CEAS Courses 2020-2021

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ANTH 213, EAST 313

Postwar Japan: Ghosts of Modernity

Yukiko Koga
HTBA
Fall

This course introduces students to contemporary Japan, examining how its defeat in the Second World War and loss of empire in 1945 continue to shape Japanese culture and society. Looking especially at the sphere of cultural production, it focuses on the question of what it means to be modern as expressed through the tension between resurgent neo-nationalism and the aspiration to internationalize. The course charts how the legacy of Japan’s imperial failure plays a significant role in its search for renewal and identity since 1945. How, it asks, does the experience of catastrophic failure—and failure to account for that failure—play into continued aspirations for modernity today? How does Japanese society wrestle with modernity’s two faces: its promise for progress and its history of catastrophic violence? The course follows the trajectory of Japan’s postwar nation-state development after the dissolution of empire, from its resurrection from the ashes after defeat, to its identity as a US ally and economic superpower during the Cold War, to decades of recession since the 1990s and the search for new relations with its neighbors and new reckonings with its own imperial violence and postwar inactions against the background of rising neonationalism.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

ANTH 342

Cultures and Markets in Asia

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Historical and contemporary movements of people, goods, and cultural meanings that have defined Asia as a region. Reexamination of state-centered conceptualizations of Asia and of established boundaries in regional studies. The intersections of transregional institutions and local societies and their effects on trading empires, religious traditions, colonial encounters, and cultural fusion. Finance flows that connect East Asia and the Indian Ocean to the Middle East and Africa. The cultures of capital and market in the neoliberal and postsocialist world.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

ANTH 355, AFST 355, EAST 351

China-Africa Encounters

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

The history, effects, and implications of Chinese involvement in and with African countries over the past century. Diasporic experiences, with attention to informal economies, cultural strategies, and ethnic and religious tensions; land, finance, and infrastructure; Chinese aid and development in Africa since the late 1960s, including medical aid and charitable groups.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional

ANTH 362

Unity and Diversity in Chinese Culture

Helen Siu
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

An exploration of the Chinese identity as it has been reworked over the centuries. Major works in Chinese anthropology and their intellectual connections with general anthropology and historical studies. Topics include kinship and marriage, marketing systems, rituals and popular religion, ethnicity and state making, and the cultural nexus of power.

Permission of instructor required.

China

ANTH 415

Culture, History, Power, and Representation

Helen Siu
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A critical introduction to anthropological formulations of the junctures of meaning, interest, and power. Readings include classical and contemporary ethnographies that are theoretically informed and historically situated.

This course meets during reading period. Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional

ARCH 341, GLBL 253, LAST 318, URBN 341

Globalization Space

Keller Easterling
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Infrastructure space as a primary medium of change in global polity. Networks of trade, energy, communication, transportation, spatial products, finance, management, and labor, as well as new strains of political opportunity that reside within their spatial disposition. Case studies include free zones and automated ports around the world, satellite urbanism in South Asia, high-speed rail in Japan and the Middle East, agripoles in southern Spain, fiber optic submarine cable in East Africa, spatial products of tourism in North Korea, and management platforms of the International Organization for Standardization.

Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

CHNS 110

Elementary Modern Chinese I

Rongzhen Li, Yu-Lin Wang Saussy, Jianhua Shen, Yongtao Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Intended for students with no background in Chinese. An intensive course with emphasis on spoken language and drills. Pronunciation, grammatical analysis, conversation practice, and introduction to reading and writing Chinese characters.

This course meets during reading period.

China

ENGL 369, AMST 374, EAST 369

American Empire in Asia and the Pacific

Sunny Xiang
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

This seminar explores the diverse cultural manifestations of war, empire, and militarism in Asia and the Pacific during the long Cold War (roughly the 1940s-1980s). A portion of the course is devoted to iconic literary and cultural figures who came to prominence through cultures of militarism (e.g., Jade Snow Wong, James Michener, C.Y. Lee, Richard Mason, Epeli Hauʻofa). We consider important genres privileged by cultural imperialism and soft power (e.g., autobiography, travel writing). We also read more faddish and less canonical writers (e.g., Kim Yong Ik, Induk Pahk, Janice Mirikitani, Maria Yen) and engage stranger and more ephemeral cultural objects (e.g., advertisements, fashion magazines, tourist guidebooks). Important topics for the course include refugee migration, the model minority, global education reform, and the belated resurgence of reparation movements. We conclude the semester by examining the Asian American Movement of the 1960s and the publication of Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior in 1975. 

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional