CEAS Colloquium Series

Event
Posted : January 26, 2023

No scholar of modern Chinese literary studies in its globalizing mode will miss the recent spotlight on Malaysian Chinese (Mahua) literature. Previously untapped, works from or about the Southeast Asian country are now read for bracing ideas on language, ethnicity, and diaspora. In Malaysian Crossings: Place and Language in the Worlding of Modern Chinese Literature, Chan shows how the minor literary formation’s grasp of its own marginality in the world-Chinese literary space constitutes the threshold—instead of a hurdle—to creating signature aesthetic imprints that foster global outlooks. In...

Event
Posted : January 26, 2023

China’s rural-urban divide and local-non-local distinctions sustained by the hukou (household registration) system continue to shape the life trajectories of millions of internal migrants, a large number of who are being channeled to return to their registered hometowns and villages. Drawing on long-term fieldwork in both rural and urban ends, this talk examines how migrants prepare for a presumed but indeterminate rural-bound return by showcasing some of the “material symbols of return” - objects in rural households, including the physical house itself - enabled or brought in by migrants....

Event
Posted : January 26, 2023

This is a two-part talk. First, I propose that the popularity of K-Pop in the west has transformative possibilities for the lived experiences of Asian Americans. I will introduce K-Pop and BTS in particular. Second, I will present a working paper (co-authored with Wonseok Lee, School of Music, Ohio State University) titled, “Are Friends Electric? The Influence of 1980s British New Wave on 2020s K-Pop.” Given the centrality of the music video to the development of both K-pop and the British New Wave, we argue that there is a shared musical and visual aesthetic between these two genres. Our...

Event
Posted : January 23, 2023

Myung-chul Yoon is professor emeritus of history at Dongguk University and professor of archeology at Samarkand State University of Uzbekistan. His research focuses on the history of Goguryeo as well as East Asian maritime history. He has published over 60 books and numerous journal articles. He is also a poet and explorer and has published 14 poetry books. Supported by The Kim Hongnam Korean Studies Fund

Event
Posted : January 19, 2023

Shamanism is the oldest human religious phenomenon and practice. Korean shamanism, called Muism, goes back to prehistoric times, and archeological evidence suggests that it was part of Bronze age culture. During the Three Kingdoms period, the role of the shaman was integrated into the position of kings and other political officials. Korean shamanism evolved from a male-centered practice where the role was heavily politicized to primarily being performed by women in much more informal settings during modern times. There has been a systematic suppression and persecution of shamans, called...

Event
Posted : January 18, 2023

In the war of Japan’s invasion of Chosŏn Korea (1592-1598) in which Ming China was involved, the three countries were all vigorously engaged in diplomacy while fighting on and off. In fact, diplomacy occupied a far longer period than what military confrontation did in this seven-year war. However, historians in the field by and large ignore Chosŏn Korea’s diplomatic agency. In particular, when it comes to a discussion of the diplomatic attempt from mid-1593 to 1596 for truce, Chosŏn Korea is missing. The discussion is almost invariably focused on the negotiations between Japan and Ming China...

Event
Posted : January 13, 2023

This presentation tells a story of Nanjido – how an island that served as a landfill for Seoul from 1978 to 1993 was transformed into an ecological park called World Cup Park in preparation for the 2002 FIFA World Cup. It discusses how this mega-event instigated an urban planning focusing on ecological restoration and urban regeneration and how the history of Nanjido was subsequently framed as the undoing of the industrial past of the city, most notably seen in its waste management. The story of this contested space is told through a close reading of two documentary sources: The Millennium...

Event
Posted : January 13, 2023

Jidaigeki (Japanese period films set prior to 1868) presented a unique challenge for envisioning postwar modernity and democracy in Japan. US Occupation censors and progressive Japanese critics alike regarded jidaigeki with suspicion, calling into question its relationship to the past as a potential threat to the (re)construction process of postwar Japan. Reflecting on the aftermath of WWII in the emerging Cold War context of Japan’s compromised sovereignty, postwar Japanese intellectual Tsurumi Shunsuke, however, defended jidaigeki as political thought based in the lived experience of “the...

Event
Posted : January 10, 2023

This talk is being held in tandem with a screening of Suzuki Seijun’s Satan’s Town on February 12. Suzuki Seijun was fired by Nikkatsu Studios in 1968, which became a watershed moment in the collapse of Japan’s studio system. As a result of this, Suzuki has typically been understood in opposition to Nikkatsu and the studio system, in spite of the fact that he made 40 feature films there, including his earliest formative films and many of the films for which he is most famous. This presentation...

Event
Posted : January 5, 2023

Jipbap is the term that Koreans use for meals cooked at home. People often think home meals are ordinary, mundane and unnecessary to analyze. However, in recent decades a discourse on jipbap has emerged in print and visual media. In this presentation I approach jipbap as a historical concept that is varied, contested, and shifting. It intersects with aspects of gender, class, place, and age, among other factors; therefore, jipbap offers an expedient lens for investigating the changing gender dynamics and the interplay between the public and the private. I specifically ask: why has jipbap ...

