CEAS Courses 2022-2023

This list is subject to modification.

Some of the information contained here may have changed since the time of publication. Always check with the department under which the course is listed or on Yale University Course Search to make sure that the courses you are interested in are still being offered and that the times have not changed.

If you have questions about any of the courses listed here, please contact the offering department directly.

AMST 298, EAST 398, ER&M 288

Remembering the Korean War

Madeleine Han
MW 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

The Korean War, though often narrated as a “forgotten war” and a “police action,” marks a crucial period in the US imperial expansion into Asia. This course proceeds from the recognition that the Korean War remains ongoing, and asks how to “remember” the violent and unresolved legacies of the “hot” wars that have constituted the cold war in Asia. How have the Korean War and its legacies shaped the relationship between militarism and empire? How has warfare conditioned the movements and lives of the Korean diaspora? And how might the work of Korean and Asian American activists and cultural workers help us move toward a decolonial genealogy of the transpacific? While we consider problems of mainstream US historiography in narrating the Korean war, this interdisciplinary course takes a cultural studies approach in attending to the racialized and gendered legacies of a war that continues to condition the present. Themes include: overlapping US and Japanese imperialisms; Cold War nationalisms; cultures of militarism and warfare; tourism; race, gender, and labor; Asian American and Asian studies; migration and immigration; and diasporic memory.

No knowledge of Korean is required. Permission of instructor required.

Korea

ANTH 213, EAST 313

Contemporary Japan and the Ghosts of Modernity

Yukiko Koga
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

This course introduces students to contemporary Japan, examining how its defeat in the Second World War and loss of empire in 1945 continue to shape Japanese culture and society. Looking especially at the sphere of cultural production, it focuses on the question of what it means to be modern as expressed through the tension between resurgent neonationalism and the aspiration to internationalize. The course charts how the legacy of Japan’s imperial failure plays a significant role in its search for renewal and identity since 1945. How, it asks, does the experience of catastrophic failure—and failure to account for that failure—play into continued aspirations for modernity today? How does Japanese society wrestle with modernity’s two faces: its promise for progress and its history of catastrophic violence? The course follows the trajectory of Japan’s postwar nation-state development after the dissolution of empire, from its resurrection out of the ashes after defeat, to its identity as a US ally and economic superpower during the Cold War, to decades of recession since the 1990s and the search for new relations with its neighbors and new reckonings with its own imperial violence and postwar inactions against the background of rising neonationalism.

Japan

ANTH 362

Unity and Diversity in Chinese Culture

Helen Siu
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

An exploration of the Chinese identity as it has been reworked over the centuries. Major works in Chinese anthropology and their intellectual connections with general anthropology and historical studies. Topics include kinship and marriage, marketing systems, rituals and popular religion, ethnicity and state making, and the cultural nexus of power.

Permission of instructor required.

China

ANTH 414, EAST 417

Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations; class, gender, ethnicity, and migration; and global landscapes of power and citizenship.

Permission of instructor required. This course meets during reading period.

China, Transregional

ANTH 415

Culture, History, Power, and Representation

Anne Aronsson
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This seminar critically explores how anthropologists use contemporary social theories to formulate the junctures of meaning, interest, and power. It thus aims to integrate symbolic, economic, and political perspectives on culture and social process. If culture refers to the understandings and meanings by which people live, then it constitutes the conventions of social life that are themselves produced in the flux of social life, invented by human activity. Theories of culture must therefore illuminate this problematic of agency and structure. They must show how social action can both reproduce and transform the structures of meaning, the conventions of social life. Even as such a position becomes orthodox in anthropology, it raises serious questions about the possibilities for ethnographic practice and theoretical analysis. How, for example, are such conventions generated and transformed where there are wide differentials of power and unequal access to resources? What becomes of our notions of humans as active agents of culture when the possibilities for maneuver and the margin of action for many are overwhelmed by the constraints of a few? How do elites—ritual elders, Brahmanic priests, manorial lords, factory-managers—secure compliance to a normative order? How are expressions of submission and resistance woven together in a fabric of cultural understandings? How does a theory of culture enhance our analyses of the reconstitution of political authority from traditional kingship to modern nation-state, the encapsulation of pre-capitalist modes of production, and the attempts to convert “primordial sentiments” to “civic loyalties”? How do transnational fluidities and diasporic connections make instruments of nation-states contingent? These questions are some of the questions we immediately face when probing the intersections of culture, politics and representation, and they are the issues that lie behind this seminar. 

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Transregional

ANTH 515, EAST 515

Culture, History, Power, and Representation

Anne Aronsson
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This seminar critically explores how anthropologists use contemporary social theories to formulate the junctures of meaning, interest, and power. It thus aims to integrate symbolic, economic, and political perspectives on culture and social process. If culture refers to the understandings and meanings by which people live, then it constitutes the conventions of social life that are themselves produced in the flux of social life, invented by human activity. Theories of culture must therefore illuminate this problematic of agency and structure. They must show how social action can both reproduce and transform the structures of meaning, the conventions of social life. Even as such a position becomes orthodox in anthropology, it raises serious questions about the possibilities for ethnographic practice and theoretical analysis. How, for example, are such conventions generated and transformed where there are wide differentials of power and unequal access to resources? What becomes of our notions of humans as active agents of culture when the possibilities for maneuver and the margin of action for many are overwhelmed by the constraints of a few? How do elites—ritual elders, Brahmanic priests, manorial lords, factory-managers—secure compliance to a normative order? How are expressions of submission and resistance woven together in a fabric of cultural understandings? How does a theory of culture enhance our analyses of the reconstitution of political authority from traditional kingship to modern nation-state, the encapsulation of pre-capitalist modes of production, and the attempts to convert “primordial sentiments” to “civic loyalties”? How do transnational fluidities and diasporic connections make instruments of nation-states contingent? These questions are some of the questions we immediately face when probing the intersections of culture, politics and representation, and they are the issues that lie behind this seminar.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Transregional

ANTH 562

Unity and Diversity in Chinese Culture

Helen Siu
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

An exploration of the Chinese identity as it has been reworked over the centuries. Major works in Chinese anthropology and their intellectual connections with general anthropology and historical studies. Topics include kinship and marriage, marketing systems, rituals and popular religion, ethnicity and state making, and the cultural nexus of power.

Permission of instructor required.

