CEAS Courses 2015-2016

This list is subject to modification.

Some of the information contained here may have changed since the time of publication. Always check with the department under which the course is listed or on the official Yale Online Course Information website to make sure that the courses you are interested in are still being offered and that the times have not changed. Course information is also available on the Yale Blue Book website.

If you have questions about any of the courses listed here, please contact the offering department directly.

ANTH 170

Chinese Culture, Society, and History

Helen Siu
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Anthropological explorations of basic institutions in traditional and contemporary Chinese society. Topics include kinship and marriage, religion and ritual, economy and social stratification, state culture, socialist revolution, and market reform.

China

ANTH 234 , WGSS 234

Disability and Culture

Karen Nakamura
HTBA
Spring

Exploration of disability from a cross-cultural perspective, using examples from around the globe. Disability as it relates to identity, culture, law, and politics. Case studies may include deafness in Japan, wheelchair mobility in the United States, and mental illness in the former Soviet republics.

Permission of instructor required. This course meets during reading period.

Japan, Transregional

ANTH 254

Japan: Culture, Society, Modernity

William Kelly
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to Japanese society and culture. The historical development of Japanese society; family, work, and education in contemporary Japan; Japanese aesthetics; and psychological, sociological, and cultural interpretations of Japanese behavior.

Japan

ANTH 355 , AFST 355

China-Africa Encounters

Helen Siu
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

The history, effects, and implications of Chinese involvement in and with African countries over the past century. Diasporic experiences, with attention to informal economies, cultural strategies, and ethnic and religious tensions; land, finance, and infrastructure; Chinese aid and development in Africa since the late 1960s, including medical aid and charitable groups.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional

ANTH 397, ARCG 397

Archaeology of East Asia

Anne Underhill
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Introduction to the findings and practice of archaeology in China, Japan, Korea, and southeast Asia. Methods used by archaeologists to interpret social organization, economic organization, and ritual life. Attention to major transformations such as the initial peopling of an area, establishment of farming villages, the development of cities, interregional interactions, and the nature of political authority.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, Southeast Asia

ANTH 414

Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations; class, gender, ethnicity, and migration; and global landscapes of power and citizenship.

Permission of instructor required. This course meets during reading period.

China, Transregional

ANTH 541, F&ES 836, HIST 965, PLSC 779

Agrarian Societies: Culture, Society, History, and Development

An interdisciplinary examination of agrarian societies, contemporary and historical, Western and non-Western. Major analytical perspectives from anthropology, economics, history, political science, and environmental studies are used to develop a meaning-centered and historically grounded account of the transformations of rural society.

Team Taught

China, Transregional, South Asia

ANTH 555

China-Africa Encounters

Helen Siu
HTBA
Spring

This seminar focuses on layered structures that linked China and Africa in a broad “Asian” context. It cuts through policy polemics to provide historically informed and ethno­graphically nuanced perspectives. The density and diversity of Chinese activities in Africa have grown dramatically in the past decade, colored by volatile markets and the global reach of China for oil and for agricultural and mineral commodities. Themes to explore include diasporic experiences (informal economies, cultural strategies, ethnic and reli­gious tensions in migrant communities); land, finance, infrastructure, and daily lives (the intertwined worlds of state planners, global investors, and local communities); and the meaning of aid and development (comparisons between postcolonial, neoliberal and late-socialist models and long-term societal impact).

China, Transregional

ANTH 575

Hubs, Mobilities, and the Global Urban

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations, class, gender, ethnicity, migration, and global land­scapes of power and citizenship.

China, Transregional

ANTH 741, ARCG 741, CLSS 841, HIST 502, NELC 841

Frontier and Province in the Premodern World

From Achaemenid India or Han China to Roman Gaul and Egypt to Iraqi Kurdistan, the province and its organizational equivalents (e.g., nomes in Egypt, commanderies in China) have long constituted one of the fundamental building blocks of states, ancient and modern, and a fascinatingly complex site of cultural and political negotiation in imperial encounters. The aim of this year’s core seminar is to explore social equilibria between governance and the governed in the premodern world, via the interaction— religious, artistic, linguistic, administrative, economic—between local units and large imperial frameworks. As an object of comparative study, the province, representing the intersection of imperial power and local communities, allows us to combine “top-down” and “bottom-up” approaches to the ancient world, to investigate some of the key practices and discourses of empire while attempting to recover the agency and voices of subaltern provincial actors. It offers as well a chance to reconsider the “center-periphery” paradigm taken over from world-systems theory, and to propose new models for understanding the complex relationships between an imperial “center” and the governance of territories. This interdisciplinary seminar examines a wide range of aspects of the province as a tran­shistorical phenomenon—law, economy, art, literature, religion, monumentality, urban­ism, and politics—across the ancient Mediterranean world and beyond, making use of the unique resources and collections at Yale, especially the Art Gallery and Beinecke Library.

