos of the late 1970s, modern China is about reforms, opening up, and transition. The Next China will be driven by the transition from an export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. China’s new model could unmask a dual identity crisis—underscored by China’s need to embrace political reform and the West’s long-standing misperceptions about China.

Prerequisite: basic undergraduate macroeconomics.

China

HIST 038

The Mongols in China

Valerie Hansen
T, Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Spring

After Chinggis Khan unified the nomadic peoples living in felt tents in 1206, the Mongols went on to conquer vast swathes of Eurasia, and their empire in China continued until 1368. Examination of the non-Chinese peoples who preceded them, the reasons for their rise and their success, and their legacy. Extensive use of primary sources.

Permission of instructor required. Enrollment limited to freshmen.

China, Mongolia

HIST 303

Japan's Modern Revolution

Daniel Botsman
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

A survey of Japan’s transformation over the course of the nineteenth century from an isolated, traditional society on the edge of northeast Asia to a modern imperial power. Aspects of political, social, and cultural history.

Japan

HIST 317, EAST 317

China's Global Twentieth Century

Peter C. Perdue, Jan-Ru Huang
T, Th 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Fall

The history of China from the Sino-Japanese war of 1895 to the post-Deng era in the twenty-first century. Focus on China’s connections with the rest of the world and on the experiences of ordinary Chinese people during a time of tumultuous change.

China

HIST 321

China from Present to Past, 2015-600

Valerie Hansen, Peter C. Perdue
T, Th 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Spring

Underlying causes of current issues facing China traced back to their origins in the premodern period. Topics include economic development, corruption, environmental crises, gender, and Pacific island disputes. Selected primary-source readings in English, images, videos, and Web resources.

China

HIST 326J, EAST 326

Yale and Japan

Daniel Botsman
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

Exploration of Yale’s rich historical connections to Japan. Focus on use of the University’s museum and library collections to learn about various aspects of the Japanese past, from ancient times to the post-World War II era.

Permission of instructor required. Knowledge of Japanese helpful but not required.

Japan

HIST 470

World Finance, Mesopotamia to the Present

Valerie Hansen, William Goetzmann
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:20 PM
Fall

The history of finance from its earliest beginnings to the modern era, with particular attention to Mesopotamia, China, and Europe. The time value of money, including loans and interest; the negotiability of claims within a legal structure that handles claims; the ability to contract on future outcomes through life insurance and derivatives; corporations; causes and outcomes of economic bubbles.

This course meets during reading period.

China, Transregional

HIST 800, HSAR 746, MDVL 565

Circa 1000

Valerie Hansen, Mary Miller, Anders Winroth
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

The world in the year 1000, when the different regions of the world participated in complex networks. Archaeological excavations reveal that the Vikings reached L’Anse aux Meadows, Canada, at roughly the same time that the Kitan people defeated China’s Song dynasty and established a powerful empire stretching across the grasslands of Eurasia. Viking chieftains donned Chinese silks while Chinese princesses treasured Baltic amber among their jewelry. In what is now the American Southwest, the people of Chaco Canyon feasted on tropical chocolate, while the lords of Chichen Itza wore New Mexican turquoise—yet never knew the Huari lords of the central Andes. Islamic armies conquered territory in western China (modern Xinjiang) and northern India (around Delhi) for the first time. In this seminar, students read interpretative texts based on archaeology and primary sources, work with material culture, and develop skills of cross-cultural analysis.

China, Transregional, South Asia

HIST 868

Documents in Tang, Song, and Yuan Dynasties

Valerie Hansen
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

A survey of the historical genres of premodern China: the dynastic histories, other chronicles, gazetteers, literati notes, and Buddhist and Daoist canons. How to determine what different information these sources contain for research topics in different fields.

Prerequisite: at least one term of classical Chinese.

China

HIST 872, EALL 824

The Shenbao Lab: Explorations in Chinese Digital Humanities

Peter C. Perdue
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

The availability of abundant online sources in Chinese promises to reshape dramatically the ways in which we study modern Chinese history, but we need to gain experience in using new techniques of analysis of online digital sources. The complete online database of the text of the Shanghai newspaper Shenbao and part of its illustrated supplement, Dianshizhai Huabao, offers students new possibilities for looking at many topics of interest. These include the effects of mass journalism on public sentiments and the public sphere; the audiences of popular images and text; the relationship between elite writers and popular audiences; the overlapping and distinct appeals of literary tropes, mythology, news of Western affairs, and domestic news; and the impact of new technologies on Chinese urban society. Students read these and other online materials and write research papers that use them for original perspectives in modern Chinese cultural and social history.