China

ANTH 575, EAST 575

Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations, class, gender, ethnicity, migration, and global landscapes of power and citizenship.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional

ANTH 736, ARCG 736

Advanced Topics in Asian Archaeology

This seminar reviews the archaeology of Asia of the Pleistocene and Holocene epochs with emphasis on East, Southeast, and South Asia. Asian archaeology remains little known to most Western researchers, although some of the earliest hominid remains and some of the most powerful states are found in that part of the world. The course emphasizes the particularities of Asian cultural sequences, while illustrating how processes in these sequences compare to those found elsewhere in the world. The diverse Asian record provides a basis for refining key concepts in anthropological archaeology, including domestication, inequality and hierarchy, heterarchy, and complexity. Topics to be covered include history and theory in Asian archaeology; the Pleistocene and paleolithic record of Asia; origins of plant and animal domestication; early farming communities; models of complexity; and early states and empires.

China, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia

ARCH 3265

Architecture and Urbanism of Modern Japan

Yoko Kawai
W 2:00 PM - 3:50 PM
Fall

This course examines how design philosophies and methodologies were developed in Japanese architecture during the 130-year period from the Meiji Restoration until the postmodern era. Special attention is paid to the process of urbanization through repeated destructions and the forming of cultural identity through mutual interactions with the West, both of which worked as major forces that shaped architectural developments. Highlighted architects include Chuta Ito, Goichi Takeda, Frank Lloyd Wright, Kameki Tsuchiura, Sutemi Horiguchi, Kunio Maekawa, Kenzo¯ Tange, Arata Isozaki, Fumihiko Maki, Kisho Kurokawa, Kazuo Shinohara, Tadao Ando, and Mirei Shigemori. Historical photos and excerpts from films are used to better understand context. Students are required to make in-class presentations and write a final paper.

Japan

ARCH 341, GLBL 253, LAST 318, URBN 341

Globalization Space

Keller Easterling
HTBA
Spring

Infrastructure space as a primary medium of change in global polity. Networks of trade, energy, communication, transportation, spatial products, finance, management, and labor, as well as new strains of political opportunity that reside within their spatial disposition. Case studies include free zones and automated ports around the world, satellite urbanism in South Asia, high-speed rail in Japan and the Middle East, agripoles in southern Spain, fiber optic submarine cable in East Africa, spatial products of tourism in North Korea, and management platforms of the International Organization for Standardization.

Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

CHNS 110

Elementary Modern Chinese I

Jingjing Ao, Min Chen, Yu-Lin Wang Saussy, Jianhua Shen, Yongtao Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Intended for students with no background in Chinese. An intensive course with emphasis on spoken language and drills. Pronunciation, grammatical analysis, conversation practice, and introduction to reading and writing Chinese characters.

This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 112

Elementary Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Chuanmei Sun
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

First level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with some aural proficiency but very limited ability in reading and writing Chinese. Training in listening and speaking, with emphasis on reading and writing.

Placement confirmed by placement test and by instructor.

China

CHNS 120

Elementary Modern Chinese II

Jingjing Ao, Rongzhen Li, Fan Liu, Yu-Lin Wang Saussy, Jianhua Shen, Yongtao Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 110.

After CHNS 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 122

Elementary Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Chuanmei Sun
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 112.

After CHNS 112 or equivalent

China

CHNS 130

Intermediate Modern Chinese I

Jingjing Ao, Ninghui Liang, Haiwen Wang, William Zhou
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An intermediate course that continues intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and consolidates achievements from the first year of study. Students improve oral fluency, study more complex grammatical structures, and enlarge both reading and writing vocabulary.

After CHNS 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 132

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Min Chen, Fan Liu, Wei Su, Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate oral proficiency and elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them.

After CHNS 122 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 140

Intermediate Modern Chinese II

Jingjing Ao, Ninghui Liang, Haiwen Wang, William Zhou
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 130. To be followed by CHNS 150.

After CHNS 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 142

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Min Chen, Fan Liu, Wei Su, Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 132.

After CHNS 132 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 150

Advanced Modern Chinese I

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Chuanmei Sun, Haiwen Wang
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Third level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Use of audiovisual materials, oral presentations, skits, and longer and more frequent writing assignments to assimilate more sophisticated grammatical structures. Further introduction to a wide variety of written forms and styles. Use of both traditional and simplified forms of Chinese characters.

After CHNS 140 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 151

Advanced Modern Chinese II

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Chuanmei Sun, Haiwen Wang
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 150.

After CHNS 150 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 152

Advanced Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Yu-Lin Wang Saussy, Peisong Xu
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

This course is intended for heritage speakers with intermediate high to advanced low speaking and listening skills and with intermediate reading and writing skills. The class follows CHNS 142 in the heritage track. The goal of the course is to help students effectively expand their skills in reading and writing while concurrently addressing the need to improve their listening and oral skills in formal environments. The materials cover a variety of topics relating to Chinese culture, society, and cultural differences, supplemented with authentic video materials. 

After CHNS 142 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 153

Advanced Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Yu-Lin Wang Saussy, Peisong Xu
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

This course is intended for heritage speakers at the low advanced level with advanced low speaking and listening skills and with intermediate high to advanced low reading and writing proficiency. This course follows CHNS 152 in the heritage track. The goal of the course is to help students effectively expand their skills in reading and writing while concurrently addressing the need to improve their listening and oral skills in formal environments. The materials cover a variety of topics relating to Chinese culture, society, and cultural differences, supplemented with authentic video materials.

After CHNS 152 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 156

Advanced Modern Chinese through Film for Heritage Speakers

Ninghui Liang
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

This course is designed to consolidate students’ grasp of the language through the use of films, TV programs, videos on social media, and authentic written materials. Activities include presentations, group discussions, written assignments, and projects. Open to heritage learners with intermediate to advanced oral proficiency and intermediate-low reading and writing proficiency. 

After CHNS 142 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 157

Advanced Modern Chinese through Film for Heritage Speakers

Ninghui Liang
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

This course is designed to consolidate students’ grasp of the language through the use of films, TV programs, videos on social media, and authentic written materials. Activities include presentations, group discussions, written assignments, and projects. Open to heritage learners with intermediate to advanced oral proficiency and intermediate-low reading and writing proficiency. 

After CHNS 142 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 158

Advanced Modern Chinese III

Ninghui Liang, Yongtao Zhang
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Fourth level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Readings in a wide range of subjects form the basis of discussion and other activities. Students consolidate their skills, especially speaking proficiency, at an advanced level. Materials use both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 151 or equivalent

China

CHNS 159

Advanced Modern Chinese III

Jianhua Shen, Yongtao Zhang
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 154.