China, Transregional

ANTH 797, ARCG 797

Archaeology of East Asia

Anne Underhill
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the findings and practice of archaeology in China, Japan, Korea, and southeast Asia. Methods used by archaeologists to interpret social organization, economic organization, and ritual life. Attention to major transformations such as the initial peopling of an area, establishment of farming villages, the development of cities, interregional interactions, and the nature of political authority.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, Southeast Asia

ANTH 941

Research Seminar in Japan Anthropology

The seminar offers professional preparation for doctoral students in Japan anthropology through systematic readings and analysis of the anthropological literature, in English and in Japanese.

Permission of the instructor required.

Japan

ANTH 941

Research Seminar in Japan Anthropology

The seminar offers professional preparation for doctoral students in Japan anthropology through systematic readings and analysis of the anthropological literature, in English and in Japanese.

Permission of the instructor required.

Japan

CHNS 110

Elementary Modern Chinese I

Min Chen, Jianhua Shen, Chuanmei Sun, Yu-Lin Saussy
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Intended for students with no background in Chinese. An intensive course with emphasis on spoken language and drills. Pronunciation, grammatical analysis, conversation practice, and introduction to reading and writing Chinese characters.

Credit only on completion of CHNS 120b. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 120

Elementary Modern Chinese II

Min Chen, Jianhua Shen, Chuanmei Sun, Yu-Lin Saussy
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 110.

After CHNS 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 130

Intermediate Modern Chinese I

Ninghui Liang, Ling Mu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An intermediate course that continues intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and consolidates achievements from the first year of study. Students improve oral fluency, study more complex grammatical structures, and enlarge both reading and writing vocabulary.

After CHNS 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 132

Elementary Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners I

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Fan Liu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

First level of the advanced learner sequence, intended for students with some aural proficiency but limited ability in reading and writing Chinese. Training in listening and speaking, with emphasis on reading and writing.

Placement confirmed by placement test and by instructor. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 140

Intermediate Modern Chinese II

Ninghui Liang, Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 130. To be followed by CHNS 150.

After CHNS 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 142

Elementary Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners II

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Fan Liu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 132.

After CHNS 132 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 150

Advanced Modern Chinese I

Rongzhen Li, Ling Mu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Third level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Use of audiovisual materials, oral presentations, skits, and longer and more frequent writing assignments to assimilate more sophisticated grammatical structures. Further introduction to a wide variety of written forms and styles. Use of both traditional and simplified forms of Chinese characters.

After CHNS 140 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 151

Advanced Modern Chinese II

Rongzhen Li, Ling Mu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 PM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 150.

After CHNS 150 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 152

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Haiwen Wang
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate to advanced oral proficiency and high elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them.

After CHNS 142 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 153

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Haiwen Wang
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate to advanced oral proficiency and high elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them.

After CHNS 142 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 154

Advanced Modern Chinese III

William Zhou
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Fourth level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Readings in a wide range of subjects form the basis of discussion and other activities. Students consolidate their skills, especially speaking proficiency, at an advanced level. Materials use both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 151 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 155

Advanced Modern Chinese IV

William Zhou
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 154.

After CHNS 154 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 162

Advanced Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Wei Su
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Third level of the advanced learner sequence in Chinese. Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills (able to conduct conversations fluently) and with high intermediate reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000–1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 153 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 163

Advanced Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Wei Su
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Third level of the advanced learner sequence in Chinese. Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills (able to conduct conversations fluently) and with high intermediate reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000-1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 153 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 164

Readings in Contemporary Chinese Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Selected readings in Chinese fiction of the 1980s and 1990s. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 165

Readings in Modern Chinese Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Reading and discussion of modern short stories, most written prior to 1949. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 166

Chinese Media and Society

William Zhou
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on speaking and writing skills. Issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as newspapers, radio, television, and Internet blogs.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 167

Chinese Media and Society

William Zhou
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on speaking and writing skills. Issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as newspapers, radio, television, and Internet blogs.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 168

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Min Chen
HTBA
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 169

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Min Chen
HTBA
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 170

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Michael Hunter
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, CHNS 153, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 171

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 170.

After CHNS 170. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 212

Ancient Chinese Thought

Michael Hunter
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

An introduction to the foundational works of ancient Chinese thought from the ruling ideologies of the earliest historical dynasties, through the Warring States masters, to the Qin and Han empires. Topics include Confucianism and Daoism, the role of the intellectual in ancient Chinese society, and the nature and performance of wisdom.

China

CHNS 512

Ancient Chinese Thought

Michael Hunter
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

An introduction to the foundational works of ancient Chinese thought, from the rul­ing ideologies of the earliest historical dynasties through the diverse writings of the Warring States “masters” and including intellectual developments under the Qin and Han empires.

