CEAS Courses 2016-2017

This list is subject to modification.

Some of the information contained here may have changed since the time of publication. Always check with the department under which the course is listed or on the official Yale Online Course Information website to make sure that the courses you are interested in are still being offered and that the times have not changed. Course information is also available on the Yale Blue Book website.

If you have questions about any of the courses listed here, please contact the offering department directly.

ANTH 254

Japan: Culture, Society, Modernity

Sarah LeBaron von Baeyer
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Introduction to Japanese society and culture. The historical development of Japanese society; family, work, and education in contemporary Japan; Japanese aesthetics; and psychological, sociological, and cultural interpretations of Japanese behavior.

Japan

ANTH 304

Transnational Migration and East Asia

Sarah LeBaron von Baeyer
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Exploration of key anthropological and sociological approaches to transnational migration to/from East Asia in the current era of intensified globalization. Consideration of: migration within, and to East Asia, including labor migration to South Korea and African Pentecostal migration to China; ethnic communities in Japan such as the Koreans and recent migrant arrivals such as the Filipinos, Nepalese, and Brazilians; and current global migrations from/out of East Asia, including Chinese migrants in both South Africa and Brazil and Koreans in the United States.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

ANTH 414, EAST 417

Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations; class, gender, ethnicity, and migration; and global landscapes of power and citizenship.

Permission of instructor required. This course meets during reading period.

China, Transregional

ANTH 415

Culture, History, Power, and Representation

Helen Siu
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A critical introduction to anthropological formulations of the junctures of meaning, interest, and power. Readings include classical and contemporary ethnographies that are theoretically informed and historically situated.

Permission of instructor required. This course meets during reading period.

China, Transregional

ANTH 515

Culture, History, Power, and Representation

Helen Siu
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A critical introduction to anthropological formulations of the junctures of meaning, interest, and power. Readings include classical and contemporary ethnographies that are theoretically informed and historically situated.

China, Transregional

ANTH 541, F&ES 836, HIST 965, PLSC 779

Agrarian Societies: Culture, Society, History, and Development

Fabian Drixler, Peter C. Perdue, James Scott
W 1:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

An interdisciplinary examination of agrarian societies, contemporary and historical, Western and non-Western. Major analytical perspectives from anthropology, economics, history, political science, and environmental studies are used to develop a meaning-centered and historically grounded account of the transformations of rural society.

Team Taught

China, Transregional, South Asia

ANTH 575, EAST 575

Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations, class, gender, ethnicity, migration, and global landscapes of power and citizenship.

China, Transregional

ANTH 787, ARCG 787, HSAR 804

East Asian Objects and Museums: Collection, Curation, and Display

Youn-mi Kim, Anne Underhill
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

This course explores the East Asian art and anthropological collections at Yale’s museums and at other major museums in North America and East Asia. Students study collec­tions and their histories; gain experience in museum practices; and learn from specialists through class visits to other relevant museums in the United States and an associated international conference, Material Culture and Everyday Life before the Korean War: Workshop on the Korean Art and Photograph Collections at the Yale Peabody Museum, sponsored by the Council on East Asian Studies. Opportunities for a student-curated exhibition at Yale are being developed.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

ARCH 3264

“Micro” in Japanese Architecture and Urbanism

Sunil Bald
HTBA
Spring

This seminar focuses on recent trends in Japanese architecture and design culture over the past twenty years that developed since the bursting of the bubble economy and the architectural excess it enabled. The course looks at architectural, urban, and aesthetic concepts that embrace the diminutive. Topics include the contemporary Japanese house, micro-urbanism, return to nature movements, and concepts of both the cute and monstrous. These are explored through a series of lenses that engage tradition, pragmatism, sustainability, gender, and nationalism. The seminar requires readings and class discussion as well as an independent research project that culminates in a presentation and a paper.

Limited enrollment.

Japan

ARCH 3265

Architecture and Urbanism of Modern Japan

Yoko Kawai
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This course examines how design philosophies and methodologies were developed in Japanese architecture during the 130-year period from the Meiji Restoration until the postmodern era. Special attention is paid to the process of urbanization through repeated destructions and the forming of cultural identity through mutual interactions with the West, both of which worked as major forces that shaped architectural developments. Highlighted architects include Chuta Ito, Goichi Takeda, Frank Lloyd Wright, Kameki Tsuchiura, Sutemi Horiguchi, Kunio Maekawa, Kenzo Tange, Arata Isozaki, Fumihiko Maki, Kisho Kurokawa, Kazuo Shinohara, Tadao Ando, and Mirei Shigemori. Historical photos and excerpts from films are used to better understand context. Students are required to make in-class presentations and write a final paper.

Limited enrollment.