After CHNS 154 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 162

Advanced Modern Chinese V

Rongzhen Li
MWF 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

This course is intended for both heritage and non-heritage learners with advanced proficiency. Students develop sophisticated language skills through working with authentic written materials, images, and videos concerning historical events, historical figures, artists, writers, and philosophers. Activities include working with translation tools, discussions, debates, presentations, oral and written exercises on platforms such as Playposit and Perusall, and collaborative projects.

After CHNS 153, 157, 159, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 163

Advanced Modern Chinese VI

Rongzhen Li
MWF 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

This course is intended for both heritage and non-heritage learners with advanced proficiency. Students develop sophisticated language skills through working with authentic written materials, images, and videos concerning historical events, historical figures, artists, writers, and philosophers. Activities include working with translation tools, discussions, debates, presentations, oral and written exercises on platforms such as Playposit and Perusall, and collaborative projects. 

After CHNS 153, CHNS 157, CHNS 159, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 164

Chinese for Reading Contemporary Fiction

Wei Su
MW 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM or T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Selected readings in Chinese fiction of the 1980s and 1990s. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 165

Readings in Modern Chinese Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

We read and discuss modern short stories, most written prior to 1949, for the purpose of developing advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing. 

After CHNS 153, 157, 159, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 166

Chinese for Current Affairs

William Zhou
MW 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM or T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on speaking and writing in formal styles. Current affairs are used as a vehicle to help students learn advanced vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, complex sentence structures, news writing styles and formal stylistic register. Materials include texts and videos selected from news media worldwide to improve students’ language proficiency for sophisticated communications on a wide range of topics. 

After CHNS 153, 157, or 159

China

CHNS 167

Chinese for Current Affairs

William Zhou
MW 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM or T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on speaking and writing in formal styles. Current affairs are used as a vehicle to help students learn advanced vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, complex sentence structures, news writing styles and formal stylistic register. Materials include texts and videos selected from news media worldwide to improve students’ language proficiency for sophisticated communications on a wide range of topics. 

After CHNS 153, 157, or 159

China

CHNS 168

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Min Chen
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 153, 157, 159 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 169

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Min Chen
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 153, 157, 159 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 170

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Pauline Lin
MW 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, CHNS 153, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 171

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 170.

After CHNS 170 or equivalent

China

CHNS 172

Chinese for Scholarly Conversation

Jianhua Shen
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

This course aims to bring students to advanced competence in all aspects of modern Chinese, and prepare students for advanced research or employment in a variety of China-related fields. Materials include readings on contemporary social, cultural, and political issues, which are written by prominent scholar writers in related fields. This level is suitable for students who have had four years of college Chinese prior to attending, or who have taken three years of an accelerated program meant for heritage speakers. 

Prerequisite: CHNS 155, 157, 159 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

China

CHNS 570

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Pauline Lin
MW 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, 153, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 571

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 570.

After CHNS 570 or equivalent.

China

EALL 200, CHNS 200, EAST 240, HUMS 270

The Chinese Tradition

Lucas Bender, Fan Liu
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

An introduction to the literature, culture, and thought of premodern China, from the beginnings of the written record to the turn of the twentieth century. Close study of textual and visual primary sources, with attention to their historical and cultural backdrops.

Students enrolled in CHNS 200 join a weekly Mandarin-language discussion section. No knowledge of Chinese required for students enrolled in EALL 200. Students enrolled in CHNS 200 must have L5 proficiency in Mandarin or permission of the course instructor.

China

EALL 203, HUMS 284, LITR 198

The Tale of Genji

James Scanlon-Canegata
T,Th 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Fall

A reading of the central work of prose fiction in the Japanese classical tradition in its entirety (in English translation) along with some examples of predecessors, parodies, and adaptations (the latter include Noh plays and twentieth-century short stories). Topics of discussion include narrative form, poetics, gendered authorship and readership, and the processes and premises that have given The Tale of Genji its place in “world literature.” Attention will also be given to the text’s special relationship to visual culture.

No knowledge of Japanese required. A previous college-level course in the study of literary texts is recommended but not required.

Japan

EALL 212, PHIL 203

Ancient Chinese Thought

Mick Hunter
MW 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

An introduction to the foundational works of ancient Chinese thought from the ruling ideologies of the earliest historical dynasties, through the Warring States masters, to the Qin and Han empires. Topics include Confucianism and Daoism, the role of the intellectual in ancient Chinese society, and the nature and performance of wisdom.

China

EALL 248, LITR 254

Modern Chinese Literature

David Xu Borgonjon
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

An introduction to modern Chinese literature. Themes include cultural go-betweens; sensations in the body; sexuality; diaspora, translation, and nationalism; globalization and homeland; and everyday life.

No knowledge of Chinese required. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 252, EAST 251, FILM 446, LITR 384

Japanese Cinema before 1960

Aaron Gerow
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

The history of Japanese cinema to 1960, including the social, cultural, and industrial backgrounds to its development. Periods covered include the silent era, the coming of sound and the wartime period, the occupation era, the golden age of the 1950s, and the new modernism of the late 1950s.

No knowledge of Japanese required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 256, EAST 358, GLBL 251, HUMS 272, LITR 265

China in the World

Jing Tsu
HTBA
Spring

Recent headlines about China in the world, deciphered in both modern and historical contexts. Interpretation of new events and diverse texts through transnational connections. Topics include China and Africa, Mandarinization, Chinese America, science and technology, science fiction, and entrepreneurship culture.

Readings and discussion in English. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 263, EAST 409, LITR 184

Ecocritical Theory and Japanese Literature

Christine Marran
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

In this course students develop familiarity with principle theories and discourses that enable serious consideration of the more-than-human world in literature. Students analyze how theories of the material turn and the nonhuman turn and specific works of Japanese and Japanese-American/Canadian literature are productive and necessary to area studies and literary studies in our age of rising seas. We analyze different concepts of the material and more-than-human world through various schools of thought including new materialism, speculative realism, object-oriented ontology, obligate storytelling, and archipelagic/aquapelagic thinking. We discuss core movements in theory and treat literary forms as their own site of theoretical production. We explore how to incorporate these new materialist and speculative realist perspectives into our own literary analysis and the merits for doing so.