China

CHNS 570

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Michael Hunter
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, 153 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 571

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 570.

After CHNS 570 or equivalent.

China

EALL 200, HUMS 432

The Chinese Tradition

Tina Lu, Michael Hunter
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

An introduction to the literature, culture, and thought of premodern China, from the beginnings of the written record to the turn of the twentieth century. Close study of textual and visual primary sources, with attention to their historical and cultural backdrops.

No knowledge of Chinese required.

China

EALL 203, LITR 197

The Tale of Genji

Edward Kamens
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Spring

A reading of the central work of prose fiction in the Japanese classical tradition in its entirety (in English translation) along with some examples of predecessors, parodies, and adaptations (the latter include Noh plays and twentieth-century short stories). Topics of discussion include narrative form, poetics, gendered authorship and readership, and the processes and premises that have given The Tale of Genji its place in “world literature.” Attention will also be given to the text’s special relationship to visual culture.

No knowledge of Japanese required. A previous college-level course in the study of literary texts is recommended but not required.

Japan

EALL 211, WGSS 405

Women and Literature in Traditional China

Kang-I Chang
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

A study of major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. The power of women’s writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; footbinding; notions of love and death; the aesthetics of illness; women and revolution; poetry clubs; the function of memory in women’s literature; problems of gender and genre.

Permission of instructor required. All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese. Formerly CHNS 201.

China

EALL 271, FILM 448

Japanese Cinema after 1960

Aaron Gerow
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM; Screenings M 7:00 PM
Fall

The development of Japanese cinema after the breakdown of the studio system, through the revival of the late 1990s, and to the present.

Permission of instructor required. No knowledge of Japanese required.

Japan

EALL 280, FILM 307

East Asian Martial Arts Film

Aaron Gerow
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM; Screenings T 7:00 PM
Spring

An investigation of the martial arts films of East Asia (Japan, China, Hong Kong, Korea, Taiwan), including the samurai film, kung-fu and karate film, and wuxia film, and the roles they play in constructing nationalism and transnationalism, gender, stardom, spirituality, and mediality.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, Hong Kong, Taiwan

EALL 300

Sinological Methods

Pauline Lin
Th 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Spring

A research course in Chinese studies, designed for students with background in modern and literary Chinese. Exploration and evaluation of the wealth of primary sources and research tools available in Chinese. For native speakers of Chinese, introduction to the secondary literature in English and instruction in writing professionally in English on topics about China. Topics include the compilation and development of Chinese bibliographies; bibliophiles’ notes; editions, censorship, and textual variation and reliability; specialized dictionaries; maps and geographical gazetteers; genealogies and biographical sources; archaeological and visual materials; and major Chinese encyclopedias and compendia.

After CHNS 171 or equivalent. Formerly CHNS 202. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 303

Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Fundamentals of classical Chinese poetry and poetics. Readings vary from year to year; topics include poetry and history, intertextuality, and poetic reception.

Permission of instructor required. Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. After CHNS 171 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Formerly CHNS 303.

China

EALL 351

Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese Literature

Jing Tsu
M 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

An introduction to literary criticism and history using texts in the original language. Fiction and nonfiction written in Chinese in different parts of the world, with a focus on the period from the nineteenth century to the present. Readings in Chinese; texts in both simplified and traditional characters.

Permission of instructor requried. After CHNS 163, 164, 165, or equivalent.

China

EALL 503

The Tale of Genji

Edward Kamens
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Spring

A reading of the central work of prose fiction in the Japanese classical tradition in its entirety (in English translation) along with some examples of predecessors, parodies, and adaptations (the latter include Noh plays and twentieth-century short stories). Topics of discussion include narrative form, poetics, gendered authorship and readership, and the processes and premises that have given The Tale of Genji its place in world literature. Attention is also given to the text’s special relationship to visual culture.

Japan

EALL 511

Women and Literature in Traditional China

Kang-I Chang
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

This course focuses on major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. Topics include the power of women’s writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; the cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; foot binding and its implications; women’s notion of love and death; the aesthetic of illness; women and revolution; women’s poetry clubs; the function of memory in women’s literature; problems of gender and genre.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese.

China

EALL 571, FILM 881

Japanese Cinema after 1960

Aaron Gerow
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM; Screenings M 7:00 PM
Fall

The development of Japanese cinema after the breakdown of the studio system, through the revival of the late 1990s, to the present.