Event
Posted : November 14, 2022

The high mobility required by government service meant that Tang elites were no stranger to long-distance travel. Because most Tang officials would bring their immediate family to their new post, it was inevitable that they or family members might die while traveling or sojourning abroad. As familial joint-burial was the norm and an indicator of social respectability, whether a family returned a loved one’s remains to the family graveyard for burial was closely scrutinized. Families therefore increasingly turned to entombed epitaph inscriptions (muzhiming) to explain delays or...

Event
Posted : November 4, 2022

The ancient site of Khādalik, near the oasis of Khotan in the Central Asian Silk Road, was visited by early explorers of the area such as Ellsworth Huntington (1876–1947) and Aurel Stein (1862–1943). They found a shrine surrounded by an elaborate and exquisitely frescoed maze that pilgrims would have had to traverse in order to reach the inner sanctum. This sacred path was scattered with fragments of sacred Buddhist books probably left as offerings: The books were written in Sanskrit, Chinese, and the now extinct Iranian language of the kingdom at the time, Khotanese. Stein alone brought...

Event
Posted : November 1, 2022

Please register for this talk via Zoom https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_MU4qt_orRM23JvmzN8y71w I argue that the Chinese government has implemented human-based social grid management and automated surveillance camera system nationwide, which allows the government to detect mobilization attempts and prevent them from becoming collective action. Using large-scale street view image and text data and machine learning, I developed innovative measurements for the density and implementations of surveillance systems...

Event
Posted : October 28, 2022

Highlighting major shortcomings of the traditional models of civil religion, Professor Lee’s talk will introduce the religious thought of Ham Sok Hon (1901-1989), arguably the most influential religious-political activist in modern Korea and a two-time nominee for the Nobel Peace Prize. He attempts to continue the conversation of civil religion of the world, which Robert Bellah expressed despondently in his 1967 essay by saying “flickering flame of the United Nations.” Lee points out that the popular frameworks by classical theorists such as Durkheim and Rousseau have long shaped the general...

Event
Posted : October 6, 2022

This talk will introduce some novelists around 1930 as Showa modan literature to examine the historical meaning of Japanese modernism. What was Japanese modernism? I have been thinking about this question. In 2005, I published my doctoral dissertation on Japanese avant-garde as a monograph. Around the same time, several monographs on Japanese modernism were published in the United States. Their analyses from the perspective of gender, mass culture, and colonialism still show me the way to the future of research on modernist literature. What does a researcher from Japan think about Japanese...

Event
Posted : October 6, 2022

The King’s Road offers a new interpretation of the history of the Silk Road, emphasizing its importance as a diplomatic route, rather than a commercial one. Tracing the arduous journeys of diplomatic envoys, Xin Wen presents a rich social history of long-distance travel that played out in deserts, post stations, palaces, and polo fields. The book tells the story of the everyday lives of diplomatic travelers on the Silk Road—what they ate and drank, the gifts they carried, and the animals that accompanied them—and how they navigated a complex web of geographic, cultural, and linguistic...

Event
Posted : October 6, 2022

Our perception of Chinese engagement with “exotic” maritime commodities is strongly colored by the work of Edward Schafer (Golden Peaches of Samarkand; Vermilion Bird), who focused on the experience of connoisseurs during the Tang Empire. Though Schafer’s work was groundbreaking for its time, it has left us with some misperceptions. The system of maritime commodity trade was in fact developed under the Jiankang Empire (a.k.a. the Chinese southern dynasties, 3rd-6th centuries CE), whose ruling class had much closer ties to the Southeast Asian traders who actually built and operated the network...

Event
Posted : October 3, 2022

The past several years have witnessed a shift in Chinese state policy regarding religion and the gradual diminishment of the state’s relative lenience towards religion In the early reform era. Much of the change is focused on visibility and public spaces, including the removal of crosses, the remodeling of mosques and the destruction of large Buddhist and Daoist statues. Based on Henri Lefebvre’s theory of state space production, this lecture is an attempt to examine the changes of the past decade focusing primarily on Christianity and Islam and the ways in which Chinese...

Event
Posted : September 27, 2022

*Please note this event is scheduled to begin at 9:25am Please register for this Zoom event here The Buddho-Daoist group of bas-reliefs crudely carved on the cliff of Kongwangshan 孔望山 in Lianyungang 連雲港 (Jiangsu) has been widely reputed to date to the late Eastern Han (25–220 CE), following the report of the preliminary survey published in 1981 and the authority, among others, of the late Yu Weichao 俞偉超 (1933–2003). Rather recently, the date has been reaffirmed by the final site report published in 2010. But the...

Event
Posted : September 26, 2022

This talk introduces the main thesis of the speaker’s forthcoming book, Spatial Dunhuang: Experiencing the Dunhuang Caves, which experiments with a new way of analyzing Dunhuang art—and Buddhist grottoes in general. Starting from re-examining the Mogao Caves through the perspective of space, this analysis also leads us to think about the complicated temporalities of this large cave complex. Wu Hung has published widely on both traditional and contemporary Chinese art. His interest in both traditional and modern/contemporary Chinese art has led him to experiment with different ways to...

Pages

Subscribe to CEAS Colloquium Series