Japanese proficiency is not required for this course. Those with Japanese proficiency will be invited to meet at a separate time to engage with Japanese-language texts. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 280, EAST 260, FILM 307

East Asian Martial Arts Film

Aaron Gerow
MW 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM, Screenings T 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM
Fall

The martial arts film has not only been a central genre for many East Asian cinemas, it has been the cinematic form that has most defined those cinemas for others. Domestically, martial arts films have served to promote the nation, while on the international arena, they have been one of the primary conduits of transnational cinematic interaction, as kung-fu or samurai films have influenced films inside and outside East Asia, from The Matrix to Kill Bill. Martial arts cinema has become a crucial means for thinking through such issues as nation, ethnicity, history, East vs. West, the body, gender, sexuality, stardom, industry, spirituality, philosophy, and mediality, from modernity to postmodernity. It is thus not surprising that martial arts films have also attracted some of the world’s best filmmakers, ranging from Kurosawa Akira to Wong Kar Wai. This course focuses on films from Japan, China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and South Korea—as well as on works from other countries influenced by them—covering such martial arts genres such as the samurai film, kung-fu, karate, wuxia, and related historical epics. It provides a historical survey of each nation and genre, while connecting them to other genres, countries, and media.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 300, EAST 340

Sinological Methods

Pauline Lin
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

A research course in Chinese studies, designed for students with background in modern and literary Chinese. Explore and evaluate the wealth of primary sources and research tools available in China and in the West. For native speakers of Chinese, introduction to the secondary literature in English and instruction in writing professionally in English on topics about China. Topics include Chinese bibliographies; bibliophiles’ notes; specialized dictionaries; maps and geographical gazetteers; textual editions, variations and reliability of texts; genealogies and biographical sources; archaeological and visual materials; and major Chinese encyclopedias, compendia, and databases.

Prerequisite: CHNS 171 or equivalent. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 503

The Tale of Genji

James Scanlon-Canegata
T,Th 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Fall

A reading of the central work of prose fiction in the Japanese classical tradition in its entirety (in English translation) along with some examples of predecessors, parodies, and adaptations (the latter include Noh plays and twentieth-century short stories). Topics of discussion include narrative form, poetics, gendered authorship and readership, and the processes and premises that have given The Tale of Genji its place in world literature. Attention is also given to the text’s special relationship to visual culture. 

No knowledge of Japanese required. A previous college-level course in the study of literary texts is recommended but not required.

Japan

EALL 512

Ancient Chinese Thought

Mick Hunter
MW 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

An introduction to the foundational works of ancient Chinese thought from the ruling ideologies of the earliest historical dynasties, through the Warring States masters, to the Qin and Han empires. Topics include Confucianism and Daoism, the role of the intellectual in ancient Chinese society, and the nature and performance of wisdom.

This is primarily an undergraduate course; graduate students are provided readings in the original language and meet in an additional session to review translations.

China

EALL 552, EAST 581, FILM 881

Japanese Cinema before 1960

Aaron Gerow
MW 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

The history of Japanese cinema to 1960, including the social, cultural, and industrial backgrounds to its development. Periods covered include the silent era, the coming of sound and the wartime period, the occupation era, the golden age of the 1950s, and the new modernism of the late 1950s.

Japan

EALL 563, EAST 509

Ecocritical Theory and Japanese Literature

Christine Marran
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

In this course students develop familiarity with key theories and discourses that enable serious consideration of the more-than-human world in literature. Students analyze how theories of the material turn, the nonhuman turn, and specific works of Japanese and Japanese-American/Canadian literature are productive and necessary to area studies and literary studies in our age of rising seas. We analyze different concepts of the material and more-than-human world through various schools of thought including new materialism, speculative realism, object-oriented ontology, obligate storytelling, and archipelagic/aquapelagic thinking. We discuss core movements in theory and treat literary forms as their own site of theoretical production. We explore how to incorporate these new materialist and speculative realist perspectives into our own literary analysis and the merits for doing so.

Advanced undergraduate and graduate students from all departments are invited to take this course. Required readings will be in English or English translation. Students are asked to read approximately 200 pages per week on average. Students are encouraged to consider the relevance of these methodological approaches to their own research and primary materials. No Japanese proficiency is required for this course.

Japan

EALL 600, EAST 640

Sinological Methods

Pauline Lin
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

A research course in Chinese studies, designed for students with background in modern and literary Chinese. Students explore and evaluate the wealth of primary sources and research tools available in China and in the West. For native speakers of Chinese, introduction to the secondary literature in English and instruction in writing professionally in English on topics about China. Topics include Chinese bibliographies; bibliophiles’ notes; specialized dictionaries; maps and geographical gazetteers; textual editions, variations, and reliability of texts; genealogies and biographical sources; archaeological and visual materials; and major Chinese encyclopedias, compendia, and databases.

China

EALL 733

Zhuangzi

Mick Hunter
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

An in-depth examination of one of the great masterworks of ancient philosophy. Topics vary according to student interest but include: the interpretation of the text, its formation and history, its reception in the commentarial and scholarly literature, and its role in the modern construction of classical Chinese philosophy. This seminar is designed primarily for students who can read classical Chinese but is also open to students reading the text in translation. In that event, we will hold separate sessions for students working in the original language. 

Proficiency in classical Chinese is preferred but not absolutely necessary.

China

EALL 745

Readings in Medieval Chinese Thought

Lucas Bender
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This class considers documents pertaining to the intellectual history of medieval China, roughly from the end of the Han dynasty in 220 CE to the end of the Tang dynasty in 907. 

Texts change from term to term. Readings are in the original, so prospective students should have a firm background in Literary Chinese. Prerequisites: CHNS 170 and 171 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor

China

EALL 893, FILM 893

Japanese Comedy

Aaron Gerow
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Survey of the history of Japanese comedy, focusing on humor in Japanese performance, literature, cinema, television, and other media, and analyzing its socio-cultural and ideological implications over time. The seminar will concentrate on the Meiji period on, though it will cover some of the history before that. 

Knowledge of Japanese is required.

Japan

EAST 300, EALL 297, FILM 342

Global Korean Cinema

Tian Li
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

In recent times, world cinema has witnessed the rise of South Korean cinema as an alternative to Hollywood and includes many distinguished directors such as Park Chan-wook, Lee Chang-dong, Kim Ki-duk, and Bong Joon-ho. This course explores the Korean film history and aesthetics from its colonial days (1910-1945) to the hallyu era (2001-present), and also analyzes several key texts that are critical for understanding this field of study. How is Korean cinema shaped by (re)interpretations of history and society? How do we understand Korean cinema vis-à-vis the public memories of the Korean War, industrialization, social movements, economic development, and globalization? And how do aesthetics and storytelling in Korean cinema contribute to its popularity among local spectators and to its globality in shaping the contours of world cinema? By deeply inquiring into such questions, students learn how to critically view, think about, and write about film. Primary texts include literature and film. All films are screened with English subtitles.