Japan

EALL 580, FILM 872

East Asian Martial Arts Cinema

Aaron Gerow
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM; Screenings T 7:00 PM
Spring

An investigation of the martial arts films of East Asia (Japan, China, Hong Kong, Korea, Taiwan), including the samurai film, kung-fu and karate film, and wuxia film, and the roles they play in constructing nationalism and transnationalism, gender, stardom, spiri­tuality, and mediality.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, Taiwan

EALL 600

Sinological Methods

Pauline Lin
Th 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Spring

A research course in Chinese studies, designed for students with background in modern and literary Chinese. Exploration and evaluation of the wealth of primary sources and research tools available in Chinese. For native speakers of Chinese, introduction to the secondary literature in English and instruction in writing professionally in English on topics about China. Topics include the compilation and development of Chinese bibli­ographies; bibliophiles’ notes; editions, censorship, and textual variation and reliability; specialized dictionaries; maps and geographical gazetteers; genealogies and biographi­cal sources; archaeological and visual materials; and major Chinese encyclopedias and compendia.

China

EALL 603

Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Focus on fundamentals of classical Chinese poetry and poetics. Topics include poetry and cultural history, intertextuality, poetics of lyricism, etc.

Because readings are different each year, this course may be repeated for credit. Readings in Chinese, discussion in English. After CHNS 571 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

China

EALL 618

The Dream of the Red Chamber

Tina Lu
Th 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Fall

Close reading of the eighteenth-century Chinese novel The Dream of the Red Chamber in the original, with focus on nineteenth-century commentaries. The class culminates in the group translation of at least two classical-language commentaries.

China

EALL 651

Advanced Readings: Modern Chinese Literature

Jing Tsu
M 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

A rigorous introduction to literary criticism and analysis using texts in the original language. Focus on the contemporary period, drawing from fiction written in Chinese in different parts of the world, from mainland China to Taiwan and from Malaysia to Hong Kong. Texts in both simplified and traditional characters. Topic for 2015: Lu Xun.

China

EALL 740

Topics in Early Chinese Literature

Michael Hunter
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

An examination of key texts and problems in the study of early Chinese literature. Pri­mary sources vary from year to year but could include the Shijing, Chuci, Shiji, early sources of anecdotal literature, and the fu.

Discussions and papers are in English. This course may be repeated for credit.

China

EALL 803, CPLT 545

Sympathy and Its Limits

Jing Tsu
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

It is said that the study of literature, unlike other disciplines, has the power to inspire and hone our capacity to feel for others. It trains us by putting us in hypothetical, affectively compelling but controlled worlds where we can experience, reflect, and analyze how we respond to those around us. This seminar tests that view by drawing on literary, social, archival, and theoretical texts, as well as modern accounts of atrocities and disasters in Western and non-Western contexts. Readings include Adam Smith, Lu Xun, Charles Darwin, Carlo Ginzburg, Mo Yan, Samantha Powers, Tokushi Kasahara, Yang Jisheng, Hannah Arendt, and Raul Hilberg.

China, Japan, Transregional

EALL 900

Directed Readings



Spring

Offered by permission of instructor and DGS to meet special needs not met by regular courses.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 900

Directed Readings



Fall

Offered by permission of instructor and DGS to meet special needs not met by regular courses.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 990

Directed Research



Fall

Offered as needed with permission of instructor and DGS for student preparation of dissertation prospectus.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 990

Directed Research



Spring

Offered as needed with permission of instructor and DGS for student preparation of dissertation prospectus.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 462, PLSC 397

The Politics and Political Economy of East Asia

This class is designed to help students understand political, economic, and diplomatic developments in East Asia with a focus on Japan, China, Korea, and Taiwan. We begin with the historical events that shaped the internal politics of each country and their international relations. We will explore the inter-relationship between their politics and their paths of economic development.  Finally, we consider their uneasy relationships as neighbors in East Asia.

Permission of instructor required

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, Taiwan

EAST 463, EALL 284, FILM 384

North Korea through Film


HTBA
Fall

Introduction to the cultural history of North Korea, with a focus on the politics, ethics, and aesthetics of visual representation. Styles and forms range from independent documentary to official propaganda to big-budget studio films. The fundamentals of film analysis; major texts on North Korea’s society, history, and political system.

Permission of instructor required.

Korea

EAST 464, HIST 306J

Japan and the Ocean, 1600-Present


HTBA
Spring

This course is an ocean-centered history of early modern and modern Japan (roughly 1600 to the present). We will look at how people have made use of land and sea, and how those practices have changed with political unification, political revolution, the growth of an empire, and the aftermath of an empire. Topics to be covered include piracy, fisheries diplomacy, sushi, pollution, and nuclear power.

Japan

EAST 465, EALL 235

Writing and Textual Culture in China and Beyond


HTBA
Fall

In this course we consider the development of writings and writing practices, and the ways in which they have been regulated by and interacted with the material, social, intellectual, and ideological dimensions of an encompassing textual culture in China. Our discussions consider how these processes operated, from oracle bones to electronic input systems and their effects on the written language. Our exploration spans continents and millennia, but will focus on the textual culture in China between 200 and 1000 AD - a period during which writing played an ever-increasing role in people’s lives - and its enduring influence in East Asia and beyond.