Prerequisites: knowledge of classical and modern Chinese. Open to qualified undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

China

HIST 884

Readings in the History of Modern Japan

Daniel Botsman
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This class offers students an opportunity to explore recent English-language scholarship on the history of modern Japan (post-1868).

Japan

HSAR 484, EAST 474

Japanese Screens

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

The screen-painting tradition in Japan, particularly as it emerged in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The format, techniques, and functions of screen painting; poetic and literary connections, as well as studio practices and politics, of the principal lineages of painters; aesthetics and styles associated with varying classes of patronage, from the shoguns to Buddhist monks to the Japanese court.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

HSAR 814

Japan’s Global Baroque

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

The intersection of art, science, and diplomacy at Kyoto and Nagasaki in the time of Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish, and Dutch cultural and mercantile interaction in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, with attention to the entangled political relations linking the shogun Toyotomi Hideyoshi, Philip II of Spain, Jesuit missionaries such as Alessandro Valignano, and the Christian daimy­­­ō of Kyushu and the Inland Sea. Focus on Japanese castle architecture, nanban screens, world maps, arte sacra, and tea ceremony practices as related to the importation of European arte sacra, prints and drawings, scientific instruments, and world atlases such as Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. Includes inquiry into backformations such as “baroque” and “global” to describe and/or interpret sixteenth- and seventeenth-century cultural productions.

Japan

JAPN 110

Elementary Japanese I

Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura, Aoi Saito, Mari Stever
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Introductory language course for students with no previous background in Japanese. Development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, including 50 hiragana, 50 katakana, and 75 kanji characters. Introduction to cultural aspects such as levels of politeness and group concepts. In-class drills in pronunciation and conversation. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

Credit only on completion of JAPN 120. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 120

Elementary Japanese II

Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura, Aoi Saito, Mari Stever
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 110, with supplementary materials such as excerpts from television shows, anime, and songs. Introduction of 150 additional kanji.

After JAPN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 130

Intermediate Japanese I

Yoshiko Maruyama, Masahiko Seto
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Continued development in both written and spoken Japanese. Aspects of Japanese culture, such as history, art, religion, and cuisine, explored through text, film, and animation. Online audio and visual aids facilitate listening, as well as the learning of grammar and kanji. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 140

Intermediate Japanese II

Yoshiko Maruyama, Masahiko Seto
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 130.

After JAPN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 150

Advanced Japanese I

Yoshiko Maruyama, Mari Stever
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Advanced language course that further develops proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Reading and discussion materials include works by Nobel Prize winners. Japanese anime and television dramas are used to enhance listening and to develop skills in culturally appropriate speech. Writing of essays, letters, and criticism solidifies grammar and style. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 140 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 151

Advanced Japanese II

Yoshiko Maruyama, Mari Stever
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 150.

After JAPN 150 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 156

Advanced Japanese III

Koichi Hiroe, Michiaki Murata
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Close reading of modern Japanese writing on current affairs, social science, history, and literature. Development of speaking and writing skills in academic settings, including formal speeches, interviews, discussions, letters, e-mail, and expository writing. Interviews of and discussions with native speakers on current issues. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 157

Advanced Japanese IV

Koichi Hiroe, Michiaki Murata
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 156.

After JAPN 156 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 162

Reading Academic Japanese I

Masahiko Seto
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Close reading of major writings from the Meiji era to the present, including newspaper articles, scholarly works, fiction, and prose. Students gain a command of academic Japanese through comprehensive study of grammar in the context of culture. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 157 or equivalent; recommended to be taken after or concurrently with JAPN 170.

Japan

JAPN 163

Reading Academic Japanese II

Masahiko Seto
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 162.

After JAPN 162 or equivalent; recommended to be taken after JAPN 170.

Japan

JAPN 164

Academic and Professional Spoken Japanese

Koichi Hiroe
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on the speaking skills necessary in academic and professional settings. Includes online interviews, discussions, and debates with native Japanese students and scholars on contemporary topics such as globalization, environment, technology, human rights, and cultural studies. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 163 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 165

Academic and Professional Spoken Japanese

Koichi Hiroe
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on the speaking skills necessary in academic and professional settings. Includes online interviews, discussions, and debates with native Japanese students and scholars on contemporary topics such as globalization, environment, technology, human rights, and cultural studies. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 163 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 170

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Edward Kamens
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 171

Readings in Literary Japanese

Riley Soles
M,W 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Close analytical reading of a selection of texts from the Nara through the Tokugawa periods: prose, poetry, and various genres. Introduction to kanbun.