Korea

EAST 302, EALL 298, FILM 345

Politics of East Asian Screen Culture

Tian Li
HTBA
Spring

East Asian screen culture, ranging from cinema, television, musical video, to online games, has (re)shaped the global and national/regional imaginings of East Asia. The Post-Cold War intensification of intra-Asian interactions has precipitated the rise of a Pan-Asian regional identity wherein the nation-state is not yet obsolete. What role does screen culture play in the border-crossing interplay among languages, ideologies, aesthetics, and affect? How do we understand the storytelling and politics of East Asian screen cultures in relation to its historical and social context? How does screen culture capture local/global desires in a digital time? Within the contemporary media ecologies, how does screen culture create an audiovisual relation that traverses screen and actuality? How do screen culture continue to push forward the history of transformation of sign system from the written words to visual moving images in the contemporary sensory over-loaded world of screens. This course deals with issues of (trans)nationalism, (un)translatability, locality and globality, (post)modernity, virtuality and actuality, and politics of gender. Students learn how to think and write about screen cultures of East Asia in particular and of contemporary screen culture in general.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 400, RLST 366

Religion and Politics in China, Xinjiang, and Tibet


HTBA
Spring

This course explores the religious and political interactions among the Chinese, Tibetans, Mongolians, and Muslims living in today’s northwest China from the fourteenth to the twentieth century. Focusing on parallel spatial arrangements and historical narratives of these ethnoculturally diverse peoples, the first part of this course investigates the evolving political systems, religious institutions, and social structures in China, Xinjiang and Tibet. Shifting from the center-periphery perspective to the bottom-up perspective, the second part examines major issues associated with interethnic relations. We critically read both primary and secondary sources. Key themes include Chinese imperialism and colonialism, Tibetan Buddhist expansion, Mongolian conquest, Islamization and Muslim resettlement, transregional trade, frontier militarization, ethnic violence, and inter-ethnocultural accommodation. 

China

EAST 408, PLSC 418

Japanese Politics and Society

Charles McClean
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

This class introduces students to 12 important puzzles about contemporary Japanese politics and society, discusses various ways in which scholars have attempted to solve these puzzles, and suggests pathways for future research. Together, we seek to explain public policy outcomes across a wide range of topics, including gender equality, nuclear energy, territorial disputes, population aging, and immigration. In the process, we learn (1) the important actors in Japanese politics (e.g., voters, politicians, parties, bureaucrats, and firms); (2) the positions that different actors take with respect to various policies, as well as the sources of these policy preferences; and (3) how political institutions block or enhance the representation of these actors’ interests. 

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EAST 414, PLSC 373

State Building in China and Beyond

Peng Peng
HTBA
Spring

One of the most critical developments in the world system over the last few decades has been the rise of China. Existing state-building theories emphasize the role of warfare and industrialization in explaining why some states are strong. However, these factors are insufficient to explain the political development of the Chinese state. It would be impossible to understand China’s present without understanding its past. This seminar aims at understanding the origin and development of the Chinese state, and its consequences. 

Permission of instructor required.

China

EAST 425, ER&M 411, SOCY 425

Migration in East Asia and Beyond

Angela McClean
HTBA
Spring

Over the past few decades, East Asia has become a new destination region for migrants, the phenomenon of which is continuing to cause fierce public and political discussions on national identity and immigration and integration policies. This course explores various types, debates, and industries of migration in contemporary East Asia. While we focus largely on Japan and South Korea, we also have an opportunity to discuss migrant experiences in other popular destination and origin countries in Asia including China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Taiwan. Starting with the major theories and concepts in international migration, we examine East Asian migration regimes, connections between migration and high- and low-skilled labor, gender, co-ethnics, and families, as well as state, public, and civil society responses to migration. 

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 470

Independent Study

Valerie Hansen
HTBA
Fall

For students with advanced Chinese, Japanese, or Korean language skills who wish to pursue a close study of the East Asia region, not otherwise covered by departmental offerings. May be used for research, a special project, or a substantial research paper under faculty supervision. A term paper or its equivalent and regular meetings with an adviser are required. Ordinarily only one term may be offered toward the major or for credit toward the degree. 

Permission to enroll requires submission of a detailed project proposal, signed by the adviser, by the end of the first week of classes and its approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 470

Independent Study

For students with advanced Chinese, Japanese, or Korean language skills who wish to pursue a close study of the East Asia region, not otherwise covered by departmental offerings. May be used for research, a special project, or a substantial research paper under faculty supervision. A term paper or its equivalent and regular meetings with an adviser are required. Ordinarily only one term may be offered toward the major or for credit toward the degree. 

Permission to enroll requires submission of a detailed project proposal, signed by the adviser, by the end of the first week of classes and its approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 491

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 492

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 504, HSAR 785

The Beginnings of Nagasaki (1560-1640)

Reinier H. Hesselink
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

The city of Nagasaki is well-known throughout the world for having been the second target of the atomic bomb attacks ending the Pacific War in August of 1945. In view of the city’s cosmopolitan history, this was a particularly bitter result of the vagaries of warfare. In this seminar, we go back to the city’s origins to explore its essence as a meeting point between East and West. We do so guided by readings dealing with the ephemeral, initial phase of its existence as Japan’s only Christian town, roughly between 1560 and 1640. Christianity is presented and analyzed from an anthropological/historical perspective as an ideological discourse accompanying the Iberian thrust across the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EAST 507, HSAR 786

The Dutch in Japan (1600-1868)

After the elimination of Christianity from the permitted religious options in Japan and the simultaneous expulsion of the Portuguese from the country’s trading networks, the Dutch trade with Japan was transferred from Hirado to Nagasaki in 1641. In this way, Nagasaki was allowed to keep its function as an intermediary between Japan and the Western world. In contrast to its short-lived Christian identity, Nagasaki’s exclusive relationship with the Dutch lasted for more than two centuries. In this seminar, we explore this long standing relationship from a variety of viewpoints and epistemes: patterns of exchange, negotiation and diplomacy, objects and materials, language barriers and language learning, the use of Dutch sources to write Japanese history etc.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EAST 900

Master’s Thesis

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 900

Master's Thesis

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 910

Independent Study

By arrangement with faculty and with approval of the DGS.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 910

Independent Study

By arrangement with faculty and with approval of the DGS.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

