CEAS Courses 2020-2021

This list is subject to modification.

Some of the information contained here may have changed since the time of publication. Always check with the department under which the course is listed or on Yale University Course Search to make sure that the courses you are interested in are still being offered and that the times have not changed.

If you have questions about any of the courses listed here, please contact the offering department directly.

ANTH 213, EAST 313

Postwar Japan: Ghosts of Modernity

Yukiko Koga
M 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

This course introduces students to contemporary Japan, examining how its defeat in the Second World War and loss of empire in 1945 continue to shape Japanese culture and society. Looking especially at the sphere of cultural production, it focuses on the question of what it means to be modern as expressed through the tension between resurgent neo-nationalism and the aspiration to internationalize. The course charts how the legacy of Japan’s imperial failure plays a significant role in its search for renewal and identity since 1945. How, it asks, does the experience of catastrophic failure—and failure to account for that failure—play into continued aspirations for modernity today? How does Japanese society wrestle with modernity’s two faces: its promise for progress and its history of catastrophic violence? The course follows the trajectory of Japan’s postwar nation-state development after the dissolution of empire, from its resurrection from the ashes after defeat, to its identity as a US ally and economic superpower during the Cold War, to decades of recession since the 1990s and the search for new relations with its neighbors and new reckonings with its own imperial violence and postwar inactions against the background of rising neonationalism.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

ANTH 342

Cultures and Markets in Asia

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Historical and contemporary movements of people, goods, and cultural meanings that have defined Asia as a region. Reexamination of state-centered conceptualizations of Asia and of established boundaries in regional studies. The intersections of transregional institutions and local societies and their effects on trading empires, religious traditions, colonial encounters, and cultural fusion. Finance flows that connect East Asia and the Indian Ocean to the Middle East and Africa. The cultures of capital and market in the neoliberal and postsocialist world.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

ANTH 355, AFST 355, EAST 351

China-Africa Encounters

Helen Siu
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

The history, effects, and implications of Chinese involvement in and with African countries over the past century. Diasporic experiences, with attention to informal economies, cultural strategies, and ethnic and religious tensions; land, finance, and infrastructure; Chinese aid and development in Africa since the late 1960s, including medical aid and charitable groups.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional

ANTH 362

Unity and Diversity in Chinese Culture

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

An exploration of the Chinese identity as it has been reworked over the centuries. Major works in Chinese anthropology and their intellectual connections with general anthropology and historical studies. Topics include kinship and marriage, marketing systems, rituals and popular religion, ethnicity and state making, and the cultural nexus of power.

Permission of instructor required.

China

ANTH 415

Culture, History, Power, and Representation

Helen Siu
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A critical introduction to anthropological formulations of the junctures of meaning, interest, and power. Readings include classical and contemporary ethnographies that are theoretically informed and historically situated.

This course meets during reading period. Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional

ANTH 515

Culture, History, Power, and Representation

Helen Siu
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A critical introduction to anthropological formulations of the junctures of meaning, interest, and power. Readings include classical and contemporary ethnographies that are theoretically informed and historically situated.

China, Transregional

ANTH 542

Cultures and Markets: Asia Connected through Time and Space

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Historical and contemporary movements of people, goods, and cultural meanings that have defined Asia as a region. Reexamination of state-centered conceptualizations of Asia and of established boundaries in regional studies. The intersections of transregional institutions and local societies and their effects on trading empires, religious traditions, colonial encounters, and cultural fusion. Finance flows that connect East Asia and the Indian Ocean to the Middle East and Africa. The cultures of capital and market in the neoliberal and postsocialist world.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

ANTH 555

China-Africa Encounters

Helen Siu
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

The seminar focuses on layered structures that linked China and Africa in a broad “Asian” context. It cuts through policy polemics to provide historically informed and ethnographically nuanced perspectives. The density and diversity of Chinese activities in Africa have grown dramatically in the past decade, colored by volatile markets and the global reach of China for oil and for agricultural and mineral commodities. Themes to explore include diasporic experiences (informal economies, cultural strategies, ethnic and religious tensions in migrant communities); land, finance, infrastructure, and daily lives (the intertwined worlds of state planners, global investors, and local communities); and the meaning of aid and development (comparisons between postcolonial, neoliberal and late-socialist models and long-term societal impact).

China, Transregional

ANTH 562

Unity and Diversity in Chinese Culture

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

An exploration of the Chinese identity as it has been reworked over the centuries. Major works in Chinese anthropology and their intellectual connections with general anthropology and historical studies. Topics include kinship and marriage, marketing systems, rituals and popular religion, ethnicity and state making, and the cultural nexus of power.

China

ANTH 759, ARCG 759

Social Complexity in Ancient China

Anne Underhill
M 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

This seminar explores the variety of archaeological methods and theoretical approaches that have been employed to investigate the development and nature of social complexity in ancient China. The session meetings focus on the later prehistoric and early historic periods, and several geographic regions are included. They also consider how developments in ancient China compare to other areas of the world. Most of the readings emphasize archaeological remains, although relevant information from early historical texts is considered.

China

ARCH 3240

Spatial Concepts of Japan

Yoko Kawai
W 2:00 PM - 3:50 PM
Fall

The seminar explores the origins and developments of Japanese spatial concepts and surveys how they help form the contemporary architecture, ways of life, and cities of the country. Many Japanese spatial concepts, such as MA, are about creating time-space distances and relationship between objects, people, space, and experiences. These concepts go beyond the fabric of a built structure, and encompass architecture, landscape, and city. Each class is designed around one or two Japanese words that signify particular design concepts. Each week, a lecture on the word(s) with its design features, backgrounds, historical examples, and contemporary application is followed by student discussion. Contemporary works studied include those by Maki, Isozaki, Ando, Ito, SANAA, and Fujimoto. The urbanism and landscape of Tokyo and Kyoto are discussed. Students are required to make in-class presentations and write a final paper. 

Limited enrollment

Japan

ARCH 341, GLBL 253, LAST 318, URBN 341

Globalization Space

Keller Easterling
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Infrastructure space as a primary medium of change in global polity. Networks of trade, energy, communication, transportation, spatial products, finance, management, and labor, as well as new strains of political opportunity that reside within their spatial disposition. Case studies include free zones and automated ports around the world, satellite urbanism in South Asia, high-speed rail in Japan and the Middle East, agripoles in southern Spain, fiber optic submarine cable in East Africa, spatial products of tourism in North Korea, and management platforms of the International Organization for Standardization.

Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

CHNS 110

Elementary Modern Chinese I

Rongzhen Li, Yu-Lin Wang Saussy, Jianhua Shen, Yongtao Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM, 4:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Intended for students with no background in Chinese. An intensive course with emphasis on spoken language and drills. Pronunciation, grammatical analysis, conversation practice, and introduction to reading and writing Chinese characters.

This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 112

Elementary Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Hsiu-hsien Chan
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 AM
Fall

First level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with some aural proficiency but very limited ability in reading and writing Chinese. Training in listening and speaking, with emphasis on reading and writing.

Placement confirmed by placement test and by instructor.

China

CHNS 120

Elementary Modern Chinese II

Rongzhen Li, Jianhua Shen, Yu-Lin Wang Saussy, Yongtao Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 110.

After CHNS 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 122

Elementary Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Hsiu-hsien Chan
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 112.

China

CHNS 130

Intermediate Modern Chinese I

Ninghui Liang, Chuanmei Sun, Haiwen Wang, Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM, 4:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

An intermediate course that continues intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and consolidates achievements from the first year of study. Students improve oral fluency, study more complex grammatical structures, and enlarge both reading and writing vocabulary.

After CHNS 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 132

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Min Chen, Fan Liu
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM, 4:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate oral proficiency and elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them.

After CHNS 122 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 140

Intermediate Modern Chinese II

Ninghui Liang, Chuanmei Sun, Haiwen Wang, Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 130. To be followed by CHNS 150.

After CHNS 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 142

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Min Chen, Fan Liu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 132.

After CHNS 132 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 150

Advanced Modern Chinese I

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Chuanmei Sun, Yu-Lin Wang Saussy
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM, 4:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Third level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Use of audiovisual materials, oral presentations, skits, and longer and more frequent writing assignments to assimilate more sophisticated grammatical structures. Further introduction to a wide variety of written forms and styles. Use of both traditional and simplified forms of Chinese characters.

After CHNS 140 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 151

Advanced Modern Chinese II

Rongzhen Li, Chuanmei Sun, Yu-Lin Wang Saussy
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 PM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 150.

After CHNS 150 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 152

Advanced Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Haiwen Wang, Peisong Xu
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM, 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Fall

The third level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate high to advanced low speaking and listening skills and with intermediate reading and writing skills. The goal of the course is to help students effectively expand their skills in reading and writing while concurrently addressing the need to improve their listening and oral skills in formal environments. The materials cover a variety of topics relating to Chinese culture, society and cultural differences, supplemented with authentic video materials.

After CHNS 142 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 153

Advanced Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Haiwen Wang, Peisong Xu
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate to advanced oral proficiency and high elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them. 

After CHNS 152 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 154

Advanced Modern Chinese III

Ninghui Liang, William Zhou
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Fourth level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Readings in a wide range of subjects form the basis of discussion and other activities. Students consolidate their skills, especially speaking proficiency, at an advanced level. Materials use both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 151 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 155

Upper Advanced Modern Chinese IV

Ninghui Liang, William Zhou
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM; 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 154.

After CHNS 154 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 162

Advanced Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers III

Wei Su
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills and with advanced low reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000–1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 153 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 163

Advanced Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers III

Wei Su
MWF 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Third level of the advanced learner sequence in Chinese. Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills (able to conduct conversations fluently) and with high intermediate reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000–1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 162 or equivalent

China

CHNS 164

Chinese for Reading Contemporary Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Selected readings in Chinese fiction of the 1980s and 1990s. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 165

Readings in Modern Chinese Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Reading and discussion of modern short stories, most written prior to 1949. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 166

Chinese for Current Affairs

William Zhou
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a strong focus on speaking and writing skills in formal style. Current affairs and issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as news and blogs on the Internet, television, film, fine arts and so on.

China

CHNS 167

Chinese for Current Affairs

William Zhou
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM; 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a strong focus on speaking and writing skills in formal style. Current affairs and issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as news and blogs on the Internet, television, film, fine arts and so on.

China

CHNS 169

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Min Chen
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 170

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Michael Hunter
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, CHNS 153, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 171

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM -12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 170.

After CHNS 170.

China

CHNS 172

Chinese for Scholarly Conversation

Yongtao Zhang
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

This course aims to bring students to advanced competence in all aspects of modern Chinese, and prepare students for advanced research or employment in a variety of China-related fields. Materials include readings on contemporary social, cultural, and political issues, which are written by prominent scholar writers in related fields. This level is suitable for students who have had four years of college Chinese prior to attending, or who have taken three years of an accelerated program meant for heritage speakers.

Prerequisite: CHNS 155, CHNS 162, placement results equivalent to L5, or permission of instructor.

China

CHNS 570

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Michael Hunter
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, 153, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 571

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM -12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 570.

After CHNS 570 or equivalent.

China

EALL 200, CHNS 200, EAST 240, HUMS 270

The Chinese Tradition

Tina Lu
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

An introduction to the literature, culture, and thought of premodern China, from the beginnings of the written record to the turn of the twentieth century. Close study of textual and visual primary sources, with attention to their historical and cultural backdrops.

Students enrolled in CHNS 200 join a weekly Mandarin-language discussion section. No knowledge of Chinese required for students enrolled in EALL 200. Students enrolled in CHNS 200 must have L5 proficiency in Mandarin or permission of the course instructor.

China

EALL 203, LITR 198

The Tale of Genji

Edward Kamens
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

A reading of the central work of prose fiction in the Japanese classical tradition in its entirety (in English translation) along with some examples of predecessors, parodies, and adaptations (the latter include Noh plays and twentieth-century short stories). Topics of discussion include narrative form, poetics, gendered authorship and readership, and the processes and premises that have given The Tale of Genji its place in “world literature.” Attention will also be given to the text’s special relationship to visual culture.

No knowledge of Japanese required. A previous college-level course in the study of literary texts is recommended but not required.

Japan

EALL 210, EAST 210, LITR 172

Man and Nature in Chinese Literature

Kang-I Chang
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

An exploration of man and nature in traditional Chinese literature, with special attention to aesthetic and cultural meanings. Topics include the concept of nature and literature; neo-Taoist self-cultivation; poetry and Zen (Chan) Buddhism; travel in literature; loss, lament, and self-reflection in song lyrics; nature and the supernatural in classical tales; love and allusions to nature; religious pilgrimage and allegory.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese.

China

EALL 211, EAST 241, LITR 174, WGSS 405

Women and Literature in Traditional China

Kang-I Chang
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

A study of major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. The power of women’s writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; footbinding; notions of love and death; the aesthetics of illness; women and revolution; poetry clubs; the function of memory in women’s literature; problems of gender and genre. 

