CEAS Courses 2017-2018

This list is subject to modification.

Some of the information contained here may have changed since the time of publication. Always check with the department under which the course is listed or on the official Yale Online Course Information website to make sure that the courses you are interested in are still being offered and that the times have not changed. Course information is also available on the Yale Blue Book website.

If you have questions about any of the courses listed here, please contact the offering department directly.

ANTH 254

Japan: Culture, Society, Modernity

Sarah LeBaron von Baeyer
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Introduction to Japanese society and culture. The historical development of Japanese society; family, work, and education in contemporary Japan; Japanese aesthetics; and psychological, sociological, and cultural interpretations of Japanese behavior.

Japan

ANTH 339

Urban Ethnography of Asia

Erik Harms
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Introduction to the anthropological study of contemporary Asian cities. Focus on new ethnographies about cities in East, Southeast, and South Asia. Topics include rural-urban migration, redevelopment, evictions, social movements, land grabbing, master-planned developments, heritage preservation, utopian aspirations, social housing, slums and precariousness, and spatial cleansing.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia

ANTH 414, EAST 417

Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Helen Siu, Sarah LeBaron von Baeyer
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations; class, gender, ethnicity, and migration; and global landscapes of power and citizenship.

Permission of instructor required. This course meets during reading period.

China, Transregional

ANTH 539

Urban Ethnographies of Asia

Erik Harms
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Introduction to the anthropological study of contemporary Asian cities. Focus on new ethnographies about cities in East, Southeast, and South Asia. Topics include rural-urban migration, redevelopment, evictions, social movements, land grabbing, master-planned developments, heritage preservation, utopian aspirations, social housing, slums and precariousness, and spatial cleansing.

China, Japan, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia

ANTH 541, F&ES 836, HIST 965, PLSC 779

Agrarian Societies: Culture, Society, History, and Development

An interdisciplinary examination of agrarian societies, contemporary and historical, Western and non-Western. Major analytical perspectives from anthropology, economics, history, political science, and environmental studies are used to develop a meaning-centered and historically grounded account of the transformations of rural society.

Team Taught

China, Transregional, South Asia

ANTH 575, EAST 575

Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Helen Siu, Sarah LeBaron von Baeyer
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations, class, gender, ethnicity, migration, and global landscapes of power and citizenship.

China, Transregional

ANTH 736, ARCG 736

Advanced Topics in Asian Archaeology

William Honeychurch
F 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

This seminar reviews the archaeology of Asia of the Pleistocene and Holocene epochs with emphasis on East, Southeast, and South Asia. Asian archaeology remains little known to most Western researchers, although some of the earliest hominid remains and some of the most powerful states are found in that part of the world. The course emphasizes the particularities of Asian cultural sequences, while illustrating how processes in these sequences compare to those found elsewhere in the world. The diverse Asian record provides a basis for refining key concepts in anthropological archaeology, including domestication, inequality and hierarchy, heterarchy, and complexity. Topics to be covered include history and theory in Asian archaeology; the Pleistocene and paleolithic record of Asia; origins of plant and animal domestication; early farming communities; models of complexity; and early states and empires.

China, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia

ANTH 759, ARCG 759

Social Complexity in Ancient China

Anne Underhill
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

This seminar explores the variety of archaeological methods and theoretical approaches that have been employed to investigate the development and nature of social complexity in ancient China. The session meetings focus on the later prehistoric and early historic periods, and several geographic regions are included. They also consider how developments in ancient China compare to other areas of the world. Most of the readings emphasize archaeological remains, although relevant information from early historical texts is considered.

China

ARCH 3240

Spatial Concepts of Japan

Yoko Kawai
W 2:00 PM - 3:50 PM
Fall

This seminar explores the origins and developments of Japanese spatial concepts and surveys how they help form the contemporary architecture, ways of life, and cities of the country. Many Japanese spatial concepts, such as MA, are about creating time-space distances and relationship between objects, people, space, and experiences. These concepts go beyond the fabric of a built structure, and encompass architecture, landscape, and city. Each class is designed around one or two Japanese words that signify particular design concepts. Each week, a lecture on the word(s) with its design features, backgrounds, historical examples, and contemporary application is followed by student discussion. Contemporary works studied include those by Maki, Isozaki, Ando, Ito, SANAA, and Fujimoto. The urbanism and landscape of Tokyo and Kyoto are discussed. Students are required to make in-class presentations and write a final paper. 

Limited enrollment

Japan

ARCH 341, GLBL 253, LAST 318

Globalization Space

Keller Easterling
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Infrastructure space as a primary medium of change in global polity. Networks of trade, energy, communication, transportation, spatial products, finance, management, and labor, as well as new strains of political opportunity that reside within their spatial disposition. Case studies include free zones and automated ports around the world, satellite urbanism in South Asia, high-speed rail in Japan and the Middle East, agripoles in southern Spain, fiber optic submarine cable in East Africa, spatial products of tourism in North Korea, and management platforms of the International Organization for Standardization.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

ARCH 4216, F&ES 782

Globalization Space

Keller Easterling
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Infrastructure space as a primary medium of change in global polity. Networks of trade, energy, communication, transportation, spatial products, finance, management, and labor, as well as new strains of political opportunity that reside within their spatial disposition. Case studies include free zones and automated ports around the world, satellite urbanism in South Asia, high-speed rail in Japan and the Middle East, agripoles in southern Spain, fiber optic submarine cable in East Africa, spatial products of tourism in North Korea, and management platforms of the International Organization for Standardization.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

CHNS 110

Elementary Modern Chinese I

Min Chen, Rongzhen Li, Jianhua Shen, Chuanmei Sun
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Intended for students with no background in Chinese. An intensive course with emphasis on spoken language and drills. Pronunciation, grammatical analysis, conversation practice, and introduction to reading and writing Chinese characters.

Credit only on completion of CHNS 120b. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 120

Elementary Modern Chinese II

Min Chen, Rongzhen Li, Jianhua Shen, Chuanmei Sun
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 110.