GLBL 355

The United States, China, and the Origins of the Korean Peninsula Crisis

David Rank
HTBA
Spring

This course looks at the current situation on the Korean Peninsula and the interaction of the major players there through historical and diplomatic practitioners’ perspectives. The strategic interests of major powers intersect on the Korean Peninsula to a degree found in few other places on earth. In a part of the globe China long viewed as within its sphere of influence, four nuclear powers now rub shoulders and the United States maintains a military presence. With the Armistice that ended the Korean War still in place, Northeast Asia is the Cold War’s last front, but today’s nuclear crisis makes it more than a historical curiosity. Drawing on original diplomatic documents and other source materials, as well as first-hand experience of current-day diplomats, this course considers the trajectory of the two Korea’s relationships with the United States and China and their role in the international politics of East Asia.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Korea, Transregional

GLBL 6165

China’s Rise and the Future of Foreign Policy

David Rank
Th 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

China’s return to its traditional role as a regional—and, increasingly, global—power has implications for the political, security, and economic structures that have been the foundation of the international system since the end of the Second World War. This course looks at the impact China’s ascent has had, the challenges a rising China will pose for policy makers in the years ahead, and the internal issues China will need to address in the years ahead. It does so from the perspective of a practitioner who spent nearly three decades working on U.S. foreign policy and U.S.-China relations.

China

GLBL 6285

China's Challenge to the Global Economic Order


T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

In the decades after 1979, China’s adherence to key tenets of the U.S.-backed liberal international economic system enabled it to achieve middle income status. After the 2008-9 global financial crisis, however, weaknesses in the U.S. model combined with China’s own sustained growth increased Beijing’s confidence in an alternative, state-oriented model that increasingly underpins China’s foreign economic engagement. This course examines the Global Security and Belt and Road initiatives, trade, investment, and development policies, international organization advocacy, business practices, and other aspects of China’s growing international economic footprint. These factors are analyzed from the perspective of China’s internal dynamics, competition with the United States, and overall foreign policy goals, and are evaluated for their impact on the prevailing global economic order. The course is taught by a practitioner who spent over a decade managing U.S. Government economic policy in and on China. 

Permission of the instructor required.

China

HIST 302J

Korea and the Japanese Empire in Critical Contexts

Hannah Shepherd
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This course addresses critical moments of contact, conflict, and connection in the modern histories of Korea and Japan. Each week our discussion and readings focus on a specific event, before looking at the wider contexts involved and historical debates they have produced. This is not a comparative study of the histories of the different countries, but a chance to focus on themes—nationalism, colonial oppression, collaboration, war, identity—which continue to shape both relations between Japan, South Korea and North Korea, and the work of historians today.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan, Korea, Transregional

HIST 307, EAST 301

The Making of Japan's Great Peace, 1550-1850

Fabian Drixler
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Examination of how, after centuries of war in Japan and overseas, the Tokugawa shogunate built a peace that lasted more than 200 years. Japan’s urban revolution, the eradication of Christianity, the Japanese discovery of Europe, and the question whether Tokugawa Japan is a rare example of a complex and populous society that achieved ecological sustainability.

Japan

HIST 321, EAST 220

China from Present to Past

Valerie Hansen
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Underlying causes of current issues facing China traced back to their origins in the premodern period. Topics include economic development, corruption, environmental crises, gender, and Pacific island disputes. Selected primary-source readings in English, images, videos, and Web resources.

China

HIST 326J, EAST 326

Yale and Japan

Daniel Botsman
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Exploration of Yale’s rich historical connections to Japan. Focus on use of the University’s museum and library collections to learn about various aspects of the Japanese past, from ancient times to the post-World War II era.

Knowledge of Japanese helpful but not required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

HIST 353

20th Century Japan: Empire & Aftermath

Hannah Shepherd
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

In 1905, in a victory which shocked the world, Japan defeated Imperial Russia in a regional conflict over control of Korea. To many in Asia and the non-Western world, Japan looked like a new model of anti-Western, anti-imperial modernity. However, the ensuing decades would see this image contested. The expansion of Japan’s political and economic power into East Asia over the first half of the twentieth century has shaped the region in ways still visible today. This course is split into three parts, each covering roughly two decades. First, we look at the legacies of Japan’s Meiji Restoration and the development of what has been called an “Imperial Democracy” in early 20th century Japan. Next, we look at the crises which rocked Japan in the 1930s and marked a new era. Finally, we deal with the aftermath of empire—both in the immediate “postwar” era for Japan, and in the debates over imperial legacies and history which still reverberate in Japan and many of its former colonies today.

Japan

HIST 881

China's Age of Discovery

Valerie Hansen
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Study of China’s maritime history focusing on the period 1000–1500, culminating with the Zheng He voyages and their cancellation. English-language readings in secondary sources and primary sources in translation; examination of relevant maps in Beinecke’s collection. Separate section for those with a reading knowledge of classical Chinese.

English-language readings in secondary sources and primary sources in translation; examination of relevant maps in Beinecke’s collection. Separate section for those with a reading knowledge of classical Chinese.

China

HIST 884

Readings in the History of Modern Japan

Hannah Shepherd
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This course offers students an opportunity to explore recent English-language scholarship on the history of modern Japan (post-1868).

Japan

HIST 888, RLST 592

Society and Religion on the Silk Road

Eric Greene, Valerie Hansen
W 1:30 - 5:30
Fall

An introduction to artifacts and documents pertaining to social history and religion from the most important sites on the Northern and Southern Silk Roads in China, including Niya, Kizil, Turfan, and Dunhuang. Assigned readings are in English. Readers of Chinese also participate in a separate section reading documents in classical Chinese from Turfan and Dunhuang.

Permission of instructor required.

China

HIST 889, EAST 889

Research in Japanese History

Fabian Drixler, Hannah Shepherd
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

After a general introduction to the broad array of sources and reference materials available for conducting research related to the history of Japan since ca. 1600, students prepare original research papers on topics of their own choosing in a collaborative workshop environment.

Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Japanese.