Japan

ARCH 341, LAST 318

Globalization Space

Keller Easterling
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Infrastructure space as a primary medium of change in global polity. Networks of trade, energy, communication, transportation, spatial products, finance, management, and labor, as well as new strains of political opportunity that reside within their spatial disposition. Case studies include free zones and automated ports around the world, satellite urbanism in South Asia, high-speed rail in Japan and the Middle East, agripoles in southern Spain, fiber optic submarine cable in East Africa, spatial products of tourism in North Korea, and management platforms of the International Organization for Standardization.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

ARCH 4216, F&ES 782

Globalization Space

Keller Easterling
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Infrastructure space as a primary medium of change in global polity. Networks of trade, energy, communication, transportation, spatial products, finance, management, and labor, as well as new strains of political opportunity that reside within their spatial disposition. Case studies include free zones and automated ports around the world, satellite urbanism in South Asia, high-speed rail in Japan and the Middle East, agripoles in southern Spain, fiber optic submarine cable in East Africa, spatial products of tourism in North Korea, and management platforms of the International Organization for Standardization.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

CHNS 110

Elementary Modern Chinese I

Min Chen, Jianhua Shen, Chuanmei Sun, Yu-Lin Saussy, Yongtao Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Intended for students with no background in Chinese. An intensive course with emphasis on spoken language and drills. Pronunciation, grammatical analysis, conversation practice, and introduction to reading and writing Chinese characters.

Credit only on completion of CHNS 120b. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 120

Elementary Modern Chinese II

Min Chen, Jianhua Shen, Chuanmei Sun, Yu-Lin Saussy
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 110.

After CHNS 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 130

Intermediate Modern Chinese I

Ninghui Liang, Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An intermediate course that continues intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and consolidates achievements from the first year of study. Students improve oral fluency, study more complex grammatical structures, and enlarge both reading and writing vocabulary.

After CHNS 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 132

Elementary Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners I

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Fan Liu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

First level of the advanced learner sequence, intended for students with some aural proficiency but limited ability in reading and writing Chinese. Training in listening and speaking, with emphasis on reading and writing.

Placement confirmed by placement test and by instructor. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 140

Intermediate Modern Chinese II

Ninghui Liang, Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 130. To be followed by CHNS 150.

After CHNS 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 142

Elementary Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners II

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Fan Liu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 132.

After CHNS 132 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 150

Advanced Modern Chinese I

Rongzhen Li, Yu-Lin Saussy, Yongtao Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Third level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Use of audiovisual materials, oral presentations, skits, and longer and more frequent writing assignments to assimilate more sophisticated grammatical structures. Further introduction to a wide variety of written forms and styles. Use of both traditional and simplified forms of Chinese characters.

After CHNS 140 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 151

Advanced Modern Chinese II

Rongzhen Li
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 PM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 150.

After CHNS 150 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 152

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Haiwen Wang
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate to advanced oral proficiency and high elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them.

After CHNS 142 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 153

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Haiwen Wang
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate to advanced oral proficiency and high elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them.

After CHNS 142 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 154

Advanced Modern Chinese III

William Zhou
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Fourth level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Readings in a wide range of subjects form the basis of discussion and other activities. Students consolidate their skills, especially speaking proficiency, at an advanced level. Materials use both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 151 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 155

Advanced Modern Chinese IV

William Zhou
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 154.

After CHNS 154 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 162

Advanced Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Wei Su
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Third level of the advanced learner sequence in Chinese. Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills (able to conduct conversations fluently) and with high intermediate reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000–1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 153 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 163

Advanced Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Wei Su
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Third level of the advanced learner sequence in Chinese. Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills (able to conduct conversations fluently) and with high intermediate reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000-1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 153 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 164

Readings in Contemporary Chinese Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Selected readings in Chinese fiction of the 1980s and 1990s. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 165

Readings in Modern Chinese Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Reading and discussion of modern short stories, most written prior to 1949. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 166

Chinese Media and Society

William Zhou
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on speaking and writing skills. Issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as newspapers, radio, television, and Internet blogs.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 167

Chinese Media and Society

William Zhou
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on speaking and writing skills. Issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as newspapers, radio, television, and Internet blogs.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 168

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Min Chen
M,W,F 1:30 PM-2:20 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 169

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Min Chen
M,W,F 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 170

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Michael Hunter
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, CHNS 153, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 171

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 170.

After CHNS 170. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 570

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Michael Hunter
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, 153, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 571

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 570.

After CHNS 570 or equivalent.

China

EALL 050

Imperial Pleasure Parks and Private Gardens of China

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Study of imperial parks and private gardens in China, focusing on five historic times, spanning from the second century CE to modernity. Topics include the rationales, philosophies, and economics of constructing gardens; their designs; depictions in paintings and literature; their impact on the Chinese cultural imagination; modern commercial recreations of earlier gardens and environmental art; and the changing uses of gardens through time.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required. Permission required.

China

EALL 200

The Chinese Tradition

Lucas Bender, Tina Lu
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

An introduction to the literature, culture, and thought of premodern China, from the beginnings of the written record to the turn of the twentieth century. Close study of textual and visual primary sources, with attention to their historical and cultural backdrops.

No knowledge of Chinese required.

China

EALL 203, LITR 197

The Tale of Genji

Edward Kamens
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

A reading of the central work of prose fiction in the Japanese classical tradition in its entirety (in English translation) along with some examples of predecessors, parodies, and adaptations (the latter include Noh plays and twentieth-century short stories). Topics of discussion include narrative form, poetics, gendered authorship and readership, and the processes and premises that have given The Tale of Genji its place in “world literature.” Attention will also be given to the text’s special relationship to visual culture.

No knowledge of Japanese required. A previous college-level course in the study of literary texts is recommended but not required.

Japan

EALL 210, LITR 172

Man and Nature in Chinese Literature

Kang-I Chang
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

An exploration of man and nature in traditional Chinese literature, with special attention to aesthetic and cultural meanings. Topics include the concept of nature and literature; neo-Taoist self-cultivation; poetry and Zen (Chan) Buddhism; travel in literature; loss, lament, and self-reflection in song lyrics; nature and the supernatural in classical tales; love and allusions to nature; religious pilgrimage and allegory.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese. Formerly CHNS 200.

China

EALL 211, LITR 174, WGSS 405

Women and Literature in Traditional China

Kang-I Chang
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

A study of major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. The power of women’s writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; footbinding; notions of love and death; the aesthetics of illness; women and revolution; poetry clubs; the function of memory in women’s literature; problems of gender and genre.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese. Formerly CHNS 201.

China

EALL 255

Japanese Modernism

Seth Jacobowitz
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Japanese literature and art from the 1920s through the 1940s. The avant-garde and mass culture; popular genre fiction; the advent of new media technologies and techniques; effects of Japanese imperialism, militarism, and fascism on cultural production; experimental writers and artists and their resistance to, or complicity with, the state.

Japan

EALL 281, FILM 304

Japanese Cinema and Its Others

Aaron Gerow
T,Th 11.35 AM - 12.50 PM Screenings W 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Fall

Critical inquiry into the myth of a homogeneous Japan through analysis of how Japanese film and media historically represents “others” of different races, ethnicities, nationalities, genders, and sexualities, including blacks, ethnic Koreans, Okinawans, Ainu, undocumented immigrants, LGBT minorities, the disabled, youth, and monstrous others like ghosts.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 286, HUMS 290, LITR 285, PORT 360

The Modern Novel in Brazil and Japan

Seth Jacobowitz
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Brazilian and Japanese novels from the late nineteenth century to the present. Representative texts from major authors are read in pairs to explore their commonalities and divergences. Topics include nineteenth-century realism and naturalism, the rise of mass culture and the avant-garde, and existentialism and postmodernism.

No knowledge of Portuguese or Japanese required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan, Transregional

EALL 302

Readings in Classical Chinese Prose

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Close reading of classical prose and critical texts. Readings vary from year to year. Topics include literature, politics, textual transmission, reception, and premodern Chinese culture.

Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. Prerequisite: CHNS 171 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Formerly CHNS 302. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 303

Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Fundamentals of classical Chinese poetry and poetics. Readings vary from year to year; topics include poetry and history, intertextuality, and poetic reception.

Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. After CHNS 171 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Formerly CHNS 303. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 308, PHIL 410

Sages of the Ancient World

Michael Hunter
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Comparative survey of the embodiment and performance of wisdom by ancient sages. Distinctive features and common themes in discourses about wisdom from China, India, the Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Topics include teaching, scheming, and dying.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional

EALL 319

The Vernacular Short Story in Early Modern China

Tina Lu
W 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Spring

Introduction to the literary genre huaben, or the vernacular short story. Seventeenth century texts, written in a version of spoken Chinese, provide an unparalleled view of life in early modern China. Discussions of book culture, commercial publication, and the social role of the vernacular.

Prerequisite: Ability to read modern Chinese (L5). Permission required.

China

EALL 357

Meiji Literature and Visual Culture

Seth Jacobowitz
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Introduction to the literature and visual culture of Meiji Japan (1868–1912), including novels, poetry, calligraphy, woodblock prints, painting, photography, and cinema. The relationship between theories and practices of fine art and literature; changes in word and image relations; transformations from woodblock to movable-type print culture; the invention of photography and early forms of cinematic practice.

No knowledge of Japanese required. Permission of instructor required

Japan

EALL 503

The Tale of Genji

Edward Kamens
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

A reading of the central work of prose fiction in the Japanese classical tradition in its entirety (in English translation) along with some examples of predecessors, parodies, and adaptations (the latter include Noh plays and twentieth-century short stories). Topics of discussion include narrative form, poetics, gendered authorship and readership, and the processes and premises that have given The Tale of Genji its place in world literature. Attention is also given to the text’s special relationship to visual culture.

Japan

EALL 510

Man and Nature in Chinese Literature

Kang-I Chang
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

An exploration of man and nature in traditional Chinese literature, with special attention to aesthetic and cultural meanings. Topics include the concept of nature and literature; Neo-Daoist self-cultivation; poetry and Zen (Chan) Buddhism; travel in literature; loss, lament, and self-reflection in song lyrics; nature and the supernatural in classical tales; love and allusions to nature; religious pilgrimage and allegory.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese.

China

EALL 511

Women and Literature in Traditional China

Kang-I Chang
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

This course focuses on major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. Topics include the power of women’s writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; the cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; foot binding and its implications; women’s notion of love and death; the aesthetic of illness; women and revolution; women’s poetry clubs; the function of memory in women’s literature; problems of gender and genre.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese.

China

EALL 555

Japanese Modernism

Seth Jacobowitz
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Japanese literature and art from the 1920s through the 1940s. The avant-garde and mass culture; popular genre fiction; the advent of new media technologies and tech­niques; effects of Japanese imperialism, militarism, and fascism on cultural production; experimental writers and artists and their resistance to, or complicity with, the state.

Japan

EALL 581, FILM 873

Japanese Cinema and Its Others

Aaron Gerow
T, Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM, Screenings W 6:30 PM
Fall

A critical inquiry into the myth of a homogeneous Japan through analyzing how Japanese film and media historically represent “others” of different races, ethnicities, nationalities, genders, and sexualities, including blacks, ethnic Koreans, Okinawans, Ainu, undocu­mented immigrants, LGBT minorities, the disabled, youth, and “monstrous” others like ghosts.