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese.

China

EALL 212, PHIL 203

Ancient Chinese Thought

Michael Hunter
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

An introduction to the foundational works of ancient Chinese thought from the ruling ideologies of the earliest historical dynasties, through the Warring States masters, to the Qin and Han empires. Topics include Confucianism and Daoism, the role of the intellectual in ancient Chinese society, and the nature and performance of wisdom.

China

EALL 213, HUMS 292, PHIL 205, RLST 211

Philosophy, Religion, and Literature in Medieval China

Lucas Bender
HTBA
Spring

Exploration of the rich intellectual landscape of the Chinese middle ages, introducing students to seminal works of Chinese civilization and to the history of their debate and interpretation in the first millennium. No previous knowledge of China is assumed. Instead, the course serves as a focused introduction to Chinese philosophy, religion, and literature.

Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 214

Urban Space in Modern Japanese Literature

Timothy Unverzagt Goddard
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

This course examines representations of urban space in Japanese literature from the 1890s to the 1940s, a period spanning the Meiji (1868–1912), Taishō (1912–1926), and Shōwa (1926–1989) eras. The profound transformation of Japanese society during these years was marked by rapid modernization, urban development, mass media, and imperial conquest. We discuss the different ways in which writers experienced and imagined the modern city, attending closely to themes of subjectivity, gender, sexuality, fantasy, and the grotesque.

All readings are in English translation; no knowledge of Japanese is required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 230, EAST 242, HUMS 269

Poetry and Ethics Amidst Imperial Collapse

Lucas Bender
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Du Fu has for the last millennium been considered China’s greatest poet. Close study of nearly one-sixth of his complete works, contextualized by selections from the tradition that defined the art in his age. Exploration of the roles literature plays in interpreting human lives and the ways different traditional forms shape different ethical orientation. Poetry as a vehicle for moral reflection. 

All readings are in English. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 233, EAST 243, HSAR 417, HUMS 285

History of Chinese Imperial Parks and Private Gardens

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM -12:50 PM
Fall

Study of notable parks and private gardens of China, spanning from the 2nd century BCE to contemporary China. Themes include the history, politics, and economics surrounding construction of parks; garden designs and planning; cultural representations of the garden; and modern reinterpreted landscapes. Some sessions meet in the Yale University Art Gallery.

No previous knowledge of Chinese language is necessary. Students previously enrolled in EALL 050 may not take this course for credit. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 261

Japanese Literature of the Early Modern Period

Timothy Unverzagt Goddard
M,W 11:35 AM -12:50 PM
Spring

This course provides a panoramic view of Japanese literature of the early modern period (1600–1867). Readings explore the diverse genres that flourished during these years, including various forms of poetry, prose, and drama. We consider the different ways in which the transformation of Japanese society under the Tokugawa shogunate affected literary production, such as official censorship, the introduction of printing, the influence of Chinese learning and literati culture, and the vibrant urban milieus of Edo, Kyoto, and Osaka. We also refer to the two distinct genealogies of early modern Japanese literature, “popular” (zoku) and “refined” (ga), as a way of understanding this period in Japanese literary history.

All readings are in English translation; no knowledge of Japanese is required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 265, EAST 253, LITR 251

Japanese Literature after 1970

Timothy Unverzagt Goddard
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

This course provides a survey of Japanese literature from 1970 to the present. Readings include novels and essays from a diverse range of authors, addressing themes such as identity, language, memory, domesticity, postmodernism, and racial discrimination. Students develop extensive knowledge of contemporary Japanese literature, while also cultivating skills in close reading and research methods.

All readings are in English translation; no knowledge of Japanese is required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 268

The Literature of Japanese Empire

Timothy Unverzagt Goddard
Th 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Spanning a period from the 1910s to the 1940s, this course considers the effects of Japanese imperialism on the development of modern literature in East Asia. How did authors from mainland Japan represent the so-called outer territories of the empire? How did authors from colonial Taiwan and Korea navigate issues of language, identity, and culture in their writings? What significance did the semi-colonial city of Shanghai hold in the modern literary imagination? Readings include a broad range of primary sources, including novels, short stories, essays, poems, and travelogues. We also engage with selections from recent secondary sources to understand how scholars have approached this tumultuous era in East Asian literary history. 

Knowledge of Japanese, Chinese, and Korean is not required, though students with reading ability in any of these languages will have opportunities to practice them. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 271, FILM 448

Japanese Cinema after 1960

Aaron Gerow
M,W 6:00 PM - 7:15 PM
Fall

The development of Japanese cinema after the breakdown of the studio system, through the revival of the late 1990s, and to the present.

No knowledge of Japanese required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 280, EAST 260, FILM 307

East Asian Martial Arts Film

Aaron Gerow
T,Th 6:00 PM - 6:50 PM
Fall

The martial arts film has not only been a central genre for many East Asian cinemas, it has been the cinematic form that has most defined those cinemas for others. Domestically, martial arts films have served to promote the nation, while on the international arena, they have been one of the primary conduits of transnational cinematic interaction, as kung-fu or samurai films have influenced films inside and outside East Asia, from The Matrix to Kill Bill. Martial arts cinema has become a crucial means for thinking through such issues as nation, ethnicity, history, East vs. West, the body, gender, sexuality, stardom, industry, spirituality, philosophy, and mediality, from modernity to postmodernity. It is thus not surprising that martial arts films have also attracted some of the world’s best filmmakers, ranging from Kurosawa Akira to Wong Kar Wai. This course focuses on films from Japan, China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and South Korea—as well as on works from other countries influenced by them—covering such martial arts genres such as the samurai film, kung-fu, karate, wuxia, and related historical epics. It provides a historical survey of each nation and genre, while connecting them to other genres, countries, and media.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 302, EAST 341

Readings in Classical Chinese Prose

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Close reading of classical Chinese texts (wenyan) primarily from late Imperial China. A selection of formal and informal prose, including memoirs, sanwen essays, classical tales, biographies, and autobiographies. Focus on cultural and historical contexts, with attention to reception in China and in some cases in Korea and Japan. Questions concerning readership and governmental censorship, function of literature, history and fictionality, memory and writing, and the aesthetics of qing (emotion).

Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. Prerequisite: CHNS 171 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 319

The Vernacular Short Story in Early Modern China

Tina Lu
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Introduction to the literary genre huaben, or the vernacular short story. Seventeenth century texts, written in a version of spoken Chinese, provide an unparalleled view of life in early modern China. Discussions of book culture, commercial publication, and the social role of the vernacular.