China

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 491

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 492

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 562, PLSC 789

The Politics & Political Economy of East Asia

This class is designed to help students understand political, economic, and diplomatic developments in East Asia with a focus on Japan, China, Korea, and Taiwan. We begin with the historical events that shaped the internal politics of each country and their inter­national relations. We explore the interrelationship between their politics and their paths of economic development. Finally, we consider their uneasy relationships as neighbors in East Asia.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, Taiwan

EAST 900

Master’s Thesis

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 910

Independent Study

By arrangement with faculty and with approval of the DGS.

China, Japan, Transregional

GLBL 312, EAST 454, ECON 474

Economic and Policy Lessons from Japan

Stephen Roach
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

An evaluation of Japan’s protracted economic problems and of their potential implications for other economies, including the United States, Europe, and China. Currency pressures, policy blunders, Abenomics, bubbles, and the global economic crisis of 2008; dangers to the global economy from a protracted postcrisis recovery period. Focus on policy remedies to avert similar problems in other countries.

Permission of instructor required. Prerequisite: a course in macroeconomics.

Japan

GLBL 318, EAST 338, ECON 338

The Next China

Stephen Roach
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Economic development in China since the late 1970s. Emphasis on factors pushing China toward a transition from its modern export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. The possibility of a resulting identity crisis, underscored by China’s need to embrace political reform and by the West’s long-standing misperceptions of China.

Prerequisite: introductory macroeconomics.

China

GLBL 618, MGT 911

The Next China

Stephen Roach
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Born out of necessity in the post-Cultural Revolution chaos of the late 1970s, modern China is about reforms, opening up, and transition. The Next China will be driven by the transition from an export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. China’s new model could unmask a dual identity crisis—underscored by China’s need to embrace political reform and the West’s long-standing misperceptions about China.

Prerequisite: basic undergraduate macroeconomics.

China

HIST 030, EAST 030, HUMS 083

Tokyo

Fabian Drixler
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Four centuries of Japan’s history explored through the many incarnations, destructions, and rebirths of its foremost city. Focus on the solutions found by Tokyo’s residents to the material and social challenges of concentrating such a large population in one place. Tensions between continuity and impermanence, authenticity and modernity, and social order and the culture of play.

Freshman seminar. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

HIST 032, EAST 032

Shanghai


T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

History of the city of Shanghai, with a focus on how Shanghai has been seen and what its experience reveals about modern China. Shanghai’s unique place in imagining China; its transformation in the nineteenth century from a fishing village to an international “treaty port” and China’s gateway to the West; twentieth-century Shanghai as a site of innovation, from politics and capitalism to media and fashion; the city’s vilification in the early Mao years and later reemergence as a symbol of China’s modernization.

Freshman seminar. Permission of instructor required.

China

HIST 307, EAST 301

The Making of Japan's Great Peace, 1550-1850

Fabian Drixler
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Examination of how, after centuries of war in Japan and overseas, the Tokugawa shogunate built a peace that lasted more than 200 years. Japan’s urban revolution, the eradication of Christianity, the Japanese discovery of Europe, and the question whether Tokugawa Japan is a rare example of a complex and populous society that achieved ecological sustainability.

Japan

HIST 308J

History and Politics in Early China

Annping Chin
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

How the history and politics of early China came to shape political thinking and policy debates in two thousand years of imperial rule.

Permission of instructor required.

China

HIST 309J, EAST 309

Uses of the Past in Modern China


M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Modern China’s use of the past in state-sponsored narratives of nation, in attempts to construct heritage by elites and intellectuals, and in grassroots projects of remembrance. Theories on history and memory; primary sources in English translation; case studies from twentieth-century China. Interdisciplinary readings in art history, anthropology, cultural studies, and history.

Permission of instructor required.

China

HIST 366

History of Cities in Modern Asia

Peter C. Perdue
T,Th 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Fall

The history of Asian cities, with emphasis on long-term processes of urbanization and the daily life of hundreds of millions of people. Focus on China, now home to six of the world’s thirty largest cities. Includes discussion of Japan, India, and related areas as well.

China, Japan, Transregional, South Asia

HIST 373

The Silk Road

Valerie Hansen
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

A journey along the overland and sea routes that connected China, India, and Iran from 200 to 1000 C.E. and served as conduits for cultural exchange. The lives of merchants, envoys, pilgrims, and travelers interacting in cosmopolitan communities. Exploration of long-known and newly discovered archaeological ruins, along with primary sources in translation.

China, Transregional, South Asia

HIST 375, EAST 375

China from Mao to Now


M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

The history of the People’s Republic of China from Mao to now, with a focus on understanding the recent Chinese past and framing contemporary events in China in historical context. How the party-state is organized; interactions between state and society; causes and consequences of economic disparities; ways in which various groups—from intellectuals to religious believers—have shaped the meaning of contemporary Chinese society.

China

HIST 379J, HSHM 447

History of Chinese Science

William Summers
W 7:00 PM - 8:50 PM
Fall

Major themes in Chinese scientific thinking from antiquity to the twentieth century. Non-Western concepts of nature and the development of science in China; East-West scientific exchanges; and China’s role in modern science.

Permission of instructor required. This course meets during reading period.

China

HIST 869

Issues in Tang, Song, and Yuan History

Valerie Hansen
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

A survey of the historical genres of premodern China: the dynastic histories, other chron­icles, gazetteers, literati notes, and Buddhist and Daoist canons. How to determine what different information these sources contain for research topics in different fields.

Prerequisite: at least one term of classical Chinese.

China

HIST 871, EAST 571

The History of the People’s Republic of China


M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This is a reading seminar that examines recent English-language scholarship on the People’s Republic of China, focusing on the Mao period (1949–76). Considering the question of the PRC as history, the seminar compares present-day scholarship to earlier social science research and discusses the questions being asked and answered by histori­ans today.

Reading knowledge of Chinese is not required; open to undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

China

HIST 874

East Asian Studies Research Seminar

Peter C. Perdue
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

This course focuses on developing skills needed for academic writing in East Asian stud­ies, including preparation of thesis prospectuses, research papers, and grant proposals. We begin with discussions of recent trends in the East Asian modern history and litera­ture fields, and of academic writing styles. Students then draft projects for presentation to the class.

Prerequisite: knowledge of modern Chinese or Japanese; open to under¬graduate majors in East Asian Studies with permission of the instructor.

China, Japan, Transregional

HIST 877

Readings in Modern Chinese History

Peter C. Perdue
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

In this course we read and discuss recent English-language monographs on modern Chinese history. The primary focus is topics that span the Qing to twentieth century and contain international, transnational, and comparative implications.

No knowledge of Chinese required; open to undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

China

HIST 878

Readings in Japanese History to 1900

Fabian Drixler
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

A critical introduction to debates in the history of Japan up to about 1900, with particular emphasis on the Tokugawa and Meiji periods but some coverage of earlier times as well. This year’s seminar focuses particularly on debates in social, economic, and environmental history.

Readings are in English but, depending on student interest, supplemental materials may also be assigned in Japanese.

Japan

HIST 885

Readings in the History of Nineteenth-Century Japan

Daniel Botsman
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

An overview of the historiography of the Tokugawa-Meiji transition and the beginnings of Japan’s emergence as a modern world power.

May include readings in Japanese as well as English.

Japan

HIST 891, EALL 772

Readings in the Intellectual History & Political Thought of the Qing Dynasty

Annping Chin
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

The course focuses on the historical and political writings in China’s last dynasty. The readings include the works of reformers, intellectual historians, and political theorists, from the beginning of the Qing (Huang Zongxi and Gu Yanwu), through the middle period (Dai Zhen and Zhang Xuecheng), to its conclusion (Wei Yuan, Yan Fu, Kang Youwei, and Liang Qichao).

Readings in Chinese and English.

China

HIST 911, HSHM 680

History of Chinese Science

William Summers
W 7:00 PM - 8:50 PM
Fall

Major themes in Chinese scientific thinking from antiquity to the twentieth century. Non-Western concepts of nature and the development of science in China; East-West scientific exchanges; and China’s role in modern science.

China

HSAR 142, RLST 187, SAST 265

Introduction to the History of Art: The Classical Buddhist World

Youn-mi Kim
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Buddhist art and architecture of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and central Asia from earliest beginnings to the tenth century, and including Greco-Roman, Persian, and Islamic contact.

China, Transregional, South Asia

HSAR 351

Chinese Landscape Painting

Youn-mi Kim
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Historical overview of Chinese landscape painting from the fourth to the twentieth century, with an emphasis on stylistic development. Painting theory and aesthetics; social discourse related to landscape painting in premodern Chinese intellectual history; the Chinese response to Western art in modern times. Examination of paintings from the Yale University Art Gallery.

China

HSAR 357

Art and Architecture of Japan

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

,

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Survey of Japanese art and architecture from earliest times through the early nineteenth century. Introduction to paradigmatic monuments, with a focus on programmatic multimedia ensembles as found at Buddhist temples, Shinto shrines, Zen monastic enclaves, military installations and castles, vernacular living spaces, and public institutions of governance.

Japan

HSAR 453

Textiles of Asia, 800–1800 C.E.

Ruth Barnes
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Survey of the great textile traditions of China, India, and the Islamic world from the ninth through eighteenth centuries C.E. The roles of central and southeast Asia in the transmission of styles and techniques. The cultural meaning, mobility, and cross-cultural significance of textiles in Asia. Extensive use of the Yale University Art Gallery’s textile collections.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional, South Asia

HSAR 475

Chinese Painting in the Seventeenth Century

David Sensabaugh
Th 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Spring

Chinese painting from the masters of the late Ming period to the individualist and orthodox masters of the early Qing dynasty. Issues of art based on either art or nature. Attention to paintings from the period in the Yale University Art Gallery collection.

