CEAS Courses 2019-2020

This list is subject to modification.

Some of the information contained here may have changed since the time of publication. Always check with the department under which the course is listed or on Yale University Course Search to make sure that the courses you are interested in are still being offered and that the times have not changed.

If you have questions about any of the courses listed here, please contact the offering department directly.

ANTH 215, ARCG 215

Archaeology of China

Anne Underhill
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Archaeology of China, one of the world’s oldest and most enduring civilizations, from the era of early humans to early empires. Methods of interpreting remains from prehistoric and historic period sites.

China

ANTH 339

Urban Ethnography of Asia

Erik Harms
M 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Introduction to the anthropological study of contemporary Asian cities. Focus on new ethnographies about cities in East, Southeast, and South Asia. Topics include rural-urban migration, redevelopment, evictions, social movements, land grabbing, master-planned developments, heritage preservation, utopian aspirations, social housing, slums and precariousness, and spatial cleansing.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia

ANTH 342

Cultures and Markets in Asia

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Historical and contemporary movements of people, goods, and cultural meanings that have defined Asia as a region. Reexamination of state-centered conceptualizations of Asia and of established boundaries in regional studies. The intersections of transregional institutions and local societies and their effects on trading empires, religious traditions, colonial encounters, and cultural fusion. Finance flows that connect East Asia and the Indian Ocean to the Middle East and Africa. The cultures of capital and market in the neoliberal and postsocialist world.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

ANTH 362

Unity and Diversity in Chinese Culture

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

An exploration of the Chinese identity as it has been reworked over the centuries. Major works in Chinese anthropology and their intellectual connections with general anthropology and historical studies. Topics include kinship and marriage, marketing systems, rituals and popular religion, ethnicity and state making, and the cultural nexus of power.

Permission of instructor required.

China

ANTH 414, EAST 417

Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Helen Siu
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations; class, gender, ethnicity, and migration; and global landscapes of power and citizenship.

Permission of instructor required. This course meets during reading period.

China, Transregional

ANTH 539

Urban Ethnography of Asia

Erik Harms
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Introduction to the anthropological study of contemporary Asian cities. Focus on new ethnographies about cities in East, Southeast, and South Asia. Topics include rural-urban migration, redevelopment, evictions, social movements, land grabbing, master-planned developments, heritage preservation, utopian aspirations, social housing, slums and precariousness, and spatial cleansing.

China, Japan, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia

ANTH 541, F&ES 836, HIST 965, PLSC 779

Agrarian Societies: Culture, Society, History, and Development

Peter C. Perdue, James Scott, Elisabeth Wood
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

An interdisciplinary examination of agrarian societies, contemporary and historical, Western and non-Western. Major analytical perspectives from anthropology, economics, history, political science, and environmental studies are used to develop a meaning-centered and historically grounded account of the transformations of rural society.

Team-taught

China, Transregional, South Asia

ANTH 542

Cultures and Markets: Asia Connected through Time and Space

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Historical and contemporary movements of people, goods, and cultural meanings that have defined Asia as a region. Reexamination of state-centered conceptualizations of Asia and of established boundaries in regional studies. The intersections of transregional institutions and local societies and their effects on trading empires, religious traditions, colonial encounters, and cultural fusion. Finance flows that connect East Asia and the Indian Ocean to the Middle East and Africa. The cultures of capital and market in the neoliberal and postsocialist world.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

ANTH 562

Unity and Diversity in Chinese Culture

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

An exploration of the Chinese identity as it has been reworked over the centuries. Major works in Chinese anthropology and their intellectual connections with general anthropology and historical studies. Topics include kinship and marriage, marketing systems, rituals and popular religion, ethnicity and state making, and the cultural nexus of power.

China

ANTH 575, EAST 575

Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Helen Siu
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations, class, gender, ethnicity, migration, and global landscapes of power and citizenship.

China, Transregional

ARCH 3240

Spatial Concepts of Japan

Yoko Kawai
W 2:00 PM - 3:50 PM
Fall

The seminar explores the origins and developments of Japanese spatial concepts and surveys how they help form the contemporary architecture, ways of life, and cities of the country. Many Japanese spatial concepts, such as MA, are about creating time-space distances and relationship between objects, people, space, and experiences. These concepts go beyond the fabric of a built structure, and encompass architecture, landscape, and city. Each class is designed around one or two Japanese words that signify particular design concepts. Each week, a lecture on the word(s) with its design features, backgrounds, historical examples, and contemporary application is followed by student discussion. Contemporary works studied include those by Maki, Isozaki, Ando, Ito, SANAA, and Fujimoto. The urbanism and landscape of Tokyo and Kyoto are discussed. Students are required to make in-class presentations and write a final paper. 