Prerequisite: ability to read modern Chinese (L5). Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 325, EAST 345

Chinese Poetic Form, 1490-1990

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Development of the classical Chinese poetic form by modern Chinese poets. The appeal and aesthetic concept of the classical form since the revivalist movement of the late fifteenth century. Emphasis on close critical reading, with attention to cultural and political contexts.

Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. Prerequisite: a literary Chinese course or permission of instructor. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 351

Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese Literature

Jing Tsu
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

An introduction to literary criticism and history using texts in the original language. Fiction and nonfiction written in Chinese in different parts of the world, with a focus on the period from the nineteenth century to the present. Readings in Chinese; texts in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 163, 164, 165, or equivalent. Permission of instructor requried.

China

EALL 503

The Tale of Genji

Edward Kamens
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

A reading of the central work of prose fiction in the Japanese classical tradition in its entirety (in English translation) along with some examples of predecessors, parodies, and adaptations (the latter include Noh plays and twentieth-century short stories). Topics of discussion include narrative form, poetics, gendered authorship and readership, and the processes and premises that have given The Tale of Genji its place in world literature. Attention is also given to the text’s special relationship to visual culture.

No knowledge of Japanese required. A previous college-level course in the study of literary texts is recommended but not required.

Japan

EALL 510, EAST 540

Man and Nature in Chinese Literature

Kang-I Chang
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

An exploration of man and nature in traditional Chinese literature, with special attention to aesthetic and cultural meanings. Topics include the concept of nature and literature; Neo-Daoist self-cultivation; poetry and Zen (Chan) Buddhism; travel in literature; loss, lament, and self-reflection in song lyrics; nature and the supernatural in classical tales; love and allusions to nature; religious pilgrimage and allegory.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese.

China

EALL 511, EAST 541

Women and Literature in Traditional China

Kang-I Chang
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

This course focuses on major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. Topics include the power of women’s writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; the cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; foot binding and its implications; women’s notion of love and death; the aesthetic of illness; women and revolution; women’s poetry clubs; the function of memory in women’s literature; problems of gender and genre.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese.

China

EALL 512

Ancient Chinese Thought

Michael Hunter
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Spring

An introduction to the foundational works of ancient Chinese thought from the ruling ideologies of the earliest historical dynasties, through the Warring States masters, to the Qin and Han empires. Topics include Confucianism and Daoism, the role of the intellectual in ancient Chinese society, and the nature and performance of wisdom.

This is primarily an undergraduate course; graduate students are provided readings in the original language and meet in an additional session to review translations.

China

EALL 513

Philosophy, Religion, and Literature in Medieval China

Lucas Bender
HTBA
Spring

This course explores the rich intellectual landscape of the Chinese middle ages, introducing students to seminal works of Chinese civilization and to the history of their debate and interpretation in the first millennium.

No previous knowledge of China is assumed. This is primarily an undergraduate course; graduate students are provided readings in the original language and meet in an additional session to review translations.

China

EALL 530, EAST 542

Poetry and Ethics Amidst Imperial Collapse

Lucas Bender
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Du Fu has for the last millennium been considered China’s greatest poet. Close study of nearly one-sixth of his complete works, contextualized by selections from the tradition that defined the art in his age. Exploration of the roles literature plays in interpreting human lives and the ways different traditional forms shape different ethical orientation. Poetry as a vehicle for moral reflection. 

All readings are in English.

China

EALL 565, EAST 553

Japanese Literature after 1970

Timothy Unverzagt Goddard
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Study of Japanese literature published between 1970 and the present. Writers may include Murakami Ryu, Maruya Saiichi, Shimada Masahiko, Nakagami Kenji, Yoshimoto Banana, Yamada Eimi, Murakami Haruki, and Medoruma Shun.

No knowledge of Japanese required.

Japan

EALL 568

The Literature of Japanese Empire

Timothy Unverzagt Goddard
Th 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Spanning a period from the 1910s to the 1940s, this course considers the effects of Japanese imperialism on the development of modern literature in East Asia. How did authors from mainland Japan represent the so-called outer territories of the empire? How did authors from colonial Taiwan and Korea navigate issues of language, identity, and culture in their writings? What significance did the semi-colonial city of Shanghai hold in the modern literary imagination? Readings include a broad range of primary sources, including novels, short stories, essays, poems, and travelogues. We also engage with selections from recent secondary sources to understand how scholars have approached this tumultuous era in East Asian literary history. 

Graduate students are expected to conduct research in any and all East Asian languages relevant to their topic and in which they are proficient.

Japan

EALL 571, FILM 882

Japanese Cinema after 1960

Aaron Gerow
M,W 6:00 PM - 7:15 PM
Fall

The development of Japanese cinema after the breakdown of the studio system, through the revival of the late 1990s, to the present.

Japan

EALL 602, EAST 641

Readings in Classical Chinese Prose

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Close reading of classical Chinese texts (wenyan) primarily from late Imperial China. A selection of formal and informal prose, including memoirs, sanwen essays, classical tales, biographies, and autobiographies. Focus on cultural and historical contexts, with attention to reception in China and in some cases in Korea and Japan. Questions concerning readership and governmental censorship, function of literature, history and fictionality, memory and writing, and the aesthetics of qing (emotion).

Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. Prerequisite: CHNS 171 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

China

EALL 619

The Vernacular Short Story in Early Modern China (Huaben)

Tina Lu
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

This course introduces students to the genre often called huaben, or the vernacular short story. These stories are written in a version of spoken Chinese, and for texts dating from the 17th century are quite easy to read, while providing an unparalleled window onto everyday life. We will be reading a wide range of these stories, in significant volume, and the class will culminate in the student’s writing a final paper.

China

EALL 625, EAST 545

Chinese Poetic Form, 1490-1990

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

What is the appeal and the aesthetic concept of the Classical Chinese poetic form, which began in classical antiquity and continued to serve as a primary medium for poetic expression in modern times? How did modern writers express their “new” voices by using this “old” form? The seminar traces the “modern” development of Chinese classical poetry from the Revivalist (fugu) movement of the Ming to contemporary China in Shanghai. Emphasis on critical close reading, with attention to cultural and political contexts. Baihua translations and notes are provided for most of the poems.

Primary readings in Chinese, discussion in English.