Japan

HSAR 119, EAST 119

Introduction to the History of Art: Asian Art and Culture

Quincy Ngan
MW 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

This introductory course explores the art of India, China, Japan, and Korea from prehistory to the present. We consider major works and monuments from all four regions. Themes include the representation of nature and the body, the intersection of art with spirituality and politics, and everything from elite to consumer culture. All students welcome, including those who have no previous experience with either art history or the study of Asian art. This class makes frequent visits to Yale University Art Gallery.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

HSAR 427, EAST 427

Chinese Skin Problems

Quincy Ngan
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This seminar uses artwork as a means of understanding the various skin problems faced by contemporary Chinese people. Divided into four modules, this seminar first traces how the “ideal skin” as a complex trope of desire, superficiality, and deception has evolved over time through the ghost story, Painted Skin (Huapi), and its countless spin-offs. Second, the course explores how artists have overcome a variety of social distances and barriers through touch; we look at artworks that highlight the healing power and erotic associations of cleansing, massaging, and moisturizing the skin. Third, we explore the relationship between feminism and gender stereotypes through artworks and performances that involve skincare, makeup and plastic surgery. Fourth, the course investigates the dynamics between “Chineseness,” colorism, and racial tensions through the artworks produced by Chinese-American and diasporic artists. Each module is comprised of one meeting focusing on theoretical frameworks and two meetings focusing on individual artists and close analysis of artworks. Readings include Cathy Park Hong’s Minor Feelings, Nikki Khanna’s Whiter, and Leta Hong Fincher’s Leftover Women.  

Permission of instructor required

China

HSAR 449, EAST 449

Nanban Art: Japan's Artistic Encounter with Early Modern Europe

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

Exploratory and investigative in nature, this seminar is conceived as a baseline engagement with the intersections of art, religion, science, commerce, war, and diplomacy at Kyoto and Nagasaki in the age of Japanese, Chinese, Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch, and English political and mercantile interaction in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It addresses a set of themes whose point of entry is the entangled character of visual production and reception in Japan at a tipping point in the emergence of global modernity, when what were called the Nanbans—“Southern Barbarians,” i.e. Europeans—began to arrive in Japan. The question of whether or not much-theorized nomenclatures such as baroque, rococo, mestizo, and even global modernity are pertinent to analysis from the Japanese and Asian perspective constitutes the backbone of the course and its primary objective in the study of a corpus of visual materials spanning the European and Asian cultural spheres. As such the seminar is not only about Japan, per se, or about Japanese objects, or the shogunal eye. It is equally about how Japan and Japanese objects and materials, along with objects and materials from other places, figured in a greater community of exchange, friction, confrontation, conquest, and adaptation in times when Portuguese marauders, Jesuit missionaries, Muslim traders, and Japanese pirates found themselves in the same waters, on ships laden with goods, making landfall in the domains of Japan’s great military hegemons.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

JAPN 110

Elementary Japanese I

Hiroyo Nishimura, Mari Stever, Mika Yamaguchi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Introductory language course for students with no previous background in Japanese. Development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, including 50 hiragana, 50 katakana, and 75 kanji characters. Introduction to cultural aspects such as levels of politeness and group concepts. In-class drills in pronunciation and conversation. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 120

Elementary Japanese II

Kumiko Nakamura, Hiroyo Nishimura, Mari Stever
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 110, with supplementary materials such as excerpts from television shows, anime, and songs. Introduction of 150 additional kanji.

After JAPN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 130

Intermediate Japanese I

Kumiko Nakamura
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Continued development in both written and spoken Japanese. Aspects of Japanese culture, such as history, art, religion, and cuisine, explored through text, film, and animation. Online audio and visual aids facilitate listening, as well as the learning of grammar and kanji. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 140

Intermediate Japanese II

Mika Yamaguchi
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 130.

After JAPN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 150

Advanced Japanese I

Mari Stever
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM; 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

Advanced language course that further develops proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Reading and discussion materials include works by Nobel Prize winners. Japanese anime and television dramas are used to enhance listening and to develop skills in culturally appropriate speech. Writing of essays, letters, and criticism solidifies grammar and style. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 140 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 151

Advanced Japanese II

Hiroyo Nishimura
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 150.

After JAPN 150 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 156

Advanced Japanese III

Mika Yamaguchi
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

Close reading of modern Japanese writing on current affairs, social science, history, and literature. Development of speaking and writing skills in academic settings, including formal speeches, interviews, discussions, letters, e-mail, and expository writing. Interviews of and discussions with native speakers on current issues. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 157

Advanced Japanese IV

Kumiko Nakamura
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 156.

After JAPN 156 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 170

Introduction to Literary Japanese

James Scanlon-Canegata
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 570

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

KREN 110

Elementary Korean I

Seunghee Back, Angela Lee-Smith, Hyun Sung Lim
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

A beginning course in modern Korean. Pronunciation, lectures on grammar, conversation practice, and introduction to the writing system (Hankul).

This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 120

Elementary Korean II

Seunghee Back, Seungja Choi, Hyun Sung Lim
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 110.

After KREN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 130

Intermediate Korean I

Seungja Choi, Hyun Sung Lim
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Continued development of skills in modern Korean, spoken and written, leading to intermediate-level proficiency.

After KREN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 132

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners I

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Intended for students with some oral proficiency but little or no training in Hankul. Focus on grammatical analysis, the standard spoken language, and intensive training in reading and writing.

This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 140

Intermediate Korean II

Hyun Sung Lim
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 130.

After KREN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 142

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 132.

After KREN 132 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 150

Advanced Korean I: Korean Language and Culture through K-Pop Music

Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An advanced language course with emphasis on developing vocabulary and grammar, practice reading comprehension, speaking on a variety of topics, and writing in both formal and informal styles. Use storytelling, discussion, peer group activities, audio and written journals, oral presentations, and supplemental audiovisual materials and texts in class. Intended for nonheritage speakers.

After KREN 140 or equivalent

Korea

KREN 151

Advanced Korean II: Language and Culture through Media

Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

This course is content and project-based to further develop integrated language skills-spoken and written, including grammar and vocabulary, as well as intercultural competence through Korean media. Through a variety of media, such as print media, publishing, digital media, cinema, broadcasting (radio, television, podcasting), and advertising, students explore and reflect on a wide range of topics and perspectives in Korean culture and society. The course learning activities include interactive, interpretive, and presentational communication; critical analysis; creative and authentic language applications in formal/informal contexts. 

After KREN 150 or equivalent.

Korea

KREN 152

Advanced Korean for Advanced Learners

Seunghee Back, Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM; 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An advanced course in modern Korean. Reading of short stories, essays, and journal articles, and introduction of 200 Chinese characters. Students develop their speaking and writing skills through discussions and written exercises.

After KREN 142 or 151, or with permission of instructor.

Korea

KREN 154

Advanced Korean III

Seunghee Back, Seungja Choi
MW 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM or T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

An advanced language course designed to develop reading and writing skills using Web-based texts in a variety of genres. Students read texts independently and complete comprehension and vocabulary exercises through the Web. Discussions, tests, and intensive writing training in class.

After KREN 152 or equivalent.