Japan

EALL 586, CPLT 952

The Modern Novel in Brazil and Japan

Seth Jacobowitz
W 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Spring

Brazilian and Japanese novels from the late nineteenth century to the present. Representative texts from major authors are read in pairs to explore their commonalities and divergences. Topics include nineteenth-century realism and naturalism, the rise of mass culture and the avant-garde, and existentialism and postmodernism.

Japan, Transregional

EALL 602

Readings in Classical Chinese Prose

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Close reading of classical prose, critical texts, etc. Topics include literature, politics, tex­tual transmission, reception, and premodern Chinese culture. 

Because readings are different each year, this course may be repeated for credit. Readings in Chinese, discussion in English.

China

EALL 603

Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A seminar on classical Chinese poetry and poetics. Topics include poetry and cultural history, intertextuality, poetics of lyricism, etc. 

Because readings are different each year, this course may be repeated for credit. Readings in Chinese, discussion in English.

China

EALL 608

Sages of the Ancient World

Michael Hunter
T, Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Comparative survey of the embodiment and performance of wisdom by ancient sages. Distinctive features and common themes in discourses about wisdom from China, India, the Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Topics include teaching, scheming, and dying.

China, Transregional

EALL 651

Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese Literature

Jing Tsu
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

A rigorous introduction to literary criticism and analysis using texts in the original language. Focus on the contemporary period, drawing from fiction written in Chinese in different parts of the world, from mainland China to Taiwan and from Malaysia to Hong Kong. Texts in both simplified and traditional characters. 

China

EALL 657

Meiji Literature and Visual Culture

Seth Jacobowitz
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Introduction to the literature and visual culture of Meiji Japan (1868–1912), including novels, poetry, calligraphy, woodblock prints, painting, photography, and cinema. The relationship between theories and practices of fine art and literature; changes in word and image relations; transformations from woodblock to movable-type print culture; the invention of photography and early forms of cinematic practice.

Japan

EALL 720

Studies in Premodern Japanese Literature

Edward Kamens
W 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Spring

A research seminar. Students pursue individual topics in pre-seventeenth-century literature and share readings and analyses for discussion on a rotating basis. 

Prerequisite: proficiency in reading literary Japanese.

Japan

EALL 759

Studies in the Man’yōshū

Edward Kamens
W 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Fall

Close study of the anthology and consultation in a variety of commentaries and critiques. Students carry out research projects on topics of their choice. 

Prerequisite: at least one year or the equivalent of study of literary Japanese.

Japan

EALL 761

Topics in Early Chinese Thought

Michael Hunter
W 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Spring

An examination of certain key problems in the study of early Chinese thought. Top­ics vary from year to year but in general include intellectual typologies and affiliations, relating received texts and excavated manuscripts, the role of Han editors in shaping pre- Han textual traditions, ruling ideology, and comparisons with other parts of the ancient world. 

Discussions and papers are in English. Because readings are different each year, this course may be repeated for credit.

China

EALL 802

Brazil in the Japanese Imperial Imagination

Seth Jacobowitz
T 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Fall

This seminar examines Japanese immigrant literature in Brazil in the broader context of Japanese imperialism and expansionism. 

Primary sources are read in Japanese with secondary scholarship in Japanese and English.

Japan, Transregional

EALL 846, CPLT 546

Philology and Sinology

Jing Tsu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

In this course we examine the history and theoretical foundations of non-Western philol­ogy in relation to Western philology and linguistics. We study how they interacted and the development of comparative methods based on notions of sameness and difference.

China

EALL 872, FILM 880

Theories of Popular Culture in Japan: Television

Aaron Gerow
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM, Screenings HTBA
Spring

Exploration of postwar theories of popular culture and subculture in Japan, particularly focusing on the intellectual debates over television and new media.

Japan

EALL 900

Directed Readings



Spring

Offered by permission of instructor and DGS to meet special needs not met by regular courses.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 900

Directed Readings



Fall

Offered by permission of instructor and DGS to meet special needs not met by regular courses.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 990

Directed Research



Spring

Offered as needed with permission of instructor and DGS for student preparation of dissertation prospectus.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 990

Directed Research



Fall

Offered as needed with permission of instructor and DGS for student preparation of dissertation prospectus.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 145

Cross-Cultural Narratives of Desire

William Summers
T 7:00 PM - 8:50 PM
Fall

Discourses of desire as reflected in literature, history, popular culture, medicine, and science, with both Western and non-Western examples. Connections with shifting notions of gender and sexuality; intersections with race, class, and culture.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional

EAST 401, EALL 282

Popular Culture in Motion

Cindi Textor
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Exploration of Korean and Japanese popular culture through a transnational lens —including literature, film, TV dramas, anime, manga, and pop music—in the twentieth century. Introduction of key concepts and debates in cultural studies of the Japanese empire and its contemporary vestiges in Japan and Korea. 

Permission of instructor required.

Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 402, EALL 239, ER&M 344, THST 443

Race, Gender, and Performance in East Asia

Soo Ryon Yoon
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Survey of contemporary performances in and around East Asia to more clearly understand the embodied processes in which racial and gendered social practices are shaped. Situating discussions in the specific political and cultural context of East Asia, students examine contemporary concert dance, K-pop idols, club and social dances, and protests and festivals in tandem with exploration of key concepts and theories.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 403, ANTH 402

Recognition, Shame, and the State in Contemporary Japan

Klaus Yamamoto-Hammering
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Exploration of the historical relation between the Japanese state and certain marginalized social groups, specifically the stigma which attaches to some groups and the role of the state in producing these stigmas. Social groups considered include: construction workers or day laborers of postwar recovery; the burakumin or outcaste class; resident foreigners, such as the Chinese and Koreans; Okinawans; Fukushima residents, radical leftists, and World War II comfort women. 

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EAST 404, PLSC 396

Contemporary State Building in Asia

Marc Opper
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Consideration of the legacies of war and revolution in China, Vietnam, Malaysia, and other areas of Southeast Asia. Exploration of the process and consequences of political strategies in wartime and the establishment of political institutions, with empirical focus on the Chinese Revolution and how the legacies of that conflict shaped the modern Chinese state.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional, Southeast Asia

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 491

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 492

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 900

Master’s Thesis

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 910

Independent Study

By arrangement with faculty and with approval of the DGS.

China, Japan, Transregional

GLBL 312, EAST 454, ECON 474

Economic and Policy Lessons from Japan

Stephen Roach
HTBA
Spring

An evaluation of Japan’s protracted economic problems and of their potential implications for other economies, including the United States, Europe, and China. Currency pressures, policy blunders, Abenomics, bubbles, and the global economic crisis of 2008; dangers to the global economy from a protracted postcrisis recovery period. Focus on policy remedies to avert similar problems in other countries.

Prerequisite: a course in macroeconomics. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

GLBL 318, EAST 338, ECON 338

The Next China

Stephen Roach
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Economic development in China since the late 1970s. Emphasis on factors pushing China toward a transition from its modern export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. The possibility of a resulting identity crisis, underscored by China’s need to embrace political reform and by the West’s long-standing misperceptions of China.

Prerequisite: introductory macroeconomics.

China

GLBL 618, MGT 911

The Next China

Stephen Roach
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Born out of necessity in the post-Cultural Revolution chaos of the late 1970s, modern China is about reforms, opening up, and transition. The Next China will be driven by the transition from an export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. China’s new model could unmask a dual identity crisis—underscored by China’s need to embrace political reform and the West’s long-standing misperceptions about China. 

Prerequisite: basic undergraduate macroeconomics.

China

HIST 030, EAST 030

Tokyo

Fabian Drixler
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Four centuries of Japan’s history explored through the many incarnations, destructions, and rebirths of its foremost city. Focus on the solutions found by Tokyo’s residents to the material and social challenges of concentrating such a large population in one place. Tensions between continuity and impermanence, authenticity and modernity, and social order and the culture of play.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

HIST 032, EAST 032

Shanghai

Denise Ho
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

History of the city of Shanghai, with a focus on how Shanghai has been seen and what its experience reveals about modern China. Shanghai’s unique place in imagining China; its transformation in the nineteenth century from a fishing village to an international “treaty port” and China’s gateway to the West; twentieth-century Shanghai as a site of innovation, from politics and capitalism to media and fashion; the city’s vilification in the early Mao years and later reemergence as a symbol of China’s modernization.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required. Permission of instructor required.

China

HIST 307, EAST 301

The Making of Japan's Great Peace, 1550-1850

Fabian Drixler
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Examination of how, after centuries of war in Japan and overseas, the Tokugawa shogunate built a peace that lasted more than 200 years. Japan’s urban revolution, the eradication of Christianity, the Japanese discovery of Europe, and the question whether Tokugawa Japan is a rare example of a complex and populous society that achieved ecological sustainability.

Japan

HIST 307J

The Confucian Dilemma in the Later Centuries

Annping Chin
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

How the political experience of the scholar-officials in China’s second millennium helped to revise and retool the relationship of self, society, and the state that Confucians had articulated in the previous centuries.  

Permission of instructor required.

China

HIST 308J

History and Politics in Early China

Annping Chin
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

How the history and politics of early China came to shape political thinking and policy debates in two thousand years of imperial rule.

Permission of instructor required.

China

HIST 309J, EAST 309

Uses of the Past in Modern China

Denise Ho
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Modern China’s use of the past in state-sponsored narratives of nation, in attempts to construct heritage by elites and intellectuals, and in grassroots projects of remembrance. Theories on history and memory; primary sources in English translation; case studies from twentieth-century China. Interdisciplinary readings in art history, anthropology, cultural studies, and history.

Permission of instructor required.

China

HIST 326J, EAST 326

Yale and Japan

Daniel Botsman
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Exploration of Yale’s rich historical connections to Japan. Focus on use of the University’s museum and library collections to learn about various aspects of the Japanese past, from ancient times to the post-World War II era.

Knowledge of Japanese helpful but not required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

HIST 373

The Silk Road

Valerie Hansen
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

A journey along the overland and sea routes that connected China, India, and Iran from 200 to 1000 C.E. and served as conduits for cultural exchange. The lives of merchants, envoys, pilgrims, and travelers interacting in cosmopolitan communities. Exploration of long-known and newly discovered archaeological ruins, along with primary sources in translation.