After CHNS 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 130

Intermediate Modern Chinese I

Ninghui Liang, Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An intermediate course that continues intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and consolidates achievements from the first year of study. Students improve oral fluency, study more complex grammatical structures, and enlarge both reading and writing vocabulary.

After CHNS 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 132

Elementary Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners I

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Fan Liu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

First level of the advanced learner sequence, intended for students with some aural proficiency but limited ability in reading and writing Chinese. Training in listening and speaking, with emphasis on reading and writing.

Placement confirmed by placement test and by instructor. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 140

Intermediate Modern Chinese II

Ninghui Liang, Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 130. To be followed by CHNS 150.

After CHNS 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 142

Elementary Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners II

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Fan Liu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 132.

After CHNS 132 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 150

Advanced Modern Chinese I

Yu-Lin Saussy, Yongtao Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Third level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Use of audiovisual materials, oral presentations, skits, and longer and more frequent writing assignments to assimilate more sophisticated grammatical structures. Further introduction to a wide variety of written forms and styles. Use of both traditional and simplified forms of Chinese characters.

After CHNS 140 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 151

Advanced Modern Chinese II

Yu-Lin Saussy, Yongtao Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 PM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 150.

After CHNS 150 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 152

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Haiwen Wang
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate to advanced oral proficiency and high elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them.

After CHNS 142 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 153

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Haiwen Wang
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate to advanced oral proficiency and high elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them.

After CHNS 142 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 154

Advanced Modern Chinese III

William Zhou
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Fourth level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Readings in a wide range of subjects form the basis of discussion and other activities. Students consolidate their skills, especially speaking proficiency, at an advanced level. Materials use both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 151 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 155

Advanced Modern Chinese IV

William Zhou
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 154.

After CHNS 154 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 162

Advanced Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Wei Su
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Third level of the advanced learner sequence in Chinese. Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills (able to conduct conversations fluently) and with high intermediate reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000–1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 153 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 163

Advanced Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Wei Su
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Third level of the advanced learner sequence in Chinese. Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills (able to conduct conversations fluently) and with high intermediate reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000-1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 153 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 164

Readings in Contemporary Chinese Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Selected readings in Chinese fiction of the 1980s and 1990s. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 165

Readings in Modern Chinese Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Reading and discussion of modern short stories, most written prior to 1949. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 166

Chinese Media and Society

William Zhou
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on speaking and writing skills. Issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as newspapers, radio, television, and Internet blogs.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 167

Chinese Media and Society

William Zhou
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on speaking and writing skills. Issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as newspapers, radio, television, and Internet blogs.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 168

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Min Chen
M,W,F 1:30 PM-2:20 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 169

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Min Chen
M,W,F 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 170

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Michael Hunter
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, CHNS 153, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 171

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 170.

After CHNS 170. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 570

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Michael Hunter
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, 153, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 571

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 570.

After CHNS 570 or equivalent.

China

EALL 050

Imperial Pleasure Parks and Private Gardens of China

Pauline Lin
M,W 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Study of imperial parks and private gardens in China, focusing on five historic times, spanning from the second century CE to modernity. Topics include the rationales, philosophies, and economics of constructing gardens; their designs; depictions in paintings and literature; their impact on the Chinese cultural imagination; modern commercial recreations of earlier gardens and environmental art; and the changing uses of gardens through time.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required. Permission required.

China

EALL 200, HUMS 270

The Chinese Tradition

Tina Lu
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

An introduction to the literature, culture, and thought of premodern China, from the beginnings of the written record to the turn of the twentieth century. Close study of textual and visual primary sources, with attention to their historical and cultural backdrops.

No knowledge of Chinese required.

China

EALL 210, LITR 172

Man and Nature in Chinese Literature

Kang-I Chang
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

An exploration of man and nature in traditional Chinese literature, with special attention to aesthetic and cultural meanings. Topics include the concept of nature and literature; neo-Taoist self-cultivation; poetry and Zen (Chan) Buddhism; travel in literature; loss, lament, and self-reflection in song lyrics; nature and the supernatural in classical tales; love and allusions to nature; religious pilgrimage and allegory.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese. Formerly CHNS 200.

China

EALL 211, LITR 174, WGSS 405

Women and Literature in Traditional China

Kang-I Chang
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

A study of major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. The power of women’s writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; footbinding; notions of love and death; the aesthetics of illness; women and revolution; poetry clubs; the function of memory in women’s literature; problems of gender and genre.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese. Formerly CHNS 201.

China

EALL 212, PHIL 203

Ancient Chinese Thought

Michael Hunter
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

An introduction to the foundational works of ancient Chinese thought from the ruling ideologies of the earliest historical dynasties, through the Warring States masters, to the Qin and Han empires. Topics include Confucianism and Daoism, the role of the intellectual in ancient Chinese society, and the nature and performance of wisdom.

China

EALL 213, HUMS 292, PHIL 205, RLST 211

Philosophy, Religion, and Literature in Medieval China

Lucas Bender
M 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Fall

Exploration of the rich intellectual landscape of the Chinese middle ages, introducing students to seminal works of Chinese civilization and to the history of their debate and interpretation in the first millennium. No previous knowledge of China is assumed. Instead, the course serves as a focused introduction to Chinese philosophy, religion, and literature.

Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 236, LITR 181

Japanese Poetry and Poetics

Edward Kamens
W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Core concepts and traditions of classical Japanese poetry explored through the medium of translation. Readings from anthologies and treatises of the ninth through early twentieth centuries. Attention to recent critical studies in transcultural poetic theory. Inspection and discussion of related artifacts in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library and the Yale University Art Gallery

Permission of instructor required. Readings and discussion in English. Previous study of literary texts is recommended but not required.

Japan

EALL 255

Japanese Modernism

Seth Jacobowitz
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Japanese literature and art from the 1920s through the 1940s. The avant-garde and mass culture; popular genre fiction; the advent of new media technologies and techniques; effects of Japanese imperialism, militarism, and fascism on cultural production; experimental writers and artists and their resistance to, or complicity with, the state.