After JAPN 170 or equivalent. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

JAPN 570

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Edward Kamens
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 571

Readings in Literary Japanese

Riley Soles
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Close analytical reading of a selection of texts from the Nara through Tokugawa period: prose, poetry, and various genres. Introduction of kanbun.

After JAPN 570 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 736

Poetry and Poetics

Edward Kamens
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Readings in classical poetry, treatises, and commentaries; offered in conjunction with EALL 536 for students with proficiency in literary Japanese.

Japan

KREN 110

Elementary Korean I

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

A beginning course in modern Korean. Pronunciation, lectures on grammar, conversation practice, and introduction to the writing system (Hankul).

Credit only on completion of KREN 120. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 120

Elementary Korean II

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 110.

After KREN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 130

Intermediate Korean I

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Continued development of skills in modern Korean, spoken and written, leading to intermediate-level proficiency.

After KREN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 132

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners I

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Intended for students with some oral proficiency but little or no training in Hankul. Focus on grammatical analysis, the standard spoken language, and intensive training in reading and writing.

This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 140

Intermediate Korean II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 130.

After KREN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 142

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 132.

After KREN 132 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 152

Advanced Korean for Advanced Learners

Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

An advanced course in modern Korean. Reading of short stories, essays, and journal articles, and introduction of 200 Chinese characters. Students develop their speaking and writing skills through discussions and written exercises.

After KREN 142 or 151, or with permission of instructor.

Korea

KREN 154

Advanced Korean III

Seungja Choi
W 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Spring

An advanced language course designed to develop reading and writing skills using Web-based texts in a variety of genres. Students read texts independently and complete comprehension and vocabulary exercises through the Web. Discussions, tests, and intensive writing training in class.

After KREN 151 or equivalent.

Korea

MGT 649

World Financial History

Valerie Hansen, William Goetzmann
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:20 PM
Fall

The history of finance from its earliest beginnings to the modern era, with particular attention to Mesopotamia, China, and Europe. The time value of money, including loans and interest; the negotiability of claims within a legal structure that handles claims; the ability to contract on future outcomes through life insurance and derivatives; corporations; causes and outcomes of economic bubbles.

China, Transregional

PHIL 210

Eastern Philosophy

Quang Phu Van
T, Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Spring

An introduction to Eastern philosophy through the study of philosophical and religious texts. Topics include reality and illusion, knowledge, self, right and wrong, nonattachment, meditation, aesthetics, meaning of life, and death.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia

PLSC 132, GLBL 379

China's International Relations

Jessica Weiss
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

Analysis of contemporary Chinese diplomacy, including China’s increasing regional and global influence. Mainstream concepts and theories in international relations applied to current events and policy debates.

Permission of instructor required. Priority to majors in Political Science and in Global Affairs.

China

PLSC 162

Japan and the World

Frances McCall Rosenbluth
Th 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

The historical development of Japan’s international relations since the late Tokugawa period; World War II and its legacy; domestic institutions and foreign policy; implications for the United States; and interactions between nationalism and regionalism.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

PLSC 179, EAST 219

China in World Politics

Jessica Weiss
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

China’s rise to prominence and its foreign relations from 1949 to the present, focusing on the post-Mao period.

China

PLSC 390, EAST 357, EP&E 293

State and Society in Post-Mao China

Jessica Weiss
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

State-society relations in the People’s Republic of China. Popular protest and social mobilization, media commercialization and the Internet, and prospects for political reform and democratization.

Permission of instructor required.

China

PLSC 678

Japan and the World

Frances McCall Rosenbluth
Th 9:25 - 11:15
Spring

The historical development of Japan’s international relations since the late Tokugawa period; World War II and its legacy; domestic institutions and foreign policy; implications for the United States; and interactions between nationalism and regionalism.

Japan

PLSC 686

Chinese Foreign Policy

Jessica Weiss
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

In this seminar, students think deeply and critically about China’s growing influence and foreign relations. Topics include power transitions, deterrence and reassurance, nationalism and sovereignty, public opinion, leadership, perceptions and misperceptions, soft power and public diplomacy, and regional balancing and alliances. Each week includes applications to current events and debates, including China’s activities in the South China Sea, the U.S. “pivot” to Asia, relations with neighboring countries, crises in U.S.-China relations, and the so-called China model.