Permission of instructor required.

China

HSAR 483

Chinese Funerary Art

Youn-mi Kim
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Examination of major Chinese tomb sites from the third century B.C.E. to the thirteenth century C.E., including the famous terracotta army of the First Emperor. Traces of religious rituals and of beliefs about the afterlife in funerary artworks; the relations among visual art, religious views, and social values.

Permission of instructor required.

China

HSAR 801

Time and Space in Buddhist Art

Youn-mi Kim
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Each religion has its own cosmology with a unique concept of time and space. The con­cept of time and space developed by East Asian Buddhists was related to, but distinct from, the Buddhist tradition of the religion’s home country of India, and it resulted in the birth of a new type of art and architecture in China, Korea, and Japan. Through exploration of East Asian Buddhist art, this course examines how East Asian Buddhists understood human life and death in the cycles of time and space, how they mapped hell and paradise in the cosmos, and how they attempted to visualize their perception of time and space in their art and architecture. In a larger context, the course examines the relationship among image, text, and practice in East Asian Buddhism through com­parative readings of visual images and texts. By the end of the term, students achieve an understanding of how the East Asian Buddhist view of the cosmos gave birth to various types of visual arts, and how those visual materials in turn influenced religious practices and experience.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

HSAR 809

Architecture and Audacity in Japan

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
W 10:30 AM - 12:20 PM
Fall

The architectural history of Japan is marked by occasional virtuosities of such scale and imagination, such as the Ise Shrine, as to defy the very traditions and practices whence they emerged. Such productions might be called audacities, in the sense that they engaged—beyond technological prowess and economic wherewithal—a visionary boldness that came close to achieving the impossible. This seminar explores the notion of the audacity and the impossible by examining some of Japan’s acclaimed architectural productions, including the tomb of King Nintoku, the Ise Shrine, T­ōdaiji Daibutsuden, the By­ōdōin Phoenix Hall, Itsukushima Shrine, Chū sonji Konjikidō, Kinkakuji, Himeji Castle, Rikyū’s Taian, Ninomaru Palace, Katsura Rikyū, and Tōshōgū.

Japan

JAPN 110

Elementary Japanese I

Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura, Aoi Saito
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Introductory language course for students with no previous background in Japanese. Development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, including 50 hiragana, 50 katakana, and 75 kanji characters. Introduction to cultural aspects such as levels of politeness and group concepts. In-class drills in pronunciation and conversation. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

Credit only on completion of JAPN 120. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 120

Elementary Japanese II

Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura, Aoi Saito
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 110, with supplementary materials such as excerpts from television shows, anime, and songs. Introduction of 150 additional kanji.

After JAPN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 130

Intermediate Japanese I

Yoshiko Maruyama, Masahiko Seto, Mari Stever
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Continued development in both written and spoken Japanese. Aspects of Japanese culture, such as history, art, religion, and cuisine, explored through text, film, and animation. Online audio and visual aids facilitate listening, as well as the learning of grammar and kanji. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 140

Intermediate Japanese II

Yoshiko Maruyama, Masahiko Seto, Mari Stever
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 130.

After JAPN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 150

Advanced Japanese I

Yoshiko Maruyama, Mari Stever
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Advanced language course that further develops proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Reading and discussion materials include works by Nobel Prize winners. Japanese anime and television dramas are used to enhance listening and to develop skills in culturally appropriate speech. Writing of essays, letters, and criticism solidifies grammar and style. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 140 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 151

Advanced Japanese II

Yoshiko Maruyama, Mari Stever
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 150.

After JAPN 150 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 156

Advanced Japanese III

Koichi Hiroe, Hiroyo Nishimura
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Close reading of modern Japanese writing on current affairs, social science, history, and literature. Development of speaking and writing skills in academic settings, including formal speeches, interviews, discussions, letters, e-mail, and expository writing. Interviews of and discussions with native speakers on current issues. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 157

Advanced Japanese IV

Koichi Hiroe, Hiroyo Nishimura
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 156.

After JAPN 156 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 162

Reading Academic Japanese I

Masahiko Seto
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Close reading of major writings from the Meiji era to the present, including newspaper articles, scholarly works, fiction, and prose. Students gain a command of academic Japanese through comprehensive study of grammar in the context of culture. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 157 or equivalent; recommended to be taken after or concurrently with JAPN 170.

Japan

JAPN 163

Reading Academic Japanese II

Masahiko Seto
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 162.

After JAPN 162 or equivalent; recommended to be taken after JAPN 170.