Japan

EALL 256, EAST 358, GLBL 251, HUMS 272, LITR 265

China in the World

Jing Tsu
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Recent headlines about China in the world, deciphered in both modern and historical contexts. Interpretation of new events and diverse texts through transnational connections. Topics for 2016 include China and Africa, Mandarinization, labor and migration, Chinese America, nationalism and humiliation, and art and counterfeit. 

Readings and discussion in English.

China

EALL 265, LITR 251

Japanese Literature after 1970

Stephen Poland
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Spring

Study of Japanese literature published between 1970 and the present. Writers may include Murakami Ryu, Maruya Saiichi, Shimada Masahiko, Nakagami Kenji, Yoshimoto Banana, Yamada Eimi, Murakami Haruki, and Medoruma Shun.

Permission of instructor required. Enrollment limited to 20. No knowledge of Japanese required.

Japan

EALL 270, FILM 306

Anime and the Posthuman

Seth Jacobowitz
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Spring

Japanese anime and its conceptions of the posthuman condition made possible by advances in science and technology. The persistence of myth, archetype, and humanist philosophy.

Japan

EALL 289, LITR 255

Crime and Detective Fiction in East Asian Literature and Film

Stephen Poland
T, Th 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Fall

Exploration of East Asian literature, film, culture, and history through examination of the genre of “crime” or “detective” fiction. Topics include genre theory, as well as a variety of traveling themes in modernity, such as sexuality, surveillance, colonialism, scientific rationality, perversion, the urban, debt, violence, and transnational cultural flows.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 292

Japanese New Wave Cinema

Stephen Poland
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Study of the “New Wave” in Japanese cinema in the period between 1955-1975, with focus on how films sought to make social and political interventions both in content and film form. Consideration of what New Wave films and critical writing tell the world about Japan’s postwar, high-speed economic growth; student and counterculture movements; and the place of Japan in the Cold War order.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 299

Decolonizing East Asia

Stephen Poland
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Exploration of how literary and cinematic works engaged with, promoted, critiqued, and struggled with empire and colonization in East Asia from the late-nineteenth-century to the present day. Topics include Japan’s imperial rivalry with colonial and postcolonial Europe; post-WWII cultural works and the neoimperialism of Soviet-American Cold War order; empire and colonization after the Cold War, especially in terms of the rise of China; and continued relevance of past imperial formations in twenty-first-century cultural production.

Permission of instructor required

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 303

Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Study of successive appropriations and reorientation of Chinese poetic forms in the major genres, such as song lyric (ci) and vernacular lyric (qu) traditions, traced from early foundations to those written in later times. Topics include the creation of cultural values and identities, problems of authorship and authority, exile and poetic writing, reception, and material culture.

Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. After CHNS 171 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Formerly CHNS 303. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 308, HUMS 305, PHIL 410

Sages of the Ancient World

Michael Hunter
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Comparative survey of the embodiment and performance of wisdom by ancient sages. Distinctive features and common themes in discourses about wisdom from China, India, the Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Topics include teaching, scheming, and dying.

China, Transregional

EALL 317

The Plum in the Golden Vase

Tina Lu
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Close reading of the late-sixteenth-century erotic novel The Plum in the Golden Vase in translation. The novel as a window on sixteenth-century Chinese society. Discussion of sexuality, commerce, and material culture. No knowledge of Chinese required.

Permission of instructor required. Formerly CHNS 217.

China

EALL 325

Chinese Poetic Form, 1490-1990

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Development of the classical Chinese poetic form by modern Chinese poets. The appeal and aesthetic concept of the classical form since the revivalist movement of the late fifteenth century. Emphasis on close critical reading, with attention to cultural and political contexts.

Permission of instructor required. Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. Prerequisite: a literary Chinese course or permission of instructor.

China

EALL 357

Meiji Literature and Visual Culture

Seth Jacobowitz
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Introduction to the literature and visual culture of Meiji Japan (1868–1912), including novels, poetry, calligraphy, woodblock prints, painting, photography, and cinema. The relationship between theories and practices of fine art and literature; changes in word and image relations; transformations from woodblock to movable-type print culture; the invention of photography and early forms of cinematic practice.

No knowledge of Japanese required. Permission of instructor required

Japan

EALL 510

Man and Nature in Chinese Literature

Kang-I Chang
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

An exploration of man and nature in traditional Chinese literature, with special attention to aesthetic and cultural meanings. Topics include the concept of nature and literature; Neo-Daoist self-cultivation; poetry and Zen (Chan) Buddhism; travel in literature; loss, lament, and self-reflection in song lyrics; nature and the supernatural in classical tales; love and allusions to nature; religious pilgrimage and allegory.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese.

China

EALL 511

Women and Literature in Traditional China

Kang-I Chang
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

This course focuses on major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. Topics include the power of women’s writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; the cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; foot binding and its implications; women’s notion of love and death; the aesthetic of illness; women and revolution; women’s poetry clubs; the function of memory in women’s literature; problems of gender and genre.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese.

China

EALL 512

Ancient Chinese Thought

Michael Hunter
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

An introduction to the foundational works of ancient Chinese thought from the ruling ideologies of the earliest historical dynasties, through the Warring States masters, to the Qin and Han empires. Topics include Confucianism and Daoism, the role of the intellectual in ancient Chinese society, and the nature and performance of wisdom. 

This is primarily an undergraduate course; graduate students are provided readings in the original language and meet in an additional session to review translations.

China

EALL 513

Philosophy, Religion, and Literature in Medieval China

Lucas Bender
M 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Fall

This course explores the rich intellectual landscape of the Chinese middle ages, introducing students to seminal works of Chinese civilization and to the history of their debate and interpretation in the first millennium. No previous knowledge of China is assumed. 