China

EALL 651

Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese Literature

Jing Tsu
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

A rigorous introduction to literary criticism and analysis using texts in the original language. Focus on the contemporary period, drawing from fiction written in Chinese in different parts of the world, from mainland China to Taiwan and from Malaysia to Hong Kong. Texts in both simplified and traditional characters. 

China

EALL 715

Readings in Modern Japanese Literature

Timothy Unverzagt Goddard
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

Readings from a selection of representative texts from modern to contemporary Japanese literature with a focus on comprehension, translation, critical reception, and close reading. Students have the opportunity to select a few texts of interest in consultation with the instructor.

Japan

EALL 823, CPLT 953

Topics in Sinophone and Chinese Studies

Jing Tsu
M 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Fall

This seminar examines the current state of the field of Chinese and Sinophone studies from different geographical and theoretical perspectives. It is a research seminar and colloquium, and we use texts in the original as well as translated languages. Topics vary.

China

EALL 872, FILM 880, JAPN 872

Theories of Subculture and Popular Culture in Japan

Aaron Gerow
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Exploration of postwar theories of popular culture and subculture in Japan, particularly focusing on the intellectual debates over television and new media.

Japan

EAST 409, EVST 408, HIST 329J

The Environmental History of East Asia

Mark Frank
HTBA
Spring

This course introduces students to the rapidly growing field of East Asian environmental history. Our scope is the interactions of human beings with their environments in China and Japan from antiquity to the present. Most of our class time is devoted to open-ended discussions of readings that are grouped by topic. Most of our readings are of recently published research that challenge earlier understandings of Chinese and Japanese history. Prior knowledge of East Asian history or environmental history is welcome but is not a requirement. The schedule is organized into three units that cover specific themes within East Asian environmental history: (I) The Nature of the State, (II) Plants and Waters, and (III) Human-Animal Relations. 

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 491

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 492

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 501, HIST 867

Modern Korean History Studies: Issues and Methods

Ria Chae
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

This course examines major works in Korean history of the twentieth century, encompassing the colonial period and the Korean War, the First Republic, economic development, and democratization of South Korea, as well as the building of the North Korean state under Kim Il Sung. Within each of the six topics, a seminal work is paired with an enthusiastically received recent study investigating the same question or time period. By critically analyzing and comparing the issues illuminated and methods employed by these studies, the course seeks to discuss the transformations and continuity of perspectives and methodology in the study of modern Korean history.

Korea

EAST 502, HIST 890

History of North Korea: Politics, Society, and Culture

Ria Chae
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

This course explores the political, social, and cultural history of North Korea from the origins of the state during the Japanese colonial period to the regime transition in the early twenty-first century. The particular focus is on the factors driving the transformations of North Korea. Nicknamed “the hermit kingdom,” the regime is often commonly perceived as isolated from the outside world. This course seeks to evaluate the importance of external influence and international context at the turning points in North Korean history, which include the establishment of DPRK, its militarization and beginning of nuclear development, Kim Il Sung’s purge of factions and the succession to Kim Jong Il and Kim Jong Un, and other topics. Discussions also analyze the accompanying changes in North Korean society and art. In addition to academic sources, the course utilizes artworks, films, music, historical newspapers, and memoirs. Through the critical examination of the evolution of North Korea, this course situates the country in the region as well as among other authoritarian and communist states.

Korea

EAST 503, MUSI 589, RLST 636

Popular Music and Christianity in Korea

Bo kyung Blenda Im
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

How do Korean popular musicians who identify as Christian position themselves in relation to the sonic worlds they inhabit? In what ways do their stylistic choices signal belonging to and/or disavowal of various social formations in the transpacific cultural imaginary? In this interdisciplinary graduate seminar, we interrogate the relationship between Christianity, popular music, and race through examination of case studies drawn primarily from early twenty-first-century Korea. Musical repertoires are analyzed within a framework that highlights transnational U.S.-Korean routes of religious and musical circulation. First, we address key theoretical and thematic foundations for the course. We then listen closely to important strands in Korean “church music,” including Western classical singing, contemporary worship, and gospel. Finally, we focus on connections between Christianity and R&B/soul, ballad, hip-hop, and “K-pop”—genres traditionally defined as “secular.” This survey of Korean popular music provides students the opportunity to consider the roles that “sacred” and “secular” constructs, race and ethnicity, imperialism, commerce, and aesthetics play in power-inflected processes of cultural globalization.

Yale College juniors and seniors are welcome.

Korea

EAST 543

History of Chinese Imperial Parks and Private Gardens

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM -12:50 PM
Fall

Study of notable parks and private gardens of China, spanning from the second century BCE to contemporary China. Themes include the history, politics, and economics surrounding construction of parks; garden designs and planning; cultural representations of the garden; and modern reinterpreted landscapes. Some sessions meet in the Yale University Art Gallery. 

No previous knowledge of Chinese language is necessary.

China

EAST 900

Master's Thesis

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 900

Master’s Thesis

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 910

Independent Study

By arrangement with faculty and with approval of the DGS.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 910

Independent Study

By arrangement with faculty and with approval of the DGS.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

GLBL 318, EAST 338, ECON 338

Inside the Next China

Stephen Roach
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

The transitional imperatives of the Next China take on new meaning in a post-pandemic, conflict-prone climate. This seminar offers a deep dive into this transition, with special emphasis on China’s AI-enabled push to indigenous innovation. Focus is also directed at reforms of debt-intensive state-owned enterprises as well as the development of a modern financial system and a fully-convertible currency. A rethinking of China’s relationship challenges, especially with the United States, is an over-arching theme of the seminar.

Prerequisite: introductory macroeconomics. Permission of instructor required.

China

GLBL 376

Asia Now: Human Rights, Globalization, Cultural Conflicts

Jing Tsu
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

This course examines contemporary and global issues in Asia (east, southeast, northeast, south), in a historical and interdisciplinary context, that include international law, policy debates, cultural issues, security, military history, media, science and technology, and cyber warfare. Course is co-taught with a guest professor. 

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia

GLBL 552

Asia Now: Human Rights, Globalization, Cultural Conflicts

Jing Tsu
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

This course examines contemporary and global issues in Asia (east, southeast, northeast, south), in a historical and interdisciplinary context that includes international law, policy debates, cultural issues, security, military history, media, science and technology, and cyber warfare.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

GLBL 616

China’s Rise and the Future of Foreign Policy

David Rank
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

China’s return to its traditional role as a regional—and, increasingly, global—power has implications for the political, security, and economic structures that have been the foundation of the international system since the end of the Second World War. This course looks at the impact China’s ascent has had, the challenges a rising China will pose for policy makers in the years ahead, and the internal issues China will need to address in the years ahead. It does so from the perspective of a practitioner who spent nearly three decades working on U.S. foreign policy and U.S.-China relations.

