CEAS Course Page

This list is subject to modification.

Some of the information contained here may have changed since the time of publication. Always check with the department under which the course is listed or on the official Yale Online Course Information website to make sure that the courses you are interested in are still being offered and that the times have not changed. Course information is also available on the Yale Blue Book website.

If you have questions about any of the courses listed here, please contact the offering department directly.

ANTH 170

Chinese Culture, Society, and History

Helen Siu
M,W 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Anthropological explorations of basic institutions in traditional and contemporary Chinese society. Topics include kinship and marriage, religion and ritual, economy and social stratification, state culture, socialist revolution, and market reform.

China

ANTH 234 , WGSS 234

Disability and Culture

Karen Nakamura
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Exploration of disability from a cross-cultural perspective, using examples from around the globe. Disability as it relates to identity, culture, law, and politics. Case studies may include deafness in Japan, wheelchair mobility in the United States, and mental illness in the former Soviet republics.

Japan, Transregional

ANTH 254

Japan: Culture, Society, Modernity

Karen Nakamura
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Introduction to Japanese society and culture. The historical development of Japanese society; family, work, and education in contemporary Japan; Japanese aesthetics; and psychological, sociological, and cultural interpretations of Japanese behavior.

Japan

ANTH 317, EAST 363, HSAR 479, SAST 363

Himalayan Collections at Yale

Mark Turin
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Online tools and new digital media are used to explore links between four library and museum collections at Yale that are from and about the Himalayan region: Bubriski’s black-and-white photographs of Nepal; Buddhist scrolls and fabric temple banners; Christian missionary archives; documents on the political history of Nepal. Collective cataloging of materials in the collections.

Permission required

China, Transregional, South Asia, Tibet

ANTH 339

Urban Ethnography of Asia

Erik Harms
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Introduction to the anthropological study of contemporary Asian cities. Focus on new ethnographies about cities in East, Southeast, and South Asia. Topics include rural-urban migration, redevelopment, evictions, social movements, land grabbing, master-planned developments, heritage preservation, utopian aspirations, social housing, slums and precariousness, and spatial cleansing.

Permission Required

China, Japan, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia

ANTH 349, EAST 359

Humanitarianism across Asia

Chika Watanabe
W 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Spring

Introduction to international humanitarianism, with a focus on aid across Asia and by Asian actors. Theories of humanitarian moralities, charity, paradoxes, and politics. Ways in which analyses of inter-Asian connections can be developed through the study of humanitarian problems, ideologies, and actions.

Permission required

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

ANTH 353, SAST 369

Himalayan Languages & Culture

Mark Turin
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Exploration of social, linguistic, and political aspects of the Himalayan region. Issues include classifications of communities and their languages; census-taking and other state enumeration projects; the crisis of endangered oral cultures and speech forms; the creation and adoption of writing systems and the challenges of developing mother tongue literacy materials. Case studies are drawn from Bhutan, northern India, Nepal, and Tibet.

Permission required

China, Transregional, South Asia, Tibet

ANTH 553, SAST 569

Himalayan Languages & Culture

Mark Turin
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Exploration of social, linguistic, and political aspects of the Himalayan region. Issues include classifications of communities and their languages; census-taking and other state enumeration projects; the crisis of endangered oral cultures and speech forms; the creation and adoption of writing systems and the challenges of developing mother tongue literacy materials. Case studies are drawn from Bhutan, northern India, Nepal, and Tibet.

China, Transregional, South Asia, Tibet

ANTH 759, ARCG 759

Social Complexity in Ancient China

Anne Underhill
F 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

This seminar explores the variety of archaeological methods and theoretical approaches that have been employed to investigate the development and nature of social complexity in ancient China. The session meetings focus on the later prehistoric and early historic periods, and several geographic regions are included. They also consider how developments in ancient China compare to other areas of the world. Most of the readings emphasize archaeological remains, although relevant information from early historical texts is considered.

China

ANTH 941

Research Seminar in Japan Anthropology

The seminar offers professional preparation for doctoral students in Japan anthropology through systematic readings and analysis of the anthropological literature, in English and in Japanese.

Permission of the instructor required.

Japan

ANTH 941

Research Seminar in Japan Anthropology

The seminar offers professional preparation for doctoral students in Japan anthropology through systematic readings and analysis of the anthropological literature, in English and in Japanese.

Permission of the instructor required.

Japan

ARCH 3240

Spatial Concepts of Japan

Yoko Kawai
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The seminar explores the origins and developments of Japanese spatial concepts and surveys how they help form the contemporary architecture, ways of life, and cities of the country. Many Japanese spatial concepts, such as MA, are about creating time-space distances and relationship between objects, people, space, and experiences. These concepts go beyond the fabric of a built structure, and encompass architecture, landscape, and city. Each class is designed around one or two Japanese words that signify particular design concepts. Each week, a lecture on the word(s) with its design features, backgrounds, historical examples, and contemporary application is followed by student discussion. Contemporary works studied include those by Maki, Isozaki, Ando, Ito, Kuma, and SANAA. The urbanism and landscape of Tokyo and Kyoto are discussed. Students are required to make in-class presentations and write a final paper. Limited enrollment.

Japan

ARCH 341, LAST 318

Globalization Space

Keller Easterling
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Infrastructure space as a primary medium of change in global polity. Networks of trade, energy, communication, transportation, spatial products, finance, management, and labor, as well as new strains of political opportunity that reside within their spatial disposition. Case studies include free zones and automated ports around the world, satellite urbanism in South Asia, high-speed rail in Japan and the Middle East, agripoles in southern Spain, fiber optic submarine cable in East Africa, spatial products of tourism in North Korea, and management platforms of the International Organization for Standardization.

Permission required.

Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

ARCH 4216, F&ES 782

Globalization Space

Keller Easterling
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

This lecture course researches global infrastructures as a medium of transnational polity. Lectures visit the networks of trade, communication, tourism, labor, air, rail, highway, oil, hydrology, finance, and activism. Case studies travel around the world to, for instance, free trade zones in Dubai, IT campuses in South Asia, high-speed rail in Saudi Arabia, cable/satellite networks in Africa, highways in India, a resort in the DPRK, golf courses in China, oil-financed development in Sudan, and automated ports. These investigations begin in transnational territory where new infrastructure consortia operate in parallel to or in partnership with nations. Not only an atlas or survey of physical networks and shared protocols, the course also considers their pervasive and long-term effects on polity and culture. Infrastructures may constitute a de facto parliament of global decision making or an intensely spatial extra statecraft. Each week, readings, with both evidence and discursive commentary, accompany two lectures and a discussion section. A short midterm paper establishes each student’s research question for the term. A longer final paper completes the requirements of the course. Limited enrollment.

Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

CHNS 110

Elementary Modern Chinese I

Min Chen, Rongzhen Li, Jianhua Shen, Yu-Lin Saussy
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Intended for students with no background in Chinese. An intensive course with emphasis on spoken language and drills. Pronunciation, grammatical analysis, conversation practice, and introduction to reading and writing Chinese characters.

Credit only on completion of CHNS 120b. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 120

Elementary Modern Chinese II

Min Chen, Rongzhen Li, Jianhua Shen, Yu-Lin Saussy
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 110a.

Prerequisite: CHNS 110a or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 130

Intermediate Modern Chinese I

Ninghui Liang, Ling Mu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An intermediate course that continues intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and consolidates achievements from the first year of study. Students improve oral fluency, study more complex grammatical structures, and enlarge both reading and writing vocabulary.

Prerequisite: CHNS 120b or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 132

Elementary Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners I

Fan Liu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

First level of the advanced learner sequence, intended for students with some aural proficiency but limited ability in reading and writing Chinese. Training in listening and speaking, with emphasis on reading and writing. Placement confirmed by placement test and by instructor.

This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 140

Intermediate Modern Chinese II

Ninghui Liang, Ling Mu, Chuanmei Sun
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 130a.

Prerequisite: CHNS 130a or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 142

Elementary Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners II

Fan Liu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 132a.

Prerequisite: CHNS 132a or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 150

Advanced Modern Chinese I

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Haiwen Wang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Third level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Use of audiovisual materials, oral presentations, skits, and longer and more frequent writing assignments to assimilate more sophisticated grammatical structures. Further introduction to a wide variety of written forms and styles. Use of both traditional and simplified forms of Chinese characters.

Prerequisite: CHNS 140b or equivalent.

China

CHNS 151

Advanced Modern Chinese II

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Haiwen Wang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 PM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 150a.

Prerequisite: CHNS 150a or equivalent.

China

CHNS 152

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate to advanced oral proficiency and high elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them.

Prerequisite: CHNS 142b or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 153

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate to advanced oral proficiency and high elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them.

Prerequisite: CHNS 142b or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 154

Advanced Modern Chinese III

William Zhou
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Fourth level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Readings in a wide range of subjects form the basis of discussion and other activities. Students consolidate their skills, especially speaking proficiency, at an advanced level. Materials use both simplified and traditional characters.

Prerequisite: CHNS 151b or equivalent.

China

CHNS 155

Advanced Modern Chinese IV

William Zhou
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 154a.

Prerequisite: CHNS 154a or equivalent.

China

CHNS 156

Chinese through Film

Chuanmei Sun
M,W,F 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

A survey of Chinese films of the past twenty years, optimized for language teaching. Texts include plot summaries, critical essays, and some scripts. Discussions, screenings, presentations, and writing workshops consolidate the four language skills.

Prerequisite: CHNS 151b or equivalent.

China

CHNS 162

Advanced Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Wei Su
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Third level of the advanced learner sequence in Chinese. Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills (able to conduct conversations fluently) and with high intermediate reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000-1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

Prerequisite: CHNS 153b or equivalent.

China

CHNS 163

Advanced Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners

Wei Su
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Third level of the advanced learner sequence in Chinese. Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills (able to conduct conversations fluently) and with high intermediate reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000-1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

Prerequisite: CHNS 153b or equivalent.

China

CHNS 164

Readings in Contemporary Chinese Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Selected readings in Chinese fiction of the 1980s and 1990s. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

Prerequisite: CHNS 154a or equivalent.

China

CHNS 165

Readings in Modern Chinese Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Reading and discussion of modern short stories, most written prior to 1949. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

Prerequisite: CHNS 154a or equivalent.

China

CHNS 166

Chinese Media and Society

William Zhou
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on speaking and writing skills. Issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as newspapers, radio, television, and Internet blogs.

Prerequisite: CHNS 155b, CHNS 163b, or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 167

Chinese Media and Society

William Zhou
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on speaking and writing skills. Issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as newspapers, radio, television, and Internet blogs.

Prerequisite: CHNS 155, CHNS 163, or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 168

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Shucheng Zhang
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

Prerequisite: CHNS 155b, CHNS 163b, or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 169

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Shucheng Zhang
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

Prerequisite: CHNS 155b, CHNS 163b, or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 170

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Michael Hunter
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151b, CHNS 153b or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 171

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 170.

After CHNS 170a. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

CHNS 570

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Michael Hunter
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

China

CHNS 571

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 560a. Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 560a or equivalent.

China

EALL 200

The Chinese Tradition

Michael Hunter, Tina Lu
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

An introduction to the literature, culture, and thought of premodern China, from the beginnings of the written record to the turn of the twentieth century. Close study of textual and visual primary sources, with attention to their historical and cultural backdrops. No knowledge of Chinese required.

China

EALL 206, HUMS 431, LITR 175

Japan's Classics in Text and Image

Edward Kamens
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Fiction, poetry, and plays from the eighth century through the nineteenth, studied alongside related works of art and illustrated books housed in collections at Yale and in New York. An introduction to the Japanese classics as well as an example of interdisciplinary study in the humanities. No knowledge of Japanese required.

Formerly JAPN 200. Permission required.

Japan

EALL 210, LITR 172

Man and Nature in Chinese Literature

Kang-I Chang
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

An exploration of man and nature in traditional Chinese literature, with special attention to aesthetic and cultural meanings.  Topics include the concept of nature and literature; the Neo-Taoist self-cultivation; poetry and Zen (Chan) Buddhism;  travel in literature; loss, lament, and self-reflection in song lyrics; nature and the supernatural in classical tales;  love and allusions to nature; religious pilgrimage and allegory (as seen in the novel The Journey to the West). Readings in translation. No knowledge of Chinese required.

Formerly CHNS 200. Permission required.

China

EALL 216

Classical Tales from Tang to Qing

Tina Lu
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Close reading and translation of classical tales from the Tang, Ming, and Qing dynasties. Focus on strengthening students’ reading ability in classical Chinese. Attention to canonical Chinese narratives as well as some lesser-known texts. Discussion of themes such as romance, magical transformations, and proto-martial arts, including how these themes were transformed over time.

Prerequisite: CHNS 171 or equivalent. Formerly CHNS 180. Permission required.

China

EALL 222, THST 289

Kabuki Theater from Its Origins to the Present

William Fleming
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

The conventions, repertoire, and historical development of Kabuki theater since its origins in the early seventeenth century. The significance of the popular stage in early modern society; Kabuki’s influence on popular literature and adaptation into other media; the role of censorship and politics. No knowledge of Japanese required.

Formerly JAPN 290. Permission required.