This is primarily an undergraduate course; graduate students are provided readings in the original language and meet in an additional session to review translations.

China

EALL 536

Japanese Poetry and Poetics

Edward Kamens
W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Core concepts and traditions of classical Japanese poetry explored through the medium of translation. Readings from anthologies and treatises of the ninth through early twentieth century. Attention to recent critical studies in transcultural poetic theory. Inspection and discussion of related artifacts in the Beinecke Library and the Yale Art Gallery. 

No knowledge of Japanese required.

Japan

EALL 555

Japanese Modernism

Seth Jacobowitz
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Japanese literature and art from the 1920s through the 1940s. The avant-garde and mass culture; popular genre fiction; the advent of new media technologies and tech­niques; effects of Japanese imperialism, militarism, and fascism on cultural production; experimental writers and artists and their resistance to, or complicity with, the state.

Japan

EALL 565

Japanese Literature after 1970

Stephen Poland
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Study of Japanese literature published between 1970 and the present. Writers may include Murakami Ryu, Maruya Saiichi, Shimada Masahiko, Nakagami Kenji, Yoshimoto Banana, Yamada Eimi, Murakami Haruki, and Medoruma Shun.

No knowledge of Japanese required.

Japan

EALL 599

Decolonizing East Asia

Stephen Poland
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

This course explores how literary and cinematic works engaged with, promoted, critiqued, and struggled with empire and colonization in East Asia from the late-nineteenth century to the present. We explore how the very ideas of “literature” and “cinema” in East Asia were entangled with the rise of the Japanese empire in the context of imperial rivalry with Europe, and how these categories were contested and transformed by writers and filmmakers in colonial and postcolonial contexts. The course also examines how discourses of empire and colonization continued to be relevant in post-WWII cultural works grappling with the neoimperialism of Soviet-American Cold War order. Finally, we consider questions of empire and colonization after the Cold War, especially in terms of the rise of China and continued relevance of past imperial formations in twenty-first-century cultural production. 

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 603

Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Study of successive appropriations and reorientation of Chinese poetic forms in the major genres, such as song lyric (ci) and vernacular lyric (qu) traditions, traced from early foundations to those written in later times. Topics include the creation of cultural values and identities, problems of authorship and authority, exile and poetic writing, reception, and material culture.

Readings in Chinese; discussion in English.

China

EALL 608

Sages of the Ancient World

Michael Hunter
T, Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Comparative survey of the embodiment and performance of wisdom by ancient sages. Distinctive features and common themes in discourses about wisdom from China, India, the Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Topics include teaching, scheming, and dying.

China, Transregional

EALL 617

The Plum in the Golden Vase

Tina Lu
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Close reading of the late-sixteenth-century erotic novel The Plum in the Golden Vase in translation. The novel as a window on sixteenth-century Chinese society. Discussion of sexuality, commerce, and material culture.

No knowledge of Chinese required.

China

EALL 625

Chinese Poetic Form, 1490-1990

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

What is the appeal and the aesthetic concept of the Classical Chinese poetic form, which began in classical antiquity and continued to serve as a primary medium for poetic expression in modern times? How did modern writers express their “new” voices by using this “old” form? The seminar traces the “modern” development of Chinese classical poetry from the Revivalist (fugu) movement of the Ming to contemporary China in Shanghai. Emphasis on critical close reading, with attention to cultural and political contexts. Baihua translations and notes are provided for most of the poems.

Primary readings in Chinese, discussion in English.

China

EALL 657

Meiji Literature and Visual Culture

Seth Jacobowitz
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Introduction to the literature and visual culture of Meiji Japan (1868–1912), including novels, poetry, calligraphy, woodblock prints, painting, photography, and cinema. The relationship between theories and practices of fine art and literature; changes in word and image relations; transformations from woodblock to movable-type print culture; the invention of photography and early forms of cinematic practice.

Japan

EALL 715

Readings in Modern Japanese Literature

Seth Jacobowitz
T 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Fall

Readings from a selection of representative texts from modern to contemporary Japanese literature with a focus on comprehension, translation, critical reception, and close reading. Students have the opportunity to select a few texts of interest in consultation with the instructor.

Japan

EALL 720

Studies in Premodern Japanese Literature

Edward Kamens
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

A research seminar. Students pursue individual topics in pre-seventeenth-century literature and share readings and analyses for discussion on a rotating basis.

Prerequisite: proficiency in reading literary Japanese.

Japan

EALL 740

Topics in Early Chinese Literature

Michael Hunter
F 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Spring

An examination of key texts and problems in the study of early Chinese literature. Pri­mary sources vary from year to year but could include the Shijing, Chuci, Shiji, early sources of anecdotal literature, and the fu.

Discussions and papers are in English. This course may be repeated for credit.

China

EALL 823, CPLT 953

Topics in Sinophone and Chinese Studies

Jing Tsu
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

This seminar examines the current state of the field of Chinese and Sinophone studies from different geographical and theoretical perspectives. It is a research seminar and colloquium, and we use texts in the original as well as translated languages. Topics vary.

China

EALL 850

Theory in/and East Asia

Stephen Poland
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

This seminar engages with the question of what “Theory” might mean in the context of East Asian cultural studies. Many critiques have been made of the way “traveling theory” serves as a Euro-American universal applied to the “raw material” of East Asian texts, or as a transdisciplinary common language in the humanities and social sciences. We take this notion as a starting point to explore the intersections and interactions of “Theory” and “East Asia.” Questions include: What is Theory? Who gets to theorize? How have thinkers in East Asia engaged with Theory? How has Theory engaged with East Asia? What have been the major issues and debates in Theory, and how can they apply to scholarship on East Asian cultural production? How can the work of thinkers in/of East Asia offer critiques of Theory, and what problems arise from such challenges? These questions will also be situated in the historical context of disciplinary formation and the creation of Area Studies in universities in the United States. 