China, Transregional, South Asia

HIST 375, EAST 375

China from Mao to Now

Denise Ho
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

The history of the People’s Republic of China from Mao to now, with a focus on understanding the recent Chinese past and framing contemporary events in China in historical context. How the party-state is organized; interactions between state and society; causes and consequences of economic disparities; ways in which various groups—from intellectuals to religious believers—have shaped the meaning of contemporary Chinese society.

China

HIST 800, HSAR 746, MDVL 565

Circa 1000

Valerie Hansen, Mary Miller, Anders Winroth
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

The world in the year 1000, when the different regions of the world participated in complex networks. Archaeological excavations reveal that the Vikings reached L’Anse aux Meadows, Canada, at roughly the same time that the Kitan people defeated China’s Song dynasty and established a powerful empire stretching across the grasslands of Eurasia. Viking chieftains donned Chinese silks while Chinese princesses treasured Baltic amber among their jewelry. In what is now the American Southwest, the people of Chaco Can­yon feasted on tropical chocolate, while the lords of Chichen Itza wore New Mexican turquoise—yet never knew the Huari lords of the central Andes. In this seminar, students read interpretative texts based on archaeology and primary sources, prepare projects in teams, work with material culture, and develop skills of cross-cultural analysis. Manda­tory field trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York on Saturday, January 21.

China, Transregional, South Asia

HIST 858

Readings in Qing Documents

Peter C. Perdue
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This course is an introduction to the use of documents from the Qing dynasty. We exam­ine selected archival and published materials, and discuss how to develop research proj­ects from primary source materials.

China

HIST 887

Research in Japanese History

Fabian Drixler
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

This seminar on Japan’s early modern and modern history has three parts. We first read a number of outstanding books and articles to inform and inspire our own research agenda. We then familiarize ourselves with the different types of sources and reference materials. The final six weeks of the course are devoted to individual research projects, which we hone through several cycles of presentations, drafts, and peer review. While the course is designed for graduate students with a reading knowledge of Japanese, it welcomes participants who want to pursue a Japan-centered project with sources in other languages.

Japan

HIST 893, EALL 871, EAST 593

History of China’s Republican Period

Denise Ho
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

This reading seminar examines recent English-language scholarship on China’s Republi­can period (1912–1949) covering themes from state and economy to society and culture. Weekly topics include state institutions and law, nationalism, politics and political move­ments, the development of cities, media and publication, public health, education, labor, and rural reconstruction.

China

HSAR 142, RLST 187, SAST 265

Introduction to the History of Art: The Classical Buddhist World

Youn-mi Kim
T, Th 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Spring

Buddhist art and architecture of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and central Asia from earliest beginnings to the tenth century, and including Greco-Roman, Persian, and Islamic contact.

China, Transregional, South Asia

HSAR 353, EAST 353

Korean Art and Culture

Youn-mi Kim
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

The history of Korea from ancient times to the present, with a focus on art and culture. Intersections of art, religion, and politics, as well as interaction with Chinese and Japanese cultures. The transmission of Buddhism and the formation of early Korean kingdoms; controversies regarding national identity; the premodern porcelain industry; Buddhism and Confucianism in politics and aesthetics; religion and art of the Japanese colonial period; contemporary popular culture. Includes a visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Korea

HSAR 357

Art and Architecture of Japan

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Survey of Japanese art and architecture from earliest times through the early nineteenth century. Introduction to paradigmatic monuments, with a focus on programmatic multimedia ensembles as found at Buddhist temples, Shinto shrines, Zen monastic enclaves, military installations and castles, vernacular living spaces, and public institutions of governance.

Japan

HSAR 368

Practices of Japanese Painting and Printmaking

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Introduction to the Japanese painting and print traditions that inform Western modernism. Definition of specific formats, approaches, styles, and transitions. Paintings and prints as artifacts and as imaginative spaces in which social and cultural meanings unfold and can be analyzed in comparative perspective.

Japan

HSAR 480, EAST 470

The Arts of Nomads in China, 900-1400

Youn-mi Kim
Th 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Fall

Visual culture of the nomadic Kitans and Mongols, ranging from gold death masks and murals excavated from tombs to religious artworks that reflect hybrid and diverse religious practices. Arts produced during the empires founded by the Liao (907-1125) and Yuan (1279-1368) located in a broad transregional context, including their role in the cultural and political landscapes of East, Central, and South Asia from the tenth to fifteenth century.

Permission of instructor required.

China

HSAR 488

Buddhist Mandalas

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Study of Buddhist mandalas, objects such as paintings, relief sculptures, sand works, engravings on stone, and textiles that represent graphically what is written in scripture. Examination of Indian, Japanese, and Tibetan mandalas and the texts on which they are based. Focus on the intersection of text and image in the material or visual representation of Buddhist discourse.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Transregional, South Asia

HSAR 815

Momoyama Art in World Perspective

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Exploration of art practices in the time of Nobunaga and Hideyoshi, with emphasis on cross-cultural entanglements in the sixteenth century and the optics of the bizarre at the threshold of the early modern world. Coverage includes castle architecture and decoration, the intersection of European and Japanese pictorial modes and painting practices, Christian art in Japan, the tea ceremony and wabi taste, genre painting such as map screens and city views, and the oceanic motif in visual cultures of the early modern period.