Japan

EALL 241, HUMS 418, RLST 130, SAST 367

Traditional Literature of India, China, and Japan

Phyllis Granoff, Koichi Shinohara
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

Introduction to literary works that shaped the great civilizations of Asia. Focus on traditional literature from India, China, and Japan. Readings range from religious and philosophical texts to literature of the court, poetry, drama, and epics.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Transregional, South Asia

EALL 252, FILM 446, LITR 384

Japanese Cinema before 1960

Aaron Gerow
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM, Screenings T 7:00 PM - 9.30 PM
Fall

The history of Japanese cinema to 1960, including the social, cultural, and industrial backgrounds to its development. Periods covered include the silent era, the coming of sound and the wartime period, the occupation era, the golden age of the 1950s, and the new modernism of the late 1950s. No knowledge of Japanese required.

Formerly JAPN 270. Permission required.

Japan

EALL 254

The Atomic Bombings of Japan in World Culture

Aaron Gerow, Ran Zwigenberg
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Survey of literary, artistic, and intellectual responses to the nuclear destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Focus on works from Japan, with some attention to literary and visual arts worldwide. Genres include fiction, poetry, theater, and film.  No knowledge of Japanese required.

Permission required. Enrollment limited.

Japan

EALL 270

Anime and the Posthuman

Seth Jacobowitz
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM, Screenings M 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Spring

Japanese anime and its conceptions of the posthuman condition made possible by advances in science and technology. The persistence of myth, archetype, and humanist philosophy.

Japan

EALL 285, EAST 428, FILM 382

Home and Country in Chinese Cinema

Mia Liu
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM, Screenings W 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Fall

Visions and representations of home and nation in Chinese film from the 1930s to the present. The construction of utopian or monumental visions; representations of the destruction of an ideal, often manifested as sites of ruins or as memorials of loss, erasure, and eclipse. Relations between Chinese cinema and modern Chinese history. Readings in translation.

Permission required.

China

EALL 286, PORT 360

The Modern Novel in Brazil and Japan

Seth Jacobowitz
T 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Fall

Brazilian and Japanese novels from the late nineteenth century to the present. Representative texts from major authors are read in pairs to explore their commonalities and divergences. Topics include nineteenth-century realism and naturalism, the rise of mass culture and the avant-garde, and existentialism and postmodernism. No knowledge of Portuguese or Japanese required.

Permission required.

Japan, Transregional

EALL 300

Sinological Methods

Pauline Lin
Th 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Spring

An introduction to essential classical, modern, and electronic resources as preparation for in-depth research on China. The history of Chinese book collections, imperial and private. Bibliographies and bibliophiles; dictionaries; biographical, geographical, and religious sources; and literary, visual, and historical databases. The role of private libraries and research in the twenty-first century.

Prerequisite: reading knowledge of classical and modern Chinese. Formerly CHNS 202. Permission required.

China

EALL 302

Readings in Classical Chinese Prose

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This course is designed for students with a primary interest in pre-modern Chinese literature and culture.  Students will engage in close readings of canonical texts in classical Chinese, but modern baihua translations will be provided.  Readings vary from year to year, but in general the topics include the relationships between literature and politics, literary originality and influences, canonization and readership, etc. Discussions in class, and the required papers, will be in English.  However, students are strongly advised to take a literary Chinese course before taking this course.

Permission required.

China

EALL 303

Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Fundamentals of classical Chinese poetry and poetics. Readings vary from year to year, but in general topics include poetry and history, intertextuality, poetic reception, etc. Discussions in class, and the required papers, will be English.

Formerly CHNS 303. Permission required.

China

EALL 308, HUMS 305, PHIL 410

Sages of the Ancient World

Michael Hunter
M 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Comparative survey of the embodiment and performance of wisdom by ancient sages. Distinctive features and common themes in discourses about wisdom from China, India, the Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Topics include teaching, scheming, and dying.

Permission required.

China, Transregional

EALL 317

The Plum in the Golden Vase

Tina Lu
M 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Spring

Close reading of the late-sixteenth-century erotic novel The Plum in the Golden Vase in translation. The novel as a window on sixteenth-century Chinese society. Discussion of sexuality, commerce, and material culture. No knowledge of Chinese required.

Formerly CHNS 217. Permission Required.

China

EALL 357

Meiji Literature and Visual Culture

Seth Jacobowitz
M,W 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Fall

Introduction to the literature and visual culture of Meiji Japan (1868-1912), including novels, poetry, calligraphy, woodblock prints, painting, photography, and cinema. The relationship between theories and practices of fine art and literature; changes in word and image relations; transformations from woodblock to movable-type print culture; the invention of photography and early forms of cinematic practice. No knowledge of Japanese required.

Permission required.

Japan

EALL 470

Independent Tutorial

For students with advanced Chinese, Japanese, or Korean language skills who wish to engage in concentrated reading and research on literary works in a manner not otherwise offered in courses. The work must be supervised by a specialist and must terminate in a term paper or its equivalent. Ordinarily only one term may be offered toward the major or for credit toward the degree. Permission to enroll requires submission of a detailed project proposal by the end of the first week of classes and its approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 471

Independent Tutorial

For students with advanced Chinese, Japanese, or Korean language skills who wish to engage in concentrated reading and research on literary works in a manner not otherwise offered in courses. The work must be supervised by a specialist and must terminate in a term paper or its equivalent. Ordinarily only one term may be offered toward the major or for credit toward the degree. Permission to enroll requires submission of a detailed project proposal by the end of the first week of classes and its approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 506

Japan's Classics in Text and Image

Edward Kamens
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Fiction, poetry, and plays from the eighth century through the nineteenth, studied alongside related works of art and illustrated books housed in collections at Yale and in New York. An introduction to the Japanese classics as well as an example of interdisciplinary study in the humanities. No knowledge of Japanese required.

Japan

EALL 510

Man and Nature in Chinese Literature

Kang-I Chang
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

An exploration of man and nature in traditional Chinese literature, with special attention to aesthetic and cultural meanings.  Topics include the concept of nature and literature; the Neo-Taoist self-cultivation; poetry and Zen (Chan) Buddhism;  travel in literature; loss, lament, and self-reflection in song lyrics; nature and the supernatural in classical tales;  love and allusions to nature; religious pilgrimage and allegory (as seen in the novel The Journey to the West). Readings in translation. No knowledge of Chinese required.

China

EALL 516

Classical Tales from Tang to Qing

Tina Lu
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Close reading and translation of classical tales from the Tang, Ming, and Qing dynasties. Focus on strengthening students’ reading ability in classical Chinese. Attention to canonical Chinese narratives as well as some lesser-known texts. Discussion of themes such as romance, magical transformations, and proto-martial arts, including how these themes were transformed over time.