Readings are primarily in English, but may also include Japanese, Chinese, or Korean depending on student interest and language abilities.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 892, FILM 874

Japanese New Wave Cinema

Stephen Poland
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

This course explores the “New Wave” in Japanese cinema in the context of the rise of “new wave” across cinemas in the American sphere in the period roughly between 1955 and 1975. It focuses on both local contexts and global flows in the turn to experimental filmmaking in Japan, paying particular attention to how films sought to make social and political interventions in both content and form. We analyze New Wave films and critical writing by asking what they can tell us about Japan’s postwar, high-speed economic growth, student and counterculture movements, and place in the Cold War order. We also consider what the Japanese New Wave tells us about the possibilities of cinema: its global simultaneity, transcultural movement, and historical trajectory. Topics include the legacy of World War II in Japan and cinema as a mode for narrating history; the rise of global youth culture in the context of postwar economic growth; cinema and protest against the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty; the aesthetic use of sex, violence, and politics to shock mainstream culture; documentary as a site for radical experimentation; the studio system, independent filmmaking, and transformations of the Japanese film industry; and what is meant by “modernist” and “avant-garde” in New Wave cinema.

Japan

EAST 401, SOCY 305

State and Society Relations in Post-Socialist China

Abigail Coplin
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Focus on the interplay of state, market, and society in contemporary China. How institutions of the market reform era have redistributed material assets, political power, and social capital among different groups of social actors and how to use contemporary China as a case with which to engage social and political theory.

Permission of instructor required

China

EAST 402, HIST 303J

Everyday Life in Modern Korea, 1800 to the Present

Holly Stephens
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

The history of modern Korea, from 1800 to the present. Tracing major events that reshaped Korean society, including reform and rebellion in the nineteenth century, empire and colonialism, war, industrialization, democratization, and the political tensions surrounding North and South Korea. Consideration of the everyday lives of Koreans who lived through “the headlines” and how we have come to understand Korean history in the present.

Permission of instructor required.

Korea

EAST 403, ANTH 411

Biological, Archaeological, and Historical Perspectives of Early East Asia

Leland Rogers
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Exploration of prehistoric and early-historical interactions of the peoples of northeast Asia from 3000 B.C.E. through the Han Dynasty period, including foundational influences involved in the construction of the modern concept of “East Asia.” Focus on early demographic and genetic data as revealed by ancient DNA and population genetics analyses; introduction to analytical and methodological approaches to DNA analysis in relation to the material culture and textual records. No prior experience with genetics or biological anthropology required.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional, Mongolia

EAST 404, EALL 288, ER&M 404

The History and Literature of the Ainu

Dominik Wallner
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

An exploration of the history, culture, and literature of the Ainu people in northern Japan, from prehistory to the twenty-first century.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 491

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 492

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 900

Master’s Thesis

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 900

Master's Thesis

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 910

Independent Study

By arrangement with faculty and with approval of the DGS.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 910

Independent Study

By arrangement with faculty and with approval of the DGS.

China, Japan, Transregional

ECON 442

Microfoundations of Growth in China

Xiaoxue Zhao
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

A comprehensive overview of the challenges China faces as it transitions from a centrally planned economy to adopting a greater reliance on market-based mechanisms. Review of microeconomic literature on China’s recent economic and institutional transformation to provide a general analytical framework for understanding the economic implications of the process. 

Prerequisites: intermediate microeconomics and econometrics. Permission of instructor required.

China

ER&M 327, EAST 327, SOCY 278

Race and Ethnicity in East Asia and Beyond

Kazuko Suzuki
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Exploration of how racial, ethnic, and national identities—the sense of being Japanese, Korean, and Chinese—change in different social, political, and historical contexts. Consideration of how majorities and minorities are made and marked across cultural, regional, and national boundaries by examining issues surrounding major minority groups in East Asia and East Asians outside their home countries.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

GLBL 312, EAST 454, ECON 474

Economic and Policy Lessons from Japan

Stephen Roach
HTBA
Spring

An evaluation of Japan’s protracted economic problems and of their potential implications for other economies, including the United States, Europe, and China. Currency pressures, policy blunders, Abenomics, bubbles, and the global economic crisis of 2008; dangers to the global economy from a protracted postcrisis recovery period. Focus on policy remedies to avert similar problems in other countries.

Prerequisite: a course in macroeconomics. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

GLBL 318, EAST 338, ECON 338

The Next China

Stephen Roach
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Economic development in China since the late 1970s. Emphasis on factors pushing China toward a transition from its modern export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. The possibility of a resulting identity crisis, underscored by China’s need to embrace political reform and by the West’s long-standing misperceptions of China.

Prerequisite: introductory macroeconomics.

China

GLBL 618, MGT 911

The Next China

Stephen Roach
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Born out of necessity in the post-Cultural Revolution chaos of the late 1970s, modern China is about reforms, opening up, and transition. The Next China will be driven by the transition from an export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. China’s new model could unmask a dual identity crisis—underscored by China’s need to embrace political reform and the West’s long-standing misperceptions about China. 

Prerequisite: basic undergraduate macroeconomics.

China

HIST 030, EAST 030

Tokyo

Fabian Drixler
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Four centuries of Japan’s history explored through the many incarnations, destructions, and rebirths of its foremost city. Focus on the solutions found by Tokyo’s residents to the material and social challenges of concentrating such a large population in one place. Tensions between continuity and impermanence, authenticity and modernity, and social order and the culture of play.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

HIST 032, EAST 032

Shanghai

Denise Ho
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

History of the city of Shanghai, with a focus on how Shanghai has been seen and what its experience reveals about modern China. Shanghai’s unique place in imagining China; its transformation in the nineteenth century from a fishing village to an international “treaty port” and China’s gateway to the West; twentieth-century Shanghai as a site of innovation, from politics and capitalism to media and fashion; the city’s vilification in the early Mao years and later reemergence as a symbol of China’s modernization.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required. Permission of instructor required.