China

GLBL 618, MGT 911

Inside the Next China

Stephen Roach
W 3.30-5.20
Fall

Born out of necessity in the post-Cultural Revolution chaos of the late 1970s, modern China is about reforms, opening up, and transition. The Next China will be driven by the transition from an export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. China’s new model could unmask a dual identity crisis—underscored by China’s need to embrace political reform and the West’s long-standing misperceptions about China. 

Prerequisite: basic undergraduate macroeconomics.

China

HIST 030, EAST 030

Tokyo

Daniel Botsman
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Four centuries of Japan’s history explored through the many incarnations, destructions, and rebirths of its foremost city. Focus on the solutions found by Tokyo’s residents to the material and social challenges of concentrating such a large population in one place. Tensions between continuity and impermanence, authenticity and modernity, and social order and the culture of play.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

HIST 303

Japan's Modern Revolution

Daniel Botsman
T,Th 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

A survey of Japan’s transformation over the course of the nineteenth century from an isolated, traditional society on the edge of northeast Asia to a modern imperial power. Aspects of political, social, and cultural history.

Japan

HIST 303J, EAST 303

Hong Kong and China: A Cross-Border History

Denise Ho
W 7:00 PM - 8:50 PM or Th 7:00 PM - 8:50 PM
Fall

This departmental seminar studies the historical development of Hong Kong and China in relation to each other, from the colonial and late imperial experience to their shared histories in national and political movements, from postwar industrialization to reform-era economic growth, culminating in the 1997 handover and its attendant political and economic integration. The readings from the first half of the semester come primarily from the literature in history, while the readings in the second half draw from anthropology, economics, political science, and sociology. Each week readings include primary sources in or translated into English.

Permission of instructor required.

China

HIST 304J

Japanese Historical Documents

Daniel Botsman
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Few pre-industrial societies anywhere in the world have bequeathed us a body of historical documents as varied and plentiful as those Tokugawa Japan (1600-1867). This class offers students who already have a solid command of modern Japanese an introduction to these remarkable sources, focusing particularly on what they can teach us about life in the great cities of Edo (now Tokyo), Osaka, and Kyoto—three of the largest urban centers anywhere in the pre-industrial world.

Prerequisite: JAPN 140 or equivalent. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

HIST 321, EAST 220

China from Present to Past, 2015-600

Valerie Hansen
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Underlying causes of current issues facing China traced back to their origins in the premodern period. Topics include economic development, corruption, environmental crises, gender, and Pacific island disputes. Selected primary-source readings in English, images, videos, and Web resources.

Optional additional Chinese-language and English-language sections.

China

HIST 871, EAST 571

The History of the People’s Republic of China

Denise Ho
Th 7:00 PM - 8:50 PM
Spring

This is a reading seminar that examines recent English-language scholarship on the People’s Republic of China, focusing on the Mao period (1949–76). Considering the question of the PRC as history, the seminar compares present-day scholarship to earlier social science research and discusses the questions being asked and answered by historians today.

Reading knowledge of Chinese is not required; open to undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

China

HIST 878

Readings in Japanese History to 1850

Fabian Drixler
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A critical introduction to debates in the history of Japan up to about 1850, with particular emphasis on the Tokugawa and Meiji periods but some coverage of earlier times as well. 

Readings are in English but, depending on student interest, supplemental materials may also be assigned in Japanese.

Japan

HIST 881

China’s Age of Discovery

Valerie Hansen
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Study of China’s maritime history focusing on the period 1000–1500, culminating with the Zheng He voyages and their cancellation.

English-language readings in secondary sources and primary sources in translation; examination of relevant maps in Beinecke’s collection. Separate section for those with a reading knowledge of classical Chinese.

China

HIST 889, EAST 889

Research in Japanese History

Daniel Botsman
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

After a general introduction to the broad array of sources and reference materials available for conducting research related to the history of Japan since ca. 1600, students prepare original research papers on topics of their own choosing in a collaborative workshop environment.

Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Japanese.

Japan

HSAR 119, EAST 119

Introduction to the History of Art: Asian Art and Culture

Quincy Ngan
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

This introductory course explores the art of India, China, Japan, and Korea from prehistory to the present. We consider major works and monuments from all four regions. Themes include the representation of nature and the body, the intersection of art with spirituality and politics, and everything from elite to consumer culture. All students welcome, including those who have no previous experience with either art history or the study of Asian art. This class makes frequent visits to Yale University Art Gallery.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

HSAR 144

Arts of the Silk Road

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Spring

Introduction to the art history of the Silk Road regions, 200 BCE – 1200 CE, with emphasis on the intersection of local and global in visual practices from Kashgar to Nara and beyond. Emphasis on examples of Buddhist, Manichaean, Zoroastrian, Christian, and Islamic art in the context of transaction and exchange along the Silk Road network.

China, Japan, Transregional

HSAR 305, EAST 305

Time in Chinese Art

Quincy Ngan
T,Th 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

This class explores the theme of “time” in Chinese art from the traditional to the contemporary period. Drawing upon scholarship on Chinese philosophical understanding of time and clockworks, this course explores how art made manifest notions of the future, past, and present, the passage of time, ksana, aeons, eternity and deadlines. This class also investigates manipulations of time—how the unique format, artistic ideas and medium and materials of Chinese art helped to pause, rewind, compress and shorten time. Observing such temporalities, we analyze narrative murals and handscrolls, “this life” v. afterlife in funeral art, paintings of immortality, the significance of bronze corrosion in antiquarianism, uses of the past in traditional Chinese painting and contemporary art, the future and agelessness in movies and digital art, the materiality and nostalgia of old photography and time-based artworks, as well as the history of People’s Republic of China as presented at the Tian’anmen Square.