China

EALL 522

Kabuki Theater from Its Origins to the Present

William Fleming
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

The conventions, repertoire, and historical development of Kabuki theater since its origins in the early seventeenth century. The significance of the popular stage in early modern society; Kabuki’s influence on popular literature and adaptation into other media; the role of censorship and politics. No knowledge of Japanese required.

Japan

EALL 552, FILM 881

Japanese Cinema before 1960

Aaron Gerow
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM, Screenings T 7:00 PM - 9.30 PM
Fall

The history of Japanese cinema to 1960, including the social, cultural, and industrial backgrounds to its development. Periods covered include the silent era, the coming of sound and the wartime period, the occupation era, the golden age of the 1950s, and the new modernism of the late 1950s. No knowledge of Japanese required.

Japan

EALL 554

The Atomic Bombings of Japan in World Culture

Aaron Gerow, Ran Zwigenberg
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Survey of literary, artistic, and intellectual responses to the nuclear destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Focus on works from Japan, with some attention to literary and visual arts worldwide. Genres include fiction, poetry, theater, and film.  No knowledge of Japanese required.

Enrollment limited.

Japan

EALL 560, RLST 573

Sacred Place in Asia

Koichi Shinohara
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Critical examination of representative studies on sacred places in Asia.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 586

The Modern Novel in Brazil and Japan

Seth Jacobowitz
T 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Fall

Brazilian and Japanese novels from the late nineteenth century to the present. Representative texts from major authors are read in pairs to explore their commonalities and divergences. Topics include nineteenth-century realism and naturalism, the rise of mass culture and the avant-garde, and existentialism and postmodernism. No knowledge of Portuguese or Japanese required.

Japan, Transregional

EALL 600

Sinological Methods

Pauline Lin
Th 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Spring

An introduction to essential classical, modern, and electronic resources as preparation for in-depth research on China. The history of Chinese book collections, imperial and private. Bibliographies and bibliophiles; dictionaries; biographical, geographical, and religious sources; and literary, visual, and historical databases. The role of private libraries and research in the twenty-first century.

China

EALL 602

Readings in Classical Chinese Prose

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This course is designed for students with a primary interest in pre-modern Chinese literature and culture.  Students will engage in close readings of canonical texts in classical Chinese, but modern baihua translations will be provided.  Readings vary from year to year, but in general the topics include the relationships between literature and politics, literary originality and influences, canonization and readership, etc. Discussions in class, and the required papers, will be in English.  However, students are strongly advised to take a literary Chinese course before taking this course.

China

EALL 603

Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Fundamentals of classical Chinese poetry and poetics. Readings vary from year to year, but in general topics include poetry and history, intertextuality, poetic reception, etc. Discussions in class, and the required papers, will be English.

China

EALL 608

Sages of the Ancient World

Michael Hunter
M 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Comparative survey of the embodiment and performance of wisdom by ancient sages. Distinctive features and common themes in discourses about wisdom from China, India, the Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Topics include teaching, scheming, and dying.

China, Transregional

EALL 617

The Plum in the Golden Vase

Tina Lu
M 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Spring

Close reading of the late-sixteenth-century erotic novel The Plum in the Golden Vase in translation. The novel as a window on sixteenth-century Chinese society. Discussion of sexuality, commerce, and material culture. No knowledge of Chinese required.

China

EALL 657

Meiji Literature and Visual Culture

Seth Jacobowitz
M,W 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Fall

Introduction to the literature and visual culture of Meiji Japan (1868-1912), including novels, poetry, calligraphy, woodblock prints, painting, photography, and cinema. The relationship between theories and practices of fine art and literature; changes in word and image relations; transformations from woodblock to movable-type print culture; the invention of photography and early forms of cinematic practice. No knowledge of Japanese required.

Japan

EALL 708

Early Modern Japanese Literature

William Fleming
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Close reading of a wide range of prose, poetry, and drama from the Edo period (1600-1868), supplemented with relevant secondary scholarship; introduction to the reading of original materials in cursive calligraphic style (kuzushiji).

Japan

EALL 761

Topics in Early Chinese Thought

Michael Hunter
T 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Spring

An examination of certain key problems in the study of early Chinese thought. Topics vary from year to year but in general include intellectual typologies and affiliations, relating received texts and excavated manuscripts, the role of Han editors in shaping pre-Han textual traditions, ruling ideology, and comparisons with other parts of the ancient world. Discussions and papers are in English. Because readings are different each year, this course may be repeated for credit.

China

EALL 771, HIST 879

Readings in the Mencius, the Xunzi, and the Zhuangzi

Annping Chin
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

The course focuses on three Chinese texts from the Warring States period (481-221): the Mencius, the Xunzi, and the Zhuangzi. We consider not only the cognitive powers of the authors but also their distinct styles of argumentation and their art as storytellers and analogists. We explore the texts as historical sources and as means to understand the characters and the intellectual and aesthetic proclivities of the early Chinese professional elite (shi). Readings are in Chinese.

China

EALL 800

Natsume Soseki

Seth Jacobowitz
W 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Spring

This graduate seminar explores the major literary and theoretical writings of modern Japanese novelist Natsume Soseki (1867-1916). All readings will be done in Japanese, although provisions will be made for non-Japanese readers to participate as well. Readings will include London Tower, I am a Cat, Botchan, The Grass Pillow, Sanshiro, Mon, Kokoro, Travels to and fro in Manchuria and Korea, My Individualism and A Theory of Literature. Secondary sources in English and Japanese will also be read in tandem with the literary texts.

Japan

EALL 805, FILM 871

Readings in Japanese Film Theory

Aaron Gerow
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM, Screenings TBA
Fall

Theorizations of film and culture in Japan from the 1910s to the present. Through readings in the works of a variety of authors, the course explores both the articulations of cinema in Japanese intellectual discourse and how this embodies the shifting position of film in Japanese popular cultural history.

Japan

EALL 824, HIST 872

The Shenbao Lab: Explorations in Chinese Digital Humanities

Peter C. Perdue
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

The availability of abundant online sources in Chinese promises to reshape dramatically the ways in which we study modern Chinese history, but we need to gain experience in using new techniques of analysis of online digital sources. The complete online database of the text of the Shanghai newspaper Shenbao and part of its illustrated supplement, Dianshizhai Huabao, offers students new possibilities for looking at many topics of interest. These include the effects of mass journalism on public sentiments and the public sphere; the audiences of popular images and text; the relationship between elite writers and popular audiences; the overlapping and distinct appeals of literary tropes, mythology, news of Western affairs, and domestic news; and the impact of new technologies on Chinese urban society, among others. Students read these and other online materials and write research papers that use them for original perspectives in modern Chinese cultural and social history. Prerequisite: knowledge of classical and Chinese language. Open to qualified undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

China

EALL 900

Directed Readings



Spring

Offered by permission of instructor and DGS to meet special needs not met by regular courses.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 900

Directed Readings



Fall

Offered by permission of instructor and DGS to meet special needs not met by regular courses.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 900

Directed Research



Spring

Offered as needed with permission of instructor and DGS for student preparation of dissertation prospectus.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 900

Directed Research



Fall

Offered as needed with permission of instructor and DGS for student preparation of dissertation prospectus.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 013, RLST 013, SAST 056

The Dalai Lama

Andrew Quintman
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

The institution of the Dalai Lama and the individuals who filled that role from fifteenth-century Tibet to twenty-first-century exile in India. Survey of the most important Dalai Lamas; regional histories of Buddhism; the Tibetan tradition of recognized reincarnations and the Buddhist philosophical principles that support it; activities of the current Dalai Lama as interpreted by Chinese government media, Indian exile communities, and the modern West.