China

HIST 101

The World Circa 1000

Valerie Hansen, Anders Winroth
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A study of the world’s major societies and the encounters among them circa 1000, when globalization began. Attention to China, India, Europe, the Vikings, Africa, the Islamic world, Amerindians including the Maya. Analysis of written and archaeological sources.

China, Transregional, South Asia

HIST 307, EAST 301

The Making of Japan's Great Peace, 1550-1850

Fabian Drixler
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Examination of how, after centuries of war in Japan and overseas, the Tokugawa shogunate built a peace that lasted more than 200 years. Japan’s urban revolution, the eradication of Christianity, the Japanese discovery of Europe, and the question whether Tokugawa Japan is a rare example of a complex and populous society that achieved ecological sustainability.

Japan

HIST 309J, EAST 309

Uses of the Past in Modern China

Denise Ho
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Modern China’s use of the past in state-sponsored narratives of nation, in attempts to construct heritage by elites and intellectuals, and in grassroots projects of remembrance. Theories on history and memory; primary sources in English translation; case studies from twentieth-century China. Interdisciplinary readings in art history, anthropology, cultural studies, and history.

Permission of instructor required.

China

HIST 319, MMES 314, NELC 317

Islam in Asia

Valerie Hansen, Michael Rapoport
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Examination of the three countries with the largest Muslim populations (Indonesia, India, and Pakistan) and China. Case studies on how the history of Islam in these countries helps us to understand present-day controversies regarding violence (jihad), gender, law (Shariʿa), and governance (caliphate). Exploration of similarity and diversity in beliefs and practices.

China, Transregional

HIST 321

China from Present to Past, 2015-600

Peter C. Perdue
T, Th 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Spring

Underlying causes of current issues facing China traced back to their origins in the premodern period. Topics include economic development, corruption, environmental crises, gender, and Pacific island disputes. Selected primary-source readings in English, images, videos, and Web resources.

China

HIST 375, EAST 375

China from Mao to Now

Denise Ho
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

The history of the People’s Republic of China from Mao to now, with a focus on understanding the recent Chinese past and framing contemporary events in China in historical context. How the party-state is organized; interactions between state and society; causes and consequences of economic disparities; ways in which various groups—from intellectuals to religious believers—have shaped the meaning of contemporary Chinese society.

China

HIST 868

Documents in Tang, Song, and Yuan Dynasties

Valerie Hansen
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A survey of the historical genres of premodern China: the dynastic histories, other chronicles, gazetteers, literati notes, and Buddhist and Daoist canons. How to determine what different information these sources contain for research topics in different fields.

Prerequisite: at least one term of classical Chinese.

China

HIST 869

Issues in Tang, Song, and Yuan Dynasties

Valerie Hansen
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

An introduction to the debates about Chinese history between 600 and 1400 including economics, gender, printing, religion, and social change.

China

HIST 874

Research Seminar in Modern Chinese History

Peter C. Perdue
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

This course focuses on developing skills needed for academic writing in East Asian studies, including preparation of thesis prospectuses, research papers, and grant proposals. We begin with discussions of recent trends in the East Asian modern history and literature fields, and of academic writing styles. Students then draft projects for presentation to the class.

Prerequisite: knowledge of modern Chinese or Japanese; open to undergraduate majors in East Asian Studies with permission of the instructor.

China

HIST 877

Readings in Modern Chinese History

Peter C. Perdue
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

In this course we read and discuss recent English-language monographs on modern Chinese history. The primary focus is topics that span the Qing to twentieth century and contain international, transnational, and comparative implications.

No knowledge of Chinese required; open to undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

China

HIST 878

Readings in Japanese History to 1850

Fabian Drixler
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

A critical introduction to debates in the history of Japan up to about 1850, with particular emphasis on the Tokugawa and Meiji periods but some coverage of earlier times as well. 

Readings are in English but, depending on student interest, supplemental materials may also be assigned in Japanese.

Japan

HIST 880

Japanese Reference Works and Documents

Daniel Botsman
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Provides training in the use of reference works and an introduction to the specialist skills needed to undertake research in pre-20th century Japanese history. Emphasis will be on learning documents written in the so-called “epistolary style” (sōrōbun) and to exploring Yale’s rich collection of pre-modern source materials.

Japan

HIST 889

Research in Japanese History

Daniel Botsman
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

After a general introduction to the broad array of sources and reference materials available for conducting research related to the history of Japan since ca. 1600, students prepare original research papers on topics of their own choosing in a collaborative workshop environment.

Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Japanese.

Japan

HIST 893

History of China’s Republican Period

Denise Ho
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This reading seminar examines recent English-language scholarship on China’s Republi­can period (1912–1949) covering themes from state and economy to society and culture. Weekly topics include state institutions and law, nationalism, politics and political move­ments, the development of cities, media and publication, public health, education, labor, and rural reconstruction.

China

HSAR 143, RLST 188, SAST 260

Introduction to the History of Art: Buddhist Art and Architecture, 900 to 1600

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
T, Th 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Spring

Buddhist art and architecture of East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Tibet from the tenth century to the early modern period. Emphasis on cross-regional engagements including the impact of Islam.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Tibet

HSAR 453

Textiles of Asia, 800–1800 C.E.

Ruth Barnes
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Survey of the great textile traditions of China, India, and the Islamic world from the ninth through eighteenth centuries C.E. The roles of central and southeast Asia in the transmission of styles and techniques. The cultural meaning, mobility, and cross-cultural significance of textiles in Asia. Extensive use of the Yale University Art Gallery’s textile collections.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional, South Asia

HSAR 475

Chinese Painting in the Seventeenth Century

David Sensabaugh
Th 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Spring

Chinese painting from the masters of the late Ming period to the individualist and orthodox masters of the early Qing dynasty. Issues of art based on either art or nature. Attention to paintings from the period in the Yale University Art Gallery collection.

Permission of instructor required.