Japan

JAPN 110

Elementary Japanese I

Koichi Hiroe, Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura, Aoi Saito, Mari Stever
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Introductory language course for students with no previous background in Japanese. Development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, including 50 hiragana, 50 katakana, and 75 kanji characters. Introduction to cultural aspects such as levels of politeness and group concepts. In-class drills in pronunciation and conversation. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

Credit only on completion of JAPN 120. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 120

Elementary Japanese II

Koichi Hiroe, Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura, Aoi Saito, Mari Stever
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 110, with supplementary materials such as excerpts from television shows, anime, and songs. Introduction of 150 additional kanji.

After JAPN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 130

Intermediate Japanese I

Yoshiko Maruyama, Masahiko Seto
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Continued development in both written and spoken Japanese. Aspects of Japanese culture, such as history, art, religion, and cuisine, explored through text, film, and animation. Online audio and visual aids facilitate listening, as well as the learning of grammar and kanji. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 140

Intermediate Japanese II

Yoshiko Maruyama, Masahiko Seto
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 130.

After JAPN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 150

Advanced Japanese I

Yoshiko Maruyama, Mari Stever
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Advanced language course that further develops proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Reading and discussion materials include works by Nobel Prize winners. Japanese anime and television dramas are used to enhance listening and to develop skills in culturally appropriate speech. Writing of essays, letters, and criticism solidifies grammar and style. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 140 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 151

Advanced Japanese II

Yoshiko Maruyama, Mari Stever
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 150.

After JAPN 150 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 156

Advanced Japanese III

Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Close reading of modern Japanese writing on current affairs, social science, history, and literature. Development of speaking and writing skills in academic settings, including formal speeches, interviews, discussions, letters, e-mail, and expository writing. Interviews of and discussions with native speakers on current issues. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 157

Advanced Japanese IV

Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 156.

After JAPN 156 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 162

Reading Academic Japanese I

Masahiko Seto
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Close reading of major writings from the Meiji era to the present, including newspaper articles, scholarly works, fiction, and prose. Students gain a command of academic Japanese through comprehensive study of grammar in the context of culture. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 157 or equivalent; recommended to be taken after or concurrently with JAPN 170.

Japan

JAPN 163

Reading Academic Japanese II

Masahiko Seto
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 162.

After JAPN 162 or equivalent; recommended to be taken after JAPN 170.

Japan

JAPN 164

Academic and Professional Spoken Japanese

Koichi Hiroe
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on the speaking skills necessary in academic and professional settings. Includes online interviews, discussions, and debates with native Japanese students and scholars on contemporary topics such as globalization, environment, technology, human rights, and cultural studies. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 163 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 165

Academic and Professional Spoken Japanese

Koichi Hiroe
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on the speaking skills necessary in academic and professional settings. Includes online interviews, discussions, and debates with native Japanese students and scholars on contemporary topics such as globalization, environment, technology, human rights, and cultural studies. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 163 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 170

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Edward Kamens
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 570

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Edward Kamens
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 571

Readings in Literary Japanese


HTBA
Spring

Close analytical reading of a selection of texts from the Nara through Tokugawa period: prose, poetry, and various genres. Introduction of kanbun.

After JAPN 570 or equivalent.

Japan

KREN 110

Elementary Korean I

Angela Lee-Smith, David Malinowki
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

A beginning course in modern Korean. Pronunciation, lectures on grammar, conversation practice, and introduction to the writing system (Hankul).

Credit only on completion of KREN 120. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 120

Elementary Korean II

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 110.

After KREN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 130

Intermediate Korean I

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Continued development of skills in modern Korean, spoken and written, leading to intermediate-level proficiency.

After KREN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 132

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners I

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Intended for students with some oral proficiency but little or no training in Hankul. Focus on grammatical analysis, the standard spoken language, and intensive training in reading and writing.

This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 140

Intermediate Korean II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 130.

After KREN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 142

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 132.

After KREN 132 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 152

Advanced Korean for Advanced Learners

Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An advanced course in modern Korean. Reading of short stories, essays, and journal articles, and introduction of 200 Chinese characters. Students develop their speaking and writing skills through discussions and written exercises.

After KREN 142 or 151, or with permission of instructor.

Korea

KREN 154

Advanced Korean III

Seungja Choi
W 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Spring

An advanced language course designed to develop reading and writing skills using Web-based texts in a variety of genres. Students read texts independently and complete comprehension and vocabulary exercises through the Web. Discussions, tests, and intensive writing training in class.

After KREN 151 or equivalent.

Korea

LAW 21179

Chinese Law and Policy: Independent Research

Students will undertake independent research and writing related to legal and policy reform in China or U.S.-China relations. 

Paper required. Permission of the instructor required. 1-3 units.

China

PLSC 162

Japan and the World

Frances McCall Rosenbluth
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The historical development of Japan’s international relations since the late Tokugawa period; World War II and its legacy; domestic institutions and foreign policy; implications for the United States; and interactions between nationalism and regionalism.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

PLSC 678

Japan and the World

Frances McCall Rosenbluth
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The historical development of Japan’s international relations since the late Tokugawa period; World War II and its legacy; domestic institutions and foreign policy; implications for the United States; and interactions between nationalism and regionalism.