Permission required. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

China, Transregional, South Asia, Tibet

EAST 030, HIST 030, HUMS 083

Tokyo

Fabian Drixler
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Four centuries of Japan’s history through its superlative city and its many incarnations, destructions, and rebirths.  Focus on the solutions its people have found to the material and social challenges of concentrating such a large population in one place. Recurring themes include the tensions between continuity and impermanence, authenticity and modernity, social order and the culture of play.

Freshman seminar. Permission required.

Japan

EAST 212, PLSC 369

Politics in South and North Korea

Seok-Ju Cho
T,Th 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Introduction to the politics and political economies of South and North Korea. Investigation of different pathways taken by the two Koreas in attempts to achieve political and economic development. Application to Korean politics of theories in comparative politics, political processes, and international relations. Political institutions in the two Koreas, democratization and economic development in South Korea, and peacekeeping strategies on the Korean peninsula.

Korea

EAST 219, PLSC 179

China in World Politics

Jessica Weiss
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

China’s rise to prominence and its foreign relations from 1949 to the present, focusing on the post-Mao period.

China

EAST 221, HUMS 382

Chinese Political Thought

Loubna El Amine
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Classical works of Chinese political thought, their historical importance for the Chinese tradition, and their use in current academic and political debates. Readings from Confucianism, Mohism, and Taoism, as well as writings on statecraft and the art of war. Contemporary debates on the compatibility of Confucianism and democracy and on the East Asian challenge to the idea of human rights.

Permission required.

China

EAST 301, HIST 307

The Making of Japan's Great Peace, 1550-1850

Fabian Drixler
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Examination of how, after centuries of war in Japan and overseas, the Tokugawa shogunate built a peace that lasted more than 200 years. Japan’s urban revolution, the eradication of Christianity, the Japanese discovery of Europe, and the question whether Tokugawa Japan is a rare example of a complex and populous society that achieved ecological sustainability.

Japan

EAST 320, HIST 316

History of China, 1550 to the Present

Peter C. Perdue
T,Th 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Spring

Fall of the Ming and rise of the Qing dynasty. Political, economic, and cultural changes in China compared to those in East Asia and the rest of the world. China’s first Republic and the impact of foreign imperialism and communism. The People’s Republic of China under Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping; Taiwan from Chiang Kai-shek to the independence movement. Globalization, environmental stress, and human rights issues in historical perspective.

China

EAST 321, HIST 327J

Navigating Life in Nineteenth-Century Japan

Fabian Drixler
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

A study of the joys and sorrows of life in nineteenth-century Japan. Topics include finding a mate, becoming a parent, making and keeping friends, seeing the world, and coping with bereavement.

Permission required.

Japan

EAST 338, ECON 338, GLBL 318

The Next China

Stephen Roach
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Economic development in China since the late 1970s. Emphasis on factors pushing China toward a transition from its modern export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. The possibility of a resulting identity crisis, underscored by China’s need to embrace political reform and by the West’s long-standing misperceptions of China.

Prerequisite: introductory macroeconomics.

China

EAST 353, HSAR 353

Korean Art and Culture

Youn-mi Kim, Se-Woong Koo
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The history of Korea from ancient times to the present, with a focus on art and culture. Intersections of art, religion, and politics, as well as interaction with Chinese and Japanese cultures. The transmission of Buddhism and the formation of early Korean kingdoms; controversies regarding national identity; the premodern porcelain industry; Buddhism and Confucianism in politics and aesthetics; religion and art of the Japanese colonial period; contemporary popular culture. Includes a visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Korea

EAST 357, PLSC 390

State and Society in Post-Mao China

Jessica Weiss
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

State-society relations in the People’s Republic of China. Popular protest and social mobilization, media commercialization and the Internet, and prospects for political reform and democratization.

Permission required.

China

EAST 408, EP&E 269, SOCY 395

Wealth and Poverty in Modern China

Deborah Davis
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The underlying causes and consequences of the changing distribution of income, material assets, and political power in contemporary China. Substantive focus on inequality and stratification. Instruction in the use of online Chinese resources relevant to research. Optional weekly Chinese language discussions.

Prerequisite: a previous course on China since 1949. Permission required.

China

EAST 410, SOCY 310

Civil Society, Public Sphere, and Civic Life in Contemporary China

Deborah Davis
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Diverse models of urban development in China during the past thirty years, from global and Asian perspectives.

Prerequisite: a previous course on modern China or extended residence in Taiwan, Hong Kong, or the People's Republic of China. Preference to majors in Sociology or East Asian Studies in their junior and senior years. Permission required.

China

EAST 421, PLSC 440

Politics of China

Jeremy Wallace
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Introduction to Chinese political history of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, with emphasis on the past thirty years. Factionalism and elite politics, economic reforms, contemporary social movements, development, international relations, and inequality. Methods and approaches used by scholars to explore Chinese politics.

Permission required. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

EAST 422, HIST 311J

History and Nationalism in East Asia

Hyung-Wook Kim
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Modern conflicts among East Asian countries over the temporal and spatial boundaries and the ownership of the region’s ancient kingdoms. The role of such conflicts in contemporary territorial disputes; issues surrounding historical fact and interpretation; the presentation of sovereignty in early national histories; relations between nationalism, collective memory, and public commemoration.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 424, RLST 384

Religion and National Identity in Modern Korea

Se-Woong Koo
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Religion in modern Korea and its relation to the development of Korean national identity since c. 1900. Introduction of the modern concepts of religion and the nation-state in Korean culture. Ways in which various religious systems have been defined, categorized, managed, rewarded, and punished toward political ends. Both religion and nation as fundamental to Koreans’ overall conception of their collective identity.

Permission required.