China

HSAR 794

Chinese Painting under the Mongols, 1260-1368

David Sensabaugh
Th 10:30 AM - 12:20 PM
Fall

The period corresponding to Mongol rule in China has been interpreted as a major turning point in the history of Chinese painting. Painters are seen as having turned from an objective tradition to a subjective one. It has been described as a revolution in painting. In this seminar we explore this understanding of Yuan dynasty painting through an examination of major painters and attributions, raising issues of what constitutes Yuan painting. Was the Yuan period truly a major turning point in the history of painting in China?

China

HSAR 811

Cartographic Japan in the Age of Exploration

Mimi Yiengpruksawan, Seth Jacobowitz
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

It has been well noted that maps and more broadly the cartographic sciences constitute the very core of a voracious desire to know and consume the world that is intimately tied to the European expansion of the 1500s. The existence of Theatrum orbis terrarum and Civitates orbis terrarum virtually insure that the story is typically told from the European perspective. In this seminar we take up the East Asian perspective with emphasis on the ways in which cultural entanglement “east to west” brought about cultural productions in China, Korea, and Japan whose analysis yields insights into the interplay of local and translocal at the heart of the early modern world system.

Japan

HSAR 827

Lacquer in a World Context

Denise Leidy, Edward Cooke
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Taking advantage of the Art Gallery’s recent acquisition of a ca. 1600 lacquered namban writing cabinet and the accessibility of collections from the Art Gallery and the Peabody Museum on West Campus, this seminar offers students a global perspective on lacquer. The use of plant-based materials to provide a durable and decorative surface on wood has a long history, but different cultures drew on different types of materials and different techniques of application, and as a result developed their own aesthetic. This course draws on firsthand examination of and readings on East Asian, South Asian, Anglo-Dutch-American, and New Spain examples to understand the way in which the language of lacquer was shared throughout the world during the age of expansion from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century. 

Japan, Transregional, South Asia

JAPN 110

Elementary Japanese I

Koichi Hiroe, Yoshiko Maruyama, Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura, Aoi Saito, Masahiko Seto
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Introductory language course for students with no previous background in Japanese. Development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, including 50 hiragana, 50 katakana, and 75 kanji characters. Introduction to cultural aspects such as levels of politeness and group concepts. In-class drills in pronunciation and conversation. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

Credit only on completion of JAPN 120. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 120

Elementary Japanese II

Koichi Hiroe, Yoshiko Maruyama, Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura, Aoi Saito, Masahiko Seto
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 110, with supplementary materials such as excerpts from television shows, anime, and songs. Introduction of 150 additional kanji.

After JAPN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 130

Intermediate Japanese I

Yoshiko Maruyama, Mari Stever
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Continued development in both written and spoken Japanese. Aspects of Japanese culture, such as history, art, religion, and cuisine, explored through text, film, and animation. Online audio and visual aids facilitate listening, as well as the learning of grammar and kanji. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 140

Intermediate Japanese II

Yoshiko Maruyama, Mari Stever
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 130.

After JAPN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 150

Advanced Japanese I

Aoi Saito, Mari Stever
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Advanced language course that further develops proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Reading and discussion materials include works by Nobel Prize winners. Japanese anime and television dramas are used to enhance listening and to develop skills in culturally appropriate speech. Writing of essays, letters, and criticism solidifies grammar and style. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 140 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 151

Advanced Japanese II

Aoi Saito, Mari Stever
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 150.

After JAPN 150 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 156

Advanced Japanese III

Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Close reading of modern Japanese writing on current affairs, social science, history, and literature. Development of speaking and writing skills in academic settings, including formal speeches, interviews, discussions, letters, e-mail, and expository writing. Interviews of and discussions with native speakers on current issues. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 157

Advanced Japanese IV

Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 156.

After JAPN 156 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 162

Reading Academic Japanese I

Masahiko Seto
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Close reading of major writings from the Meiji era to the present, including newspaper articles, scholarly works, fiction, and prose. Students gain a command of academic Japanese through comprehensive study of grammar in the context of culture. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 157 or equivalent; recommended to be taken after or concurrently with JAPN 170.

Japan

JAPN 163

Reading Academic Japanese II

Masahiko Seto
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 162.

After JAPN 162 or equivalent; recommended to be taken after JAPN 170.

Japan

JAPN 164

Academic and Professional Spoken Japanese

Koichi Hiroe
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on the speaking skills necessary in academic and professional settings. Includes online interviews, discussions, and debates with native Japanese students and scholars on contemporary topics such as globalization, environment, technology, human rights, and cultural studies. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 163 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 165

Academic and Professional Spoken Japanese

Koichi Hiroe
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on the speaking skills necessary in academic and professional settings. Includes online interviews, discussions, and debates with native Japanese students and scholars on contemporary topics such as globalization, environment, technology, human rights, and cultural studies. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 163 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 170

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Edward Kamens
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 171

Readings in Literary Japanese

Jeffrey Niedermaier
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Close analytical reading of a selection of texts from the Nara through the Tokugawa periods: prose, poetry, and various genres. Introduction to kanbun.

After JAPN 170 or equivalent. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

JAPN 570

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Edward Kamens
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 571

Readings in Literary Japanese

Jeffrey Niedermaier
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Close analytical reading of a selection of texts from the Nara through Tokugawa period: prose, poetry, and various genres. Introduction of kanbun.

After JAPN 570 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 736

Poetry and Poetics

Edward Kamens
M 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Fall

Readings in classical poetry, treatises, and commentaries; offered in conjunction with EALL 536 for students with proficiency in literary Japanese.

Japan

KREN 110

Elementary Korean I

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

A beginning course in modern Korean. Pronunciation, lectures on grammar, conversation practice, and introduction to the writing system (Hankul).

Credit only on completion of KREN 120. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 120

Elementary Korean II

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 110.

After KREN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 130

Intermediate Korean I

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Continued development of skills in modern Korean, spoken and written, leading to intermediate-level proficiency.

After KREN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 132

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners I

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Intended for students with some oral proficiency but little or no training in Hankul. Focus on grammatical analysis, the standard spoken language, and intensive training in reading and writing.