Japan

REL 917H

East Asian Religions and Ecology

John Grim, Mary Evelyn Tucker
W 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Spring

This hybrid online course introduces the East Asian religious traditions of Confucianism, Daoism, and East Asian Buddhism in relation to the emerging field of religion and ecology. This overview course identifies developments in the traditions that highlight their ecological implications in the contemporary period. In particular, it relates religious concepts, textual analysis, ritual activities, and institutional formations to engaged, on-the-ground environmental projects. It investigates the symbolic and lived expressions in religious ethics and practices that can be defined as religious ecologies. Similarly, it identifies narratives in Confucianism, Daoism, and East Asian Buddhism that orient humans to the cosmos, namely, religious cosmologies. This interrelationship of narratives and religious environmentalism provides pathways into the study of religion and ecology.

This is a six-week course.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

REL 940

The Chinese Theologians

Chloe Starr
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This course examines select readings from Chinese church and academic theologians (including Hong Kong writers and diaspora voices) to explore the nature of Chinese Christian thought. The readings cover late imperial Roman Catholic writers, early republican Protestant thinkers, high communist-era church theologians, and contemporary Sino-Christian academic theologians. Students read primary materials in English, supplemented by background studies and lecture material to help make sense of the theological constructions that emerge. The course encourages reflection on the challenges for Christian mission in a communist context, on the tensions between church and state in the production of theologies, and on the challenges that Chinese Christianity poses for global Christian thought.

China

REL 941

Chinese and Japanese Christian Literature

Chloe Starr
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

What effect did Christianity have on modern Chinese literature, if any, and what sort of Christianity emerges from Chinese Christian literature? Is Endo Shusaku the only Japanese Christian writer (and does Martin Scorsese’s film do justice to his novel Silence)? This course traces the development of a Christian literature in China and Japan from late Imperial times to the end of the twentieth century, with particular focus on the heyday (in China) of the 1920s and ’30s, and on the Japanese side, on Endo’s postwar novels. Using texts available in English, the class examines how Christian ideas and metaphors permeated the literary—and revolutionary—imagination in East Asia. The influence of Christianity on literature came directly through the Bible and church education, and indirectly through translated European and Western literature, but it is rarely clearly in evidence. The course tests the aesthetic visions and construction of the human being in the early Republic, among Japanese samurai in Mexico, and in the martyrs of Nagasaki.

China, Japan, Transregional

RLST 020

Himalayan Pilgrimage

Andrew Quintman
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Exploration of the many ways in which the Himalayan landscape has been imagined as circumscribing a sacred space, from traditional literature to multi-media representations of popular Western culture. Critical inquiry of Buddhist traditions, religious texts, and ritual practices in Tibet, Nepal, North India, and Bhutan; the mythos of Tibet as Shangri-la; and the status of pilgrimage in contemporary Himalayan culture.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required. Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional, South Asia

RLST 135, EAST 335

Zen Buddhism

Eric Greene
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Survey of the history and teachings of Zen Buddhism in China and Japan. Emphasis on reading and interpretation of primary Zen texts in their historical and religious context, along with investigation of modern interpretations and appropriations of Zen in the West.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Transregional

RLST 182, SAST 459

Buddhist Traditions of Mind and Meditation

Andrew Quintman
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Buddhist meditation practices examined in the context of traditional theories of mind, perception, and cognition. Readings both from Buddhist canonical works and from secondary scholarship on cognitive science and ritual practice.

Recommended preparation: a course in Asian religions. Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional, South Asia

RLST 383, SAST 467

Biography in Asian Religions

Andrew Quintman
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The significance of life writing in the religious traditions of Asia. Readings both from primary texts in translation and from theoretical works on biography and autobiography.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

RLST 545

Chinese Buddhist Meditation: Texts and Contexts

Eric Greene
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

An introduction to key Chinese texts pertaining to the practice of Buddhist meditation, including texts from the Chan, Tiantai, and Pure Land traditions. Some Daoist medita­tion texts are also examined for comparison, and secondary readings on the topics of mysticism and religious experience are assigned. 

All primary readings are in Chinese.

China

RLST 565, SAST 559

Buddhist Traditions of Mind and Meditation

Andrew Quintman
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Buddhist meditation practices examined in the context of traditional theories of mind, perception, and cognition. Readings both from Buddhist canonical works and from secondary scholarship on cognitive science and ritual practice.

China, Transregional, South Asia, Tibet

RLST 583, SAST 567

Biography in Asian Religions

Andrew Quintman
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The significance of life writing in the religious traditions of Asia. Readings both from primary texts in translation and from theoretical works on biography and autobiography.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

SOCY 086

China in the Age of Xi Jinping

Deborah Davis
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

An overview of the major social institutions in contemporary China, with a focus on the changing relationship between individual and society. Use of print and visual sources to explore the social consequences of China’s recent retreat from socialism and its rapid integration into the global economy.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required. Permission of instructor required.

China

SOCY 395, EAST 408, EP&E 269

Wealth and Poverty in Modern China

Deborah Davis
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The underlying causes and consequences of the changing distribution of income, material assets, and political power in contemporary China. Substantive focus on inequality and stratification. Instruction in the use of online Chinese resources relevant to research. Optional weekly Chinese language discussions.

Prerequisite: a previous course on China since 1949. Permission of instructor required.

China

SOCY 596

Wealth and Poverty in Modern China

Deborah Davis
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The underlying causes and consequences of the changing distribution of income, material assets, and political power in contemporary China. Substantive focus on inequality and stratification. Instruction in the use of online Chinese resources relevant to research. Optional weekly Chinese language discussions.

Prerequisite: a previous course on China since 1949.

China