China

HSAR 484, EAST 474

Japanese Screens

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
F 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

The screen-painting tradition in Japan, particularly as it emerged in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The format, techniques, and functions of screen painting; poetic and literary connections, as well as studio practices and politics, of the principal lineages of painters; aesthetics and styles associated with varying classes of patronage, from the shoguns to Buddhist monks to the Japanese court.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

HSAR 486, EAST 486

Gender and Sexuality in Asian Art

Quincy Ngan
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

This class uses art to investigate the stereotypes of, and expectations for, gender in China, Japan, and Korea, spanning from the modern to the contemporary. It explores relationships between masculinity, femininity, homosexuality, and androgyny, as well as the politics and economy of these identities in East Asia. Together, we analyze how artworks—painting, performance, manga, movies, fashion, illustration, and sculpture—have made manifest genders and helped to enact, modify, and conceal one’s sexuality. It also probes how representations of social spaces and leisure activities reinforce or complicate gender stereotypes and expectations. This class is divided into four parts. The first explores methodological frameworks and theories for parsing gender and sexuality in East Asia. The second focuses on masculinity, studying the representations, burdens and desires of heroes, leaders, and male celebrities. The third focuses on femininity, exploring the production and consumption of images of beautiful women, along with the economy and politics of being attractive and seductive in East Asia. While the second and third parts examine the conventional dichotomy of the two sexes, the fourth balances this account by focusing on the imageries of homosexuality and transgender. 

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

JAPN 110

Elementary Japanese I

Kumiko Nakamura, Mari Stever, Mika Yamaguchi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM, 3:30 PM - 4:20 PM, 4:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Introductory language course for students with no previous background in Japanese. Development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, including 50 hiragana, 50 katakana, and 75 kanji characters. Introduction to cultural aspects such as levels of politeness and group concepts. In-class drills in pronunciation and conversation. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 120

Elementary Japanese II

Kumiko Nakamura, Mari Stever, Mika Yamaguchi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 110, with supplementary materials such as excerpts from television shows, anime, and songs. Introduction of 150 additional kanji.

After JAPN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 130

Intermediate Japanese I

Hiroyo Nishimura
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM, 4:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Continued development in both written and spoken Japanese. Aspects of Japanese culture, such as history, art, religion, and cuisine, explored through text, film, and animation. Online audio and visual aids facilitate listening, as well as the learning of grammar and kanji. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 140

Intermediate Japanese II

Hiroyo Nishimura
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 130.

After JAPN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 150

Advanced Japanese I

Mari Stever
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Advanced language course that further develops proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Reading and discussion materials include works by Nobel Prize winners. Japanese anime and television dramas are used to enhance listening and to develop skills in culturally appropriate speech. Writing of essays, letters, and criticism solidifies grammar and style. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 140 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 151

Advanced Japanese II

Mari Stever
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 150.

After JAPN 150 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 156

Advanced Japanese III

Kumiko Nakamura
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

Close reading of modern Japanese writing on current affairs, social science, history, and literature. Development of speaking and writing skills in academic settings, including formal speeches, interviews, discussions, letters, e-mail, and expository writing. Interviews of and discussions with native speakers on current issues. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 157

Advanced Japanese IV

Kumiko Nakamura
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 156.

After JAPN 156 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 170

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Edward Kamens
T,Th 7:30 PM - 8:45 PM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 570

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Edward Kamens
T,Th 7:30 PM - 8:45 PM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

KREN 110

Elementary Korean I

Angela Lee-Smith, Hyun Sung Lim
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

A beginning course in modern Korean. Pronunciation, lectures on grammar, conversation practice, and introduction to the writing system (Hankul).

This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 120

Elementary Korean II

Seungja Choi, Hyun Sung Lim
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 110.

After KREN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 130

Intermediate Korean I

Seungja Choi, Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Continued development of skills in modern Korean, spoken and written, leading to intermediate-level proficiency.

After KREN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 132

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners I

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Intended for students with some oral proficiency but little or no training in Hankul. Focus on grammatical analysis, the standard spoken language, and intensive training in reading and writing.

This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 140

Intermediate Korean II

Hyun Sung Lim
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 130.

After KREN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 142

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 132.

After KREN 132 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 150

Advanced Korean I: Korean Language and Culture through K-Pop Music

Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

An advanced language course with emphasis on developing vocabulary and grammar, practice reading comprehension, speaking on a variety of topics, and writing in both formal and informal styles. Use storytelling, discussion, peer group activities, audio and written journals, oral presentations, and supplemental audiovisual materials and texts in class. Intended for nonheritage speakers.

After KREN 140 or equivalent

Korea

KREN 151

Advanced Korean II: Language and Culture through Media

Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

This course is content and project-based to further develop integrated language skills-spoken and written, including grammar and vocabulary, as well as intercultural competence through Korean media. Through a variety of media, such as print media, publishing, digital media, cinema, broadcasting (radio, television, podcasting), and advertising, students explore and reflect on a wide range of topics and perspectives in Korean culture and society. The course learning activities include interactive, interpretive, and presentational communication; critical analysis; creative and authentic language applications in formal/informal contexts. 

After KREN 150 or equivalent.

Korea

KREN 152

Advanced Korean for Advanced Learners

Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An advanced course in modern Korean. Reading of short stories, essays, and journal articles, and introduction of 200 Chinese characters. Students develop their speaking and writing skills through discussions and written exercises.

After KREN 142 or 151, or with permission of instructor.

Korea

KREN 154

Advanced Korean III

Seungja Choi
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

An advanced language course designed to develop reading and writing skills using Web-based texts in a variety of genres. Students read texts independently and complete comprehension and vocabulary exercises through the Web. Discussions, tests, and intensive writing training in class.

After KREN 152 or equivalent.

Korea

LAW 21179, GLBL 624

Contemporary China Research Seminar

Research and writing on contemporary problems related to China, including but not limited to legal issues. The class meets roughly six times during the term to discuss particular China-related issues (occasionally with a guest) and at the end of the term for student presentations of their research. The remainder of the term, students work on their research and writing projects and individually meet with the instructors to discuss their work. 

Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. Permission of the instructors required. Prerequisite (non-Law students): in addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a statement of interest explaining their background related to China and research ideas they are considering no later than 4:30 p.m. on October 29, 2019. Decisions on admission to the class will be made primarily on the basis of the statements.

China

LAW 21361

Chinese Law and Society

Taisu Zhang
M 10:10 AM - 12:00 PM
Spring

This course will survey law and legal practice in the People’s Republic of China. Particular attention is given to the interaction of legal institutions with politics, social change, and economic development. Specific topics include, among others, the Party State, the nature of political legitimacy in contemporary Chinese society, state capitalism, the judiciary, property law and development, business and investment law, criminal law and procedure, media (especially the Internet), and major schools of Chinese legal and political thought.

Prior familiarity with Chinese history or politics is unnecessary but helpful. All course materials will be in English. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen.