Korea

EAST 425, EVST 420, HIST 313J

Asian Environments and Frontiers

Kwangmin Kim
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

The impact of Asian farmers, merchants, and states on the natural world. Focus on imperial China, with discussion of Japan, Southeast Asia, and Inner Asia in the early modern and modern periods. Themes include frontier conquest, land clearance, water conservancy, urban footprints, and relations between agrarian and nonagrarian peoples. Attention to environmental movements in Asia today.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Transregional, Southeast Asia

EAST 430, HIST 312J

Japanese Nationalism in Global Context

Nathan Hopson
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

The history and global context of modern nationalism; related questions regarding cultural identity in modern political contexts. Focus on Japan as a case study. The intersections of intellectual and cultural history with the complex politics of the modern world.

Permission required.

Japan

EAST 454, ECON 474, GLBL 312

Economic and Policy Lessons from Japan

Stephen Roach
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

An evaluation of Japan’s continuing economic problems and of the possibility that these problems might spread to other economies. Currency pressures, policy blunders, bubbles, denial, and Japan’s role in the global economic crisis of 2008; comparison between Japan’s economy and other major economies; dangers to the global economy from a protracted postcrisis recovery period. Focus on policy remedies to avert similar problems in other countries.

Prerequisite: a course in macroeconomics. Permission required.

Japan

EAST 470, HSAR 480

The Arts of Nomads in China, 900-1400

Youn-mi Kim
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Visual culture of the nomadic Kitans and Mongols, ranging from gold death masks and murals excavated from tombs to religious artworks that reflect hybrid and diverse religious practices. Arts produced during the empires founded by the Liao (907-1125) and Yuan (1279-1368) located in a broad transregional context, including their role in the cultural and political landscapes of East, Central, and South Asia from the tenth to fifteenth century.

Permission required.

China

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 491

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 492

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 501, SOCY 507

Social Science Workshop on Contemporary China

Deborah Davis
F 11:45 AM - 12:45 PM
Spring

A weekly workshop to encourage dialogue across disciplines among faculty, visiting professionals, and graduate students doing research in contemporary China. At each session, one Yale faculty, visitor, or advanced graduate student speaks briefly in regard to current work in progress. In most weeks, a paper or memo is circulated in advance, and each session allows for extensive discussion. One unit of course credit is available to students who attend 80 percent of the sessions in both terms and submit a thirty-page paper by April 25. Permission of the instructor required.

China

EAST 501, SOCY 507

Social Science Workshop on Contemporary China

Deborah Davis
F 11:45 AM - 12:45 PM
Fall

A weekly workshop to encourage dialogue across disciplines among faculty, visiting professionals, and graduate students doing research in contemporary China. At each session, one Yale faculty, visitor, or advanced graduate student speaks briefly in regard to current work in progress. In most weeks, a paper or memo is circulated in advance, and each session allows for extensive discussion. One unit of course credit is available to students who attend 80 percent of the sessions in both terms and submit a thirty-page paper by April 25. Permission of the instructor required.

China

EAST 519

China in World Politics

Jessica Weiss
MW 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

China’s rise to prominence and its foreign relations from 1949 to the present, focusing on the post-Mao period.

China

EAST 557

State and Society in Post-Mao China

Jessica Weiss
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

State-society relations in the People’s Republic of China. Popular protest and social mobilization, media commercialization and the Internet, and prospects for political reform and democratization.

China

EAST 596, SOCY 596

Wealth and Poverty in Modern China

Deborah Davis
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The underlying causes and consequences of the changing distribution of income, material assets, and political power in contemporary China. Substantive focus on inequality and stratification. Instruction in the use of online Chinese resources relevant to research. Optional weekly Chinese language discussions.

Permission of the instructor required.

China

GLBL 379, PLSC 132

China's International Relations

Jessica Weiss
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Analysis of contemporary Chinese diplomacy, including China’s increasing regional and global influence. Mainstream concepts and theories in international relations applied to current events and policy debates.

Permission required. Priority to majors in Political Science and in Global Affairs.

China

GLBL 618, MGT 911

The Next China

Stephen Roach
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Born out of necessity in the post-Cultural Revolution chaos of the late 1970s, modern China is about reforms, opening up, and transition. The Next China will be driven by the transition from an export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. China’s new model could unmask a dual identity crisis-underscored by China’s need to embrace political reform and the West’s long-standing misperceptions about China.

Prerequisite: basic undergraduate macroeconomics.

China

HIST 138J

History of U.S.-China Relations

Tao Wang
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The complex bilateral relationship between China and the United States explored from the perspectives of both countries, from its beginnings in the mid-nineteenth century through the early twenty-first. Major events and significant policies in Sino-American interaction as it developed to the state of current relations.

Permission required.

China, Transregional

HIST 303

Japan's Modern Revolution

Daniel Botsman
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

A survey of Japan’s transformation over the course of the nineteenth century from an isolated, traditional society on the edge of northeast Asia to a modern imperial power. Aspects of political, social, and cultural history.

Japan

HIST 314, HUMS 426

Early Sources in Chinese Intellectual Traditions

Annping Chin
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Readings in translation of the basic texts of Confucianism, Taoism, and legalism. Examination of what the early Chinese thought about the world and themselves, how they articulated what they thought and organized what they knew, and how they explored the irrational and issues such as fairness and moral appropriateness.

China

HIST 320J

Non-Chinese Dynasties in China, 1004-1911

Valerie Hansen
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Study of four dynasties whose emperors were ethnically non-Chinese: the Kitan, the Jurchen, the Mongols, and the Manchu. Ways in which they shaped the last 1000 years of China’s dynastic history. Focus on techniques used by these dynasties to exploit traditional China’s weaknesses, including military strategy, the use of Chinese collaborators and technologies, and cultural adaptivity.

Permission required.

China

HIST 379J, HSHM 447

History of Chinese Science

William Summers
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Major themes in Chinese scientific thinking from antiquity to the twentieth century. Non-Western concepts of nature and the development of science in China; East-West scientific exchanges; and China’s role in modern science.

Permission required. This course meets during Reading Period.

China

HIST 470

World Finance, Mesopotamia to the Present

Valerie Hansen, William Goetzmann
M,W 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Fall

The history of finance from its earliest beginnings to the modern era, with particular attention to Mesopotamia, China, and Europe. The time value of money, including loans and interest; the negotiability of claims within a legal structure that handles claims; the ability to contract on future outcomes through life insurance and derivatives; corporations; causes and outcomes of economic bubbles.

This course meets during Reading Period.

China, Transregional

HIST 867

Social History of the Chinese Silk Road

Valerie Hansen
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

An introduction to artifacts and documents excavated from the most important sites on the Northern and Southern Silk Routes in China, including Niya, Kizil, Turfan, and Dunhuang. All assigned readings in English, but given sufficient student interest, a separate section can be formed for those wishing to read documents in classical Chinese from Turfan and Dunhuang.

China

HIST 869

Issues in Tang, Song, and Yuan History

Valerie Hansen
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

An introduction to the debates about Chinese history between 600 and 1400 including economics, gender, printing, religion, and social change.