Korea

LAW 20670, GLBL 6170

Chinese Law and Society

Taisu Zhang
M 10:10 AM - 12:00 PM
Fall

This course will survey law and legal practice in the People’s Republic of China. Particular attention is given to the interaction of legal institutions with politics, social change, and economic development. Specific topics include, among others, the Party State, the nature of political legitimacy in contemporary Chinese society, state capitalism, the judiciary, property law and development, business and investment law, criminal law and procedure, media (especially the Internet), and major schools of Chinese legal and political thought.

Prior familiarity with Chinese history or politics is unnecessary but helpful. All course materials will be in English. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen.

China

PLSC 357, EAST 310, GLBL 309

The Rise of China

Daniel Mattingly
MW 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Analysis of contemporary Chinese politics, with focus on how the country has become a major power and how the regime has endured. Topics include China’s recent history, state, ruling party, economy, censorship, elite politics, and foreign policy.

China

REL 940

The Chinese Theologians

Chloe Starr
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This course examines select readings from Chinese church and academic theologians (including Hong Kong writers and diaspora voices) to explore the nature of Chinese Christian thought. The readings cover late imperial Roman Catholic writers, early republican Protestant thinkers, high communist-era church theologians, and contemporary Sino-Christian academic theologians. Students read primary materials in English, supplemented by background studies and lecture material to help make sense of the theological constructions that emerge. The course encourages reflection on the challenges for Christian mission in a communist context, on the tensions between church and state in the production of theologies, and on the challenges that Chinese Christianity poses for global Christian thought.

China

REL 941

Chinese and Japanese Christian Literature

Chloe Starr
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

What effect did Christianity have on modern Chinese literature, and what sort of Christianity emerges from Chinese Christian literature? Is Endō Shusakū the only Japanese Christian writer (and does Martin Scorsese’s film do justice to Endō’s novel Silence)? This course tackles such questions by tracing the development of a Christian literature in China and Japan from late Imperial times to the beginning of the twenty-first century, with particular focus on the heyday (in China) of the 1920s and ’30s, and on the Japanese side, on Endō’s postwar novels. Using texts available in English, the course examines how Christian ideas and metaphors permeated the literary—and revolutionary—imagination in East Asia. Though rarely clearly in evidence, the influence of Christianity on Chinese literature came directly through the Bible and church education and indirectly through translated European and Western literature. The course tests the aesthetic visions and construction of the human being from texts set among Japanese samurai in Mexico to the revolutionary throes of modern China.

China, Japan, Transregional

REL 983

China Mission

Chloe Starr
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

The Day Missions Collection at YDS is the strongest mission collection in the world, comprising about one third of the Divinity Library’s 500,000 volumes—and it is also the central repository in the United States for China-related mission papers. This course offers students the opportunity to complete an original research project in the library relating to mission in China, utilizing manuscript, microform, and monograph materials from the collections. For the first six weeks, students read intensively in mission history, theory, and practice, schematized through mission narratives. The next four weeks are “library lab” time: supervised reading time in special collection and archive materials within the library; reading into and developing projects while help is on hand for deciphering handwriting; providing reference tools for China, etc. The final two weeks are dedicated to research presentations and evaluation, with each student offering research findings to the class in any media chosen.

China

RLST 102, EAST 390

Atheism and Buddhism

Hwansoo Kim
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

A critical examination of atheism and religions (Buddhism), with a focus on intellectual, religious, philosophical, and scientific debates about God, the origin of the universe, morality, evolution, neuroscience, happiness, enlightenment, the afterlife, and karma. Readings selected from philosophical, scientific, and religious writings. Authors include some of the following: Charles Darwin, Bertrand Russell, Christopher Hitchins, Richard Dawkins, Deepak Chopra, Sam Harris, Owen Flanagan, Stephen Batchelor, and the Dalai Lama. 

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

RLST 121, EALL 296, EAST 391

Religion and Culture in Korea

Hwansoo Kim
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Introduction to Shamanism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Christianity, and new religions in Korea from ancient times to the present. Examination of religious traditions in close relationships with social, economic, political, and cultural environments in Korean society. Examination of religious tensions, philosophical arguments, and ethical issues that indigenous and foreign religions in Korea have engaged throughout history to maximize their influence in Korean society.  

Permission of instructor required.

Korea

RLST 127, PHIL 118, SAST 261

Buddhist Thought: The Foundations

Eric Greene
MWF 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

This class introduces the fundamentals of Buddhist thought, focusing on the foundational doctrinal, philosophical, and ethical ideas that have animated the Buddhist tradition from its earliest days in India 2500 years ago down to the present, in places such as Tibet, China, and Japan. Though there will be occasional discussion of the social and practical contexts of the Buddhist religion, the primary focus of this course lies on how traditional Buddhist thinkers conceptualize the universe, think about the nature of human beings, and propose that people should live their lives. Our main objects of inquiry are therefore the foundational Buddhist ideas, and the classic texts in which those ideas are put forth and defended, that are broadly speaking shared by all traditions of Buddhism. In the later part of the course, we take up some of these issues in the context of specific, regional forms of Buddhism, and watch some films that provide glimpses of Buddhist religious life on the ground. 

China, Japan, Transregional

RLST 135, EAST 335

Zen Buddhism

Eric Greene
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Survey of the history and teachings of Zen Buddhism in China and Japan. Emphasis on reading and interpretation of primary Zen texts in their historical and religious context, along with investigation of modern interpretations and appropriations of Zen in the West.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Transregional

RLST 574

Chinese Buddhist Texts

Eric Greene
HTBA
Spring

Close reading of selected Chinese Buddhist texts in the original.

Permission of instructor required.

China

SOCY 081, ER&M 081, MUSI 081

Race and Place in British New Wave, K-Pop, and Beyond

Grace Kao
M,W 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Fall

This seminar introduces you to several popular musical genres and explores how they are tied to racial, regional, and national identities. We examine how music is exported via migrants, return migrants, industry professionals, and the nation-state (in the case of Korean Popular Music, or K-Pop). Readings and discussions focus primarily on the British New Wave (from about 1979 to 1985) and K-Pop (1992-present), but we also discuss first-wave reggae, ska, rocksteady from the 1960s-70s, British and American punk rock music (1970s-1980s), the precursors of modern K-Pop, and have a brief discussion of Japanese City Pop. The class focuses mainly on the British New Wave and K-Pop because these two genres of popular music have strong ties to particular geographic areas, but they became or have become extremely popular in other parts of the world. We also investigate the importance of music videos in the development of these genres.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required. Permission of instructor required.

Korea, Transregional