China

MUSI 145

Music in Japan

Liam Hynes-Tawa
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Like Japanese culture in general, Japan’s music has been stereotyped both as very old/traditional and very modern/Western, a dichotomy that fails to take into account the many rich layers of history that have combined to create the landscape we see today. This course walks through several different genres and periods in the history of Japanese music, allowing students to become more deeply familiar with types of music that they may have heard before, and to get to know new repertories that may be more unfamiliar. In order to proceed from the more to the less known, the course moves in backward chronological order, beginning with recent music that most of us have heard somewhere, like popular anime and video game soundtracks. From there we move deeper back into the twentieth century, examining the postwar genres that gave rise to more familiar recent ones, and from there to the songs that accompanied Japan’s turn to colonial empire in the late nineteenth and earlier twentieth centuries. Finally, we end by learning what we can about the music that predates sound recording and Western influences.

Sophomore Seminar: Registration preference given to sophomores. Not normally open to first-year students. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

PLSC 162

Japan and the World

The historical development of Japan’s international relations since the late Tokugawa period; World War II and its legacy; domestic institutions and foreign policy; implications for the United States; and interactions between nationalism and regionalism.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

PLSC 357, EAST 310, GLBL 309

The Rise of China

Daniel Mattingly
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Analysis of contemporary Chinese politics, with focus on how the country has become a major power and how the regime has endured. Topics include China’s recent history, state, ruling party, economy, censorship, elite politics, and foreign policy.

China

PLSC 444, EAST 344

Governing China

Daniel Mattingly
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

Study of the politics of contemporary China, with a focus on recent research. Topics include elite politics, technology, economic growth, trade, repression, propaganda, protest, the military, and foreign policy.

Permission of instructor required.

China

PLSC 678

Japan and the World

The historical development of Japan’s international relations since the late Tokugawa period; World War II and its legacy; domestic institutions and foreign policy; implications for the United States; and interactions between nationalism and regionalism.

Japan

PLSC 793

Governing China

Daniel Mattingly
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Study of the politics of contemporary China with a focus on recent research. Topics include authoritarianism, representation, local governance, elite politics, censorship, propaganda, protest, and the rule of law.

China

REL 917H

East Asian Religions and Ecology

John Grim, Mary Evelyn Tucker
T 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Spring

This hybrid online course introduces the East Asian religious traditions of Confucianism, Daoism, and East Asian Buddhism in relation to the emerging field of religion and ecology. This overview course identifies developments in the traditions that highlight their ecological implications in the contemporary period. In particular, it relates religious concepts, textual analysis, ritual activities, and institutional formations to engaged, on-the-ground environmental projects. It investigates the symbolic and lived expressions in religious ethics and practices that can be defined as religious ecologies. Similarly, it identifies narratives in Confucianism, Daoism, and East Asian Buddhism that orient humans to the cosmos, namely, religious cosmologies. This interrelationship of narratives and religious environmentalism provides pathways into the study of religion and ecology. 

The course meets from March 8th to April 26th.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

REL 940

The Chinese Theologians

Chloe Starr
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

This course examines select readings from Chinese church and academic theologians (including Hong Kong writers and diaspora voices) to explore the nature of Chinese Christian thought. The readings cover late imperial Roman Catholic writers, early republican Protestant thinkers, high communist-era church theologians, and contemporary Sino-Christian academic theologians. Students read primary materials in English, supplemented by background studies and lecture material to help make sense of the theological constructions that emerge. The course encourages reflection on the challenges for Christian mission in a communist context, on the tensions between church and state in the production of theologies, and on the challenges that Chinese Christianity poses for global Christian thought.

China

REL 983

China Mission

Chloe Starr
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

The Day Missions Collection at YDS is the strongest mission collection in the world, comprising about one third of the Divinity Library’s 500,000 volumes—and it is also the central repository in the United States for China-related mission papers. This course offers students the opportunity to complete an original research project in the library relating to mission in China, utilizing manuscript, microform, and monograph materials from the collections. For the first six weeks, students read intensively in mission history, theory, and practice, schematized through mission narratives. The next four weeks are “library lab” time: supervised reading time in special collection and archive materials within the library; reading into and developing projects while help is on hand for deciphering handwriting; providing reference tools for China, etc. The final two weeks are dedicated to research presentations and evaluation, with each student offering research findings to the class in any media chosen.

China

RLST 175, EAST 431

North Korea and Religion

Hwansoo Kim
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Ever since the establishment of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) in 1948 and the Korean War (1950–1953), North Korea has been depicted by the media as a reclusive, oppressive, and military country, its leaders as the worst dictators, and its people as brainwashed, tortured, and starving to death. The still ongoing Cold War discourse, intensified by the North Korea’s recent secret nuclear weapons program, furthers these negative images, and outsiders have passively internalized these images. However, these simplistic characterizations prevent one from gaining a balanced understanding of and insight into North Korea and its people on the ground. Topics other than political, military, and security issues are rarely given attention. On the whole, even though North Korea’s land area is larger than South Korea and its population of 25 million accounts for a third of all Koreans, North Korea has been neglected in the scholarly discussion of Korean culture. This class tries to make sense of North Korea in a more comprehensive way by integrating the political and economic with social, cultural, and religious dimensions. In order to accomplish this objective, students examine leadership, religious (especially cultic) aspects of the North Korean Juche ideology, the daily lives of its citizens, religious traditions, the Korean War, nuclear development and missiles, North Korean defectors and refugees, human rights, Christian missionary organizations, and unification, among others. Throughout, the course places North Korean issues in the East Asian and global context. The course draws upon recent scholarly books, articles, journals, interviews with North Korean defectors, travelogues, media publications, and visual materials.

Permission of instructor required.

Korea

RLST 564

The Study of Chinese Buddhism: Methods, History, and Perspectives

Eric Greene
HTBA
Spring

This seminar provides an intensive introduction to the study of Chinese Buddhism in the Western academy. We read and discuss a variety of classic and contemporary English-language books and articles on the study of Chinese Buddhism. Our aim is both to gain a broad knowledge of the history and development of Chinese Buddhism (with a focus on the period through 1000 C.E.), and to critically evaluate how the most prominent scholars in the field of the past fifty years have approached this topic.

China

SOCY 145, EAST 380

Inequality and Social Change in China

Emma Zang
T,Th 3:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Fall

This course offers an introduction to major social and economic issues in contemporary China. It provides a survey of the ongoing reforms and the Chinese society in transition with a focus on selected policy issues. In most weeks, the first session is reserved for a lecture by the instructor or a guest lecturer, and the second session is reserved for student-led discussions of pre-circulated questions.

China