Japan

JAPN 164

Academic and Professional Spoken Japanese

Koichi Hiroe
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on the speaking skills necessary in academic and professional settings. Includes online interviews, discussions, and debates with native Japanese students and scholars on contemporary topics such as globalization, environment, technology, human rights, and cultural studies. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 163 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 165

Academic and Professional Spoken Japanese

Koichi Hiroe
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on the speaking skills necessary in academic and professional settings. Includes online interviews, discussions, and debates with native Japanese students and scholars on contemporary topics such as globalization, environment, technology, human rights, and cultural studies. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 163 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 170

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Edward Kamens
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 171

Readings in Literary Japanese

William Fleming
M,W 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Close analytical reading of a selection of texts from the Nara through the Tokugawa periods: prose, poetry, and various genres. Introduction to kanbun.

After JAPN 170 or equivalent. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

JAPN 570

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Edward Kamens
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 571

Readings in Literary Japanese

William Fleming
M,W 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Close analytical reading of a selection of texts from the Nara through Tokugawa period: prose, poetry, and various genres. Introduction of kanbun.

After JAPN 570 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 707

Readings in Genji monogatari

Edward Kamens
M 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Spring

Close study of selected chapters and consultation in a variety of commentaries and cri­tiques. Students carry out research projects on topics of their choice.

Prerequisite: at least one year of study of literary (classical) Japanese or the equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 720

Studies in Premodern Japanese Literature

Edward Kamens
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

A research seminar. Students pursue individual topics in pre-seventeenth-century literature and share readings and analyses for discussion on a rotating basis.

Prerequisite: proficiency in reading literary Japanese.

Japan

KREN 110

Elementary Korean I

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

A beginning course in modern Korean. Pronunciation, lectures on grammar, conversation practice, and introduction to the writing system (Hankul).

Credit only on completion of KREN 120. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 120

Elementary Korean II

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 110.

After KREN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 130

Intermediate Korean I

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Continued development of skills in modern Korean, spoken and written, leading to intermediate-level proficiency.

After KREN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 132

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners I

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Intended for students with some oral proficiency but little or no training in Hankul. Focus on grammatical analysis, the standard spoken language, and intensive training in reading and writing.

This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 140

Intermediate Korean II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 130.

After KREN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 142

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 132.

After KREN 132 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 152

Advanced Korean for Advanced Learners

Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

An advanced course in modern Korean. Reading of short stories, essays, and journal articles, and introduction of 200 Chinese characters. Students develop their speaking and writing skills through discussions and written exercises.

After KREN 142 or 151, or with permission of instructor.

Korea

KREN 154

Advanced Korean III

Seungja Choi
W 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Spring

An advanced language course designed to develop reading and writing skills using Web-based texts in a variety of genres. Students read texts independently and complete comprehension and vocabulary exercises through the Web. Discussions, tests, and intensive writing training in class.

After KREN 151 or equivalent.

Korea

LAW 20670

Chinese Law and Society


HTBA
Fall

This course will survey law and legal practice in the People’s Republic of China. Particular attention is given to the interaction of legal institutions with politics, social change, and economic development. Specific topics include, among others, the Party State, state capitalism, the judiciary, property law and development, business and investment law, criminal law and procedure, media (especially the Internet), and major schools of Chinese legal and political thought. Prior familiarity with Chinese history or politics is unnecessary but helpful.

All course materials will be in English. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. Permission of the instructor required. 2 units.

China

LAW 21179

Contemporary China Research Seminar

Research and writing on contemporary problems related to China, including but not limited to legal issues. The class will meet roughly six times during the semester to discuss particular China-related issues (occasionally with a guest) and at the end of the semester for student presentations of their research. The remainder of the semester the students will work on their research and writing projects and individually meet with the instructors to discuss their work. Students interested in the seminar should submit a statement of interest explaining their background related to China and research ideas that they are considering.

Paper required. Enrollment limited to ten. Permission of the instructor required. 3 units.

China

RLST 134, EALL TBD

Buddhism in China and Japan


M,W 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Introduction to Buddhism in East Asia through a close reading of original sources in translation. Focus on the lives and teachings of several leading monks. Topics include meditation, faith, rebirth, and secret rituals.

China, Japan, Transregional

RLST 564

The Study of Chinese Buddhism: Methods, History, and Perspectives


HTBA
Fall

This seminar provides an intensive introduction to the study of Chinese Buddhism in the Western academy. We read and discuss a variety of classic and contemporary English-language books and articles on the study of Chinese Buddhism. Our aim is both to gain a broad knowledge of the history and development of Chinese Buddhism (with a focus on the period through 1000 C.E.), and to critically evaluate how the most prominent scholars in the field of the past fifty years have approached this topic.

China

RLST 574

Chinese Buddhist Texts


Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Close reading of selected Chinese Buddhist texts in the original.

China