China

HIST 878

Readings in Japanese History to 1900

Fabian Drixler
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

A critical introduction to debates in the history of Japan up to about 1900, with particular emphasis on the Tokugawa and Meiji periods but some coverage of earlier times as well. This year’s seminar focuses particularly on debates in social, economic, and environmental history. Readings are in English but, depending on student interest, supplemental materials may also be assigned in Japanese.

Japan

HIST 880

Japanese Reference Works and Documents

Daniel Botsman
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Provides training in the use of reference works and an introduction to the specialist skills needed to undertake research in pre-20th century Japanese history. Emphasis will be on learning documents written in the so-called “epistolary style” (sōrōbun) and to exploring Yale’s rich collection of pre-modern source materials.

Japan

HIST 911, HSHM 680

History of Chinese Science

William Summers
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A study of the major themes in Chinese scientific thinking from antiquity to the twentieth century. Emphasis on non-Western concepts of nature and the development of science in China, East-West scientific exchanges, and China’s role in modern science.

China

HSAR 142, RLST 187, SAST 265

Introduction to the History of Art: The Classical Buddhist World

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Buddhist art and architecture of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Central Asia from earliest beginnings to the tenth century, and including Greco-Roman, Persian, and Islamic contact.

China, Transregional, South Asia

HSAR 143, RLST 188, SAST 260

Introduction to the History of Art: Buddhist Art and Architecture, 900 to 1600

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Buddhist art and architecture of East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Tibet from the tenth century to the early modern period. Emphasis on cross-regional engagements including the impact of Islam.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Tibet

HSAR 354, HUMS 451

East-West Encounters in Chinese Art

Youn-mi Kim
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Cultural exchanges between Europe, North America, and Asia from the seventeenth to twenty-first centuries, with a focus on Chinese arts and crafts. The influence of Chinese porcelain, decorative art, and architecture on interior and garden design in Europe; the role of Japanese woodblock prints in European and American art; Chinese artists, the Western oil painting tradition, and the tension between tradition and modernization; contemporary works that attempt to bridge the past.

China, Transregional

HSAR 475

Chinese Painting in the Seventeenth Century

David Sensabaugh
Th 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Spring

Chinese painting from the masters of the late Ming period to the individualist and orthodox masters of the early Qing dynasty. Issues of art based on either art or nature. Attention to paintings from the period in the Yale University Art Gallery collection.

Permission required.

China

HSAR 813

Relic, Image, and Body in the Buddhist Tradition

Youn-mi Kim
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Worship of relics and images is commonly observed in various religious traditions. As such, relic and image worship has comprised core doctrinal debates and shaped religious practices across many religions. Debates about the relic and body inevitably involved the notion of divine bodies as well as human bodies. Using the Buddhist tradition as a focal point, this course considers the issues of the relic, image, and body from a broad cross-cultural context. Topics to be discussed include the controversial aniconic period from early Buddhist history in India; the competition for religious authority between early Buddha images and Buddha relics; stories of miracles performed by relics and images; the understanding of the relationship between the image and the physical body of Buddha by medieval Chinese; the development of the theory of Three Buddha Bodies and their visual representations in China and Korea; and contradictory views of the female body in Buddhism. Students are encouraged to bring insights from their own perspectives and cultural traditions from the West, the Near and Middle East, and other regions of Asia.

China, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

HUMS 449, RLST 190, SAST 466

Narrative Space in Asian Religions

Phyllis Granoff, Koichi Shinohara
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

The many spaces of Asian religious practice, good and bad, real and imaginary, explored through readings from Indian, Chinese, and Japanese texts in translation.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Transregional, South Asia

JAPN 110

Elementary Japanese I

Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura, Aoi Saito
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An introductory language course for students with no previous background in Japanese. Development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, including characters of 50 hiragana, 50 katakana, and 75 kanji. Introduction of cultural aspects such as levels of politeness. In-class drills in pronunciation and conversation. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills. Credit only on completion of JAPN 120b.

This course meets during Reading Period.

Japan

JAPN 120

Elementary Japanese II

Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura, Aoi Saito, Mari Stever
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 110a, with supplementary materials such as excerpts from television shows, anime, and songs. Introduction of 150 additional kanji.

Prerequisite: JAPN 110a or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

Japan

JAPN 130

Intermediate Japanese I

Yoshiko Maruyama, Masahiko Seto
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Continued development in both written and spoken Japanese. Introduction to aspects of Japanese culture such as history, art, religion, and cuisine through text, film, and animation. Web-based audio and visual aids facilitate learning. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

Prerequisite: JAPN 120b or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

Japan

JAPN 140

Intermediate Japanese II

Yoshiko Maruyama, Masahiko Seto
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 130a.

Prerequisite: Japanese 130a or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

Japan

JAPN 150

Advanced Japanese I

Mari Stever
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Advanced language course that further develops proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Japanese anime and television dramas are used to enhance listening and speaking skills. Writing of essays, letters, and criticism solidifies grammar and style. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

Prerequisite: JAPN 140b or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

Japan

JAPN 151

Advanced Japanese II

Yoshiko Maruyama, Mari Stever
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 150a.

Prerequisite: JAPN 150a or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

Japan

JAPN 156

Advanced Japanese III

Koichi Hiroe
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Close reading of modern Japanese writings in current affairs, social science, cultural history, and modern literature. Students develop their speaking, listening, and writing skills through discussion and written exercises. Drama and films are included.

Prerequisite: JAPN 151b or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 157

Advanced Japanese IV

Koichi Hiroe, Michiaki Murata
M,W,F 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 156a.

Prerequisite: JAPN 156a or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 162

Reading Academic Japanese I

Masahiko Seto
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Further development of skills used in academic settings, including public speaking, formal presentations, and expository writing based on research. Materials include lectures, scholarly papers, criticism, fiction, and films.

Prerequisite: JAPN 157b or equivalent; recommended to be taken after or concurrently with JAPN 170a.

Japan

JAPN 163

Reading Academic Japanese II

Masahiko Seto
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 162a.

Prerequisite: JAPN 162a or equivalent; recommended to be taken after JAPN 170a.

Japan

JAPN 164

Academic and Professional Spoken Japanese

Koichi Hiroe
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on the speaking skills necessary for academic and professional settings. Includes online interviews, discussions, and debates with native Japanese students and scholars on contemporary topics such as globalization, environment, technology, human rights, and cultural studies. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

Prerequisite: JAPN 157b or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 165

Academic and Professional Spoken Japanese

Koichi Hiroe
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on the speaking skills necessary for academic and professional settings. Includes online interviews, discussions, and debates with native Japanese students and scholars on contemporary topics such as globalization, environment, technology, human rights, and cultural studies. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

Prerequisite: JAPN 157b or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 169

Literature and the Humanities

John Treat
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Canonical Japanese short stories and essays read in line-by-line translation. Use of reference works and the Internet to research structures and vocabulary. Designed to help students at the fourth-year level of modern Japanese prepare for either graduate-level courses in Japanese literature or independent study of written Japanese.