This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 140

Intermediate Korean II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 130.

After KREN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 142

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 132.

After KREN 132 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 152

Advanced Korean for Advanced Learners

Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An advanced course in modern Korean. Reading of short stories, essays, and journal articles, and introduction of 200 Chinese characters. Students develop their speaking and writing skills through discussions and written exercises.

After KREN 142 or 151, or with permission of instructor.

Korea

KREN 154

Advanced Korean III

Seungja Choi
W 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Spring

An advanced language course designed to develop reading and writing skills using Web-based texts in a variety of genres. Students read texts independently and complete comprehension and vocabulary exercises through the Web. Discussions, tests, and intensive writing training in class.

After KREN 151 or equivalent.

Korea

LAW 21361

Chinese Law and Policy

Taisu Zhang
W 10:10 AM - 12:00 PM
Spring

This course will survey law and legal practice in the People’s Republic of China. Particular attention is given to the interaction of legal institutions with politics, social change, and economic development. Specific topics include, among others, the Party State, state capitalism, the judiciary, property law and development, business and investment law, criminal law and procedure, media (especially the Internet), and major schools of Chinese legal and political thought. Prior familiarity with Chinese history or politics is unnecessary but helpful.

All course materials will be in English. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. Permission of the instructor required.

China

PLSC 357, EAST 310, GLBL 309

The Rise of China

Daniel Mattingly
M,W 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Fall

Analysis of contemporary Chinese politics, with focus on how the country has become a major power and how the regime has endured. Topics include China’s recent history, state, ruling party, economy, censorship, elite politics, and foreign policy.

China

PLSC 405, EAST 406

Microfoundations of Japanese Politics

Seiki Tanaka
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Examination of Japanese politics from a comparative perspective; how Japanese politics and society work and how Japan resembles and differs from other democracies. Topics include elections, gender discrimination, immigration, disaster relief, economic policy, foreign policies, structural changes such as population aging, and the rise of China. Students develop skills for evaluating and constructing causal arguments about politics across time and space and learn how to study empirical implications of causal arguments.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

REL 616

Introduction to East Asian Theology

Chloe Starr
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This course introduces students to some of the themes and key thinkers in twentieth century theology in Japan, Taiwan and Korea. It surveys different theological movements within these countries (such as ‘homeland theology,’ Minjung theology etc.) and encourages the development of a critical response to the challenges that these theologies raise for both non-Asians and Asians. The course considers contextualization and inculturation debates in each of these societies, as well as regional responses to Christianity. We read primary texts in English, with background reading for context, and students will be encouraged to develop their own responses to the authors and their thought.

Japan, Korea, Transregional, Taiwan

RLST 127, SAST 467

Visual Worlds of Himalayan Buddhism

Andrew Quintman
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The role of images and imagining in the religious traditions of Tibetan Buddhism. How Tibetan Buddhist cultures produce religious images; ways of visualizing those images to invest them with meaning. Topics include specific modes of visual representation, relationships between text and image, social lives of images, and processes of reading and interpretation.

Permission of instructor required

China, Transregional, South Asia, Tibet

RLST 182, SAST 459

Buddhist Traditions of Mind and Meditation

Andrew Quintman
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Buddhist meditation practices examined in the context of traditional theories of mind, perception, and cognition. Readings both from Buddhist canonical works and from secondary scholarship on cognitive science and ritual practice.

Recommended preparation: a course in Asian religions. Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional, South Asia

RLST 542

Early Chan/Zen Buddhism

Eric Greene
W 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Fall

Exploration of the literature of early Chan/Zen Buddhism (seventh–eighth century). Selected readings in genres such as hagiographies, lineage texts, ritual manuals, and doctrinal treatises. Introduction of tools and methods for studying Buddhist texts in Chinese.

China

RLST 546

Tibetan Historical Texts

Andrew Quintman
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This seminar focuses on a variety of Tibetan sources on Buddhist religious history.

Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Classical Tibetan. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

China, Transregional, South Asia

RLST 547

Classical Tibetan Literature

Andrew Quintman
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This seminar focuses on a variety of Tibetan sources on Buddhist religious history.

China, Transregional, South Asia

RLST 565, SAST 559

Buddhist Traditions of Mind and Meditation

Andrew Quintman
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Buddhist meditation practices examined in the context of traditional theories of mind, perception, and cognition. Readings both from Buddhist canonical works and from secondary scholarship on cognitive science and ritual practice.

Recommended preparation: a course in Asian religions.

China, Transregional, South Asia, Tibet

RLST 583, SAST 567

Visual Worlds of Himalayan Buddhism

Andrew Quintman
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The role of images and imagining in the religious traditions of Tibetan Buddhism. How Tibetan Buddhist cultures produce religious images; ways of visualizing those images to invest them with meaning. Topics include specific modes of visual representation, relationships between text and image, social lives of images, and processes of reading and interpretation.

China, Transregional, South Asia

SOCY 086

China in the Age of Xi Jinping

Deborah Davis
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

An overview of the major social institutions in contemporary China, with a focus on the changing relationship between individual and society. Use of print and visual sources to explore the social consequences of China’s recent retreat from socialism and its rapid integration into the global economy.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required. Permission of instructor required.

China

SOCY 395, EAST 408, EP&E 269

Wealth and Poverty in Modern China

Deborah Davis
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The underlying causes and consequences of the changing distribution of income, material assets, and political power in contemporary China. Substantive focus on inequality and stratification. Instruction in the use of online Chinese resources relevant to research. Optional weekly Chinese language discussions.

Prerequisite: a previous course on China since 1949. Permission of instructor required.

China

SOCY 596, EAST 596

Wealth and Poverty in Modern China

Deborah Davis
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The underlying causes and consequences of the changing distribution of income, material assets, and political power in contemporary China. Substantive focus on inequality and stratification. Instruction in the use of online Chinese resources relevant to research. 

Optional weekly Chinese language discussions. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

China