Permission of instructor required.

China

RLST 126, SAST 262

Tibetan Buddhism

Andrew Quintman
T, Th 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Introduction to major themes in Tibetan Buddhist thought and practice. Buddhist ethics, systems of monastic and ascetic life, ritual applications, sacred geography and pilgrimage, lay religion, and the status of Buddhism in Chinese-occupied Tibet and in the West.

China, Transregional, South Asia

RLST 182, SAST 459

Buddhist Traditions of Mind and Meditation

Andrew Quintman
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Buddhist meditation practices examined in the context of traditional theories of mind, perception, and cognition. Readings both from Buddhist canonical works and from secondary scholarship on cognitive science and ritual practice.

Permission of instructor required. Recommended preparation: a course in Asian religions.

China, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia

RLST 565, SAST 559

Buddhist Traditions of Mind and Meditation

Andrew Quintman
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Buddhist meditation practices examined in the context of traditional theories of mind, perception, and cognition. Readings both from Buddhist canonical works and from secondary scholarship on cognitive science and ritual practice.

China, Transregional, South Asia, Tibet

RLST 566, SAST 557

Readings in Himalayan Buddhism

Andrew Quintman
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

,

Andrew Quintman
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A critical examination of Buddhist traditions in the Himalayan world, including North India, Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet. The seminar focuses on works of philosophy and literature, ritual, sacred geography, and material and visual culture to address the production of local Buddhist ideas and practices and their circulation across geopolitical boundaries.

China, Transregional, South Asia, Tibet

SOCY 086

Chinese Society since Mao

Deborah Davis
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

An overview of the major social institutions in contemporary China, with a focus on the changing relationship between individual and society. Use of print and visual sources to explore the social consequences of China’s recent retreat from socialism and its rapid integration into the global economy.

Permission of instructor required. Enrollment limited to freshmen.

China

SOCY 310, EAST 410

Civil Society, Public Sphere, and Civic Life in Contemporary China

Deborah Davis
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

The changing character of civil society and the public sphere under various  political conditions in modern China. Key themes are the possibilities for civic action, citizenship, and state-society relations.

Permission of instructor required. Prerequisite: a previous course on modern China or extended residence in Taiwan, Hong Kong, or the People's Republic of China. Preference to majors in Sociology or East Asian Studies in their junior and senior years.

China

SOCY 395, EAST 408, EP&E 269

Wealth and Poverty in Modern China

Deborah Davis
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The underlying causes and consequences of the changing distribution of income, material assets, and political power in contemporary China. Substantive focus on inequality and stratification. Instruction in the use of online Chinese resources relevant to research. Optional weekly Chinese language discussions.

Permission of instructor required. Prerequisite: a previous course on China since 1949.

China

SOCY 507, EAST 501

Social Science Workshop on Contemporary China

Deborah Davis
F 11:45 AM - 12:45 PM
Spring

A weekly workshop to encourage dialogue across disciplines among faculty, visiting professionals, and graduate students doing research in contemporary China. At each session, one Yale faculty, visitor, or advanced graduate student speaks briefly in regard to current work in progress. In most weeks, a paper or memo is circulated in advance, and each session allows for extensive discussion. One unit of course credit is available to students who attend 80 percent of the sessions in both terms and submit a thirty-page paper by April 24. Permission of the instructor required.

China

SOCY 507, EAST 501

Social Science Workshop on Contemporary China

Deborah Davis
F 11:45 AM - 12:45 PM
Fall

A weekly workshop to encourage dialogue across disciplines among faculty, visiting professionals, and graduate students doing research in contemporary China. At each session, one Yale faculty, visitor, or advanced graduate student speaks briefly in regard to current work in progress. In most weeks, a paper or memo is circulated in advance, and each session allows for extensive discussion. One unit of course credit is available to students who attend 80 percent of the sessions in both terms and submit a thirty-page paper by April 24.

Permission of the instructor required.

China

SOCY 596, EAST 596

Wealth and Poverty in Modern China

Deborah Davis
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The underlying causes and consequences of the changing distribution of income, material assets, and political power in contemporary China. Substantive focus on inequality and stratification. Instruction in the use of online Chinese resources relevant to research. Optional weekly Chinese language discussions.

Permission of the instructor required.

China