Prerequisite: JAPN 151b or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 170

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Edward Kamens
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151b or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 171

Readings in Literary Japanese

William Fleming
M,W 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Close analytical reading of a selection of texts from the Nara through the Tokugawa periods: prose, poetry, and various genres. Introduction to kanbun.

After JAPN 170a or equivalent. Permission required.

Japan

JAPN 569

Literature and the Humanities

John Treat
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Canonical Japanese short stories and essays read in line-by-line translation. Use of reference works and the Internet to research structures and vocabulary. Designed to help students at the fourth-year level of modern Japanese prepare for either graduate-level courses in Japanese literature or independent study of written Japanese.

Japan

JAPN 570

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Edward Kamens
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

Japan

JAPN 571

Readings in Literary Japanese

William Fleming
M,W 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Close analytical reading of a selection of texts from the Nara through the Tokugawa periods: prose, poetry, and various genres. Introduction to kanbun.

Japan

KREN 110

Elementary Korean I

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

A beginning course in modern Korean. Pronunciation, lectures on grammar, conversation practice, and introduction to the writing system (Hankul). Credit only on completion of KREN 120b.

This course meets during Reading Period.

Korea

KREN 120

Elementary Korean II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 110a.

Prerequisite: KREN 110a or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

Korea

KREN 130

Intermediate Korean I

Junghwa Lee
M,T,W,Th,F 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Continued development of skills in modern Korean, spoken and written, leading to intermediate-level proficiency.

Prerequisite: KREN 120b or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

Korea

KREN 132

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners I

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Intended for students with some oral proficiency but little or no training in Hankul. Focus on grammatical analysis, the standard spoken language, and intensive training in reading and writing.

This course meets during Reading Period.

Korea

KREN 140

Intermediate Korean II

Junghwa Lee
M,T,W,Th,F 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 130a.

Prerequisite: KREN 130a or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

Korea

KREN 142

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 132a.

Prerequisite: KREN 132a or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

Korea

KREN 150

Advanced Korean I

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An advanced language course with emphasis on development of vocabulary and grammar, practice in reading comprehension, speaking on a variety of topics, and writing in both formal and informal styles. Use of storytelling, discussion, peer group activities, audio and written journals, oral presentations, and supplemental audiovisual materials and texts. Intended for non-heritage speakers.

Prerequisite: KREN 140b or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

Korea

KREN 151

Advanced Korean II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 150a.

Prerequisite: KREN 150a or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

Korea

KREN 152

Advanced Korean for Advanced Learners

Seungja Choi
M,W,F 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

An advanced course in modern Korean. Reading of short stories, essays, and journal articles, and introduction of 200 Chinese characters. Students develop their speaking and writing skills through discussions and written exercises.

Prerequisite: KREN 142b, KREN 151b, or with permission of the instructor.

Korea

KREN 153

Advanced Korean for Advanced Learners

Seungja Choi
M,W,F 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

An advanced course in modern Korean. Reading of short stories, essays, and journal articles, and introduction of 200 Chinese characters. Students develop their speaking and writing skills through discussions and written exercises.

Prerequisite: KREN 142b, KREN 151b, or with permission of the instructor.

Korea

KREN 154

Advanced Korean III

Seungja Choi
W 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Spring

An advanced language course designed to develop reading and writing skills using Web-based texts in a variety of genres such as editorials and essays. Students read texts independently and complete comprehension and vocabulary exercises through the Web. Discussion, tests, and intensive writing training in class.

Prerequisite: KREN 151b or equivalent.

Korea

PLSC 686

China’s International Relations

Jessica Weiss
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

In this seminar, students think deeply and critically about China’s growing influence and foreign relations. Topics include power transitions, deterrence and reassurance, nationalism and sovereignty, public opinion, leadership, perceptions and misperceptions, soft power and public diplomacy, and regional balancing and alliances. Each week includes applications to current events and debates, including China’s activities in the South China Sea, the U.S. “pivot” to Asia, relations with neighboring countries, crises in U.S.-China relations, and the so-called China model.

China

REL 616

Introduction to Asian Christianity: East Asia

Chloe Starr
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This course introduces students to some of the themes and key thinkers in twentieth century theology in Japan, Taiwan and Korea. It surveys different theological movements within these countries (such as ‘homeland theology,’ Minjung theology etc.) and encourages the development of a critical response to the challenges that these theologies raise for both non-Asians and Asians. The course considers contextualization and inculturation debates in each of these societies, as well as regional responses to Christianity. We read primary texts in English, with background reading for context, and students will be encouraged to develop their own responses to the authors and their thought.

Japan, Korea, Transregional, Taiwan

REL 940

Chinese Christian Theologians

Chloe Starr
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This course examines select readings from mainland Chinese church and academic theologians (including post-1997 Hong Kong writers) to explore the nature of Chinese Christian thought. The readings come from four eras: late imperial Roman Catholic writers; early Republican Protestant thinkers; high communist era church theologians, and contemporary Sino-Christian academic theologians. We will be reading primary materials in English, supplemented by background studies and lecture material to help make sense of the theological constructions that emerge. The course encourages reflection on the challenges for Christian mission in a communist context, on the tensions between church and state in the production of theologies, and on the challenges that Chinese Christianity poses for global Christian thought.

China

RLST 383, SAST 467

Biography in Asian Religions

Andrew Quintman
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

The significance of life writing in the religious traditions of Asia. Readings both from primary texts in translation and from theoretical works on biography and autobiography.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

RLST 583, SAST 567

Biography in Asian Religions

Andrew Quintman
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

The significance of life writing in the religious traditions of Asia. Readings both from primary texts in translation and from theoretical works on biography and autobiography.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

RLST 585

Material Culture in Asian Religions

Koichi Shinohara
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This seminar is designed as a forum in which students can begin developing substantial research papers in their respective fields of specialization. The term begins with a series of assigned readings; participants are asked to post reading responses for the entire class each week and come to class prepared to discuss each other’s responses. The second half of the course is devoted to the presentation of paper proposals and focused discussions of the previously circulated examples of primary source material on which the arguments in the research papers are to be based.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

SOCY 086

Chinese Society since Mao

Deborah Davis
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

An overview of the major social institutions in contemporary China, with a focus on the changing relationship between individual and society. Use of print and visual sources to explore the social consequences of China’s recent retreat from socialism and its rapid integration into the global economy.

Permission required. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

China