Limited enrollment

Japan

ARCH 341, GLBL 253, LAST 318

Globalization Space

Keller Easterling
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Infrastructure space as a primary medium of change in global polity. Networks of trade, energy, communication, transportation, spatial products, finance, management, and labor, as well as new strains of political opportunity that reside within their spatial disposition. Case studies include free zones and automated ports around the world, satellite urbanism in South Asia, high-speed rail in Japan and the Middle East, agripoles in southern Spain, fiber optic submarine cable in East Africa, spatial products of tourism in North Korea, and management platforms of the International Organization for Standardization.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

CHNS 110

Elementary Modern Chinese I

Min Chen, Rongzhen Li, Yu-Lin Wang Saussy, Jianhua Shen, Yongtao Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Intended for students with no background in Chinese. An intensive course with emphasis on spoken language and drills. Pronunciation, grammatical analysis, conversation practice, and introduction to reading and writing Chinese characters.

Credit only on completion of CHNS 120b. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 112

Elementary Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Hsiu-hsien Chan
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

First level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with some aural proficiency but very limited ability in reading and writing Chinese. Training in listening and speaking, with emphasis on reading and writing.

Placement confirmed by placement test and by instructor. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 120

Elementary Modern Chinese II

Min Chen, Rongzhen Li, Yu-Lin Wang Saussy, Jianhua Shen, Yongtao Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 110.

After CHNS 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 122

Elementary Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Hsiu-hsien Chan
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 112.

China

CHNS 130

Intermediate Modern Chinese I

Ninghui Liang, Chuanmei Sun, Haiwen Wang, Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An intermediate course that continues intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and consolidates achievements from the first year of study. Students improve oral fluency, study more complex grammatical structures, and enlarge both reading and writing vocabulary.

After CHNS 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 132

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Fan Liu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM; 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate oral proficiency and elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them.

After CHNS 122 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 140

Intermediate Modern Chinese II

Ninghui Liang, Chuanmei Sun, Haiwen Wang, Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 130. To be followed by CHNS 150.

After CHNS 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 142

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Fan Liu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 132.

After CHNS 132 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 150

Advanced Modern Chinese I

Rongzhen Li, Yu-Lin Wang Saussy, Jianhua Shen, Chuanmei Sun
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Third level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Use of audiovisual materials, oral presentations, skits, and longer and more frequent writing assignments to assimilate more sophisticated grammatical structures. Further introduction to a wide variety of written forms and styles. Use of both traditional and simplified forms of Chinese characters.

After CHNS 140 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 151

Advanced Modern Chinese II

Rongzhen Li, Yu-Lin Wang Saussy, Jianhua Shen, Chuanmei Sun
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 PM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 150.

After CHNS 150 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 152

Advanced Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Fan Liu, Haiwen Wang, Peisong Xu
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

The third level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate high to advanced low speaking and listening skills and with intermediate reading and writing skills. The goal of the course is to help students effectively expand their skills in reading and writing while concurrently addressing the need to improve their listening and oral skills in formal environments. The materials cover a variety of topics relating to Chinese culture, society and cultural differences, supplemented with authentic video materials.

After CHNS 142 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 153

Advanced Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Fan Liu, Haiwen Wang, Peisong Xu
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate to advanced oral proficiency and high elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them. 

After CHNS 152 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 154

Advanced Modern Chinese III

Ninghui Liang, William Zhou
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Fourth level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Readings in a wide range of subjects form the basis of discussion and other activities. Students consolidate their skills, especially speaking proficiency, at an advanced level. Materials use both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 151 or equivalent

China

CHNS 155

Upper Advanced Modern Chinese IV

Ninghui Liang, William Zhou
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM; 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 154.

After CHNS 154 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 162

Advanced Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers III

Wei Su
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills and with advanced low reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000–1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 153 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 163

Upper Advanced Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners IV

Wei Su
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Third level of the advanced learner sequence in Chinese. Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills (able to conduct conversations fluently) and with high intermediate reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000–1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 162 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 164

Chinese for Reading Contemporary Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Selected readings in Chinese fiction of the 1980s and 1990s. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 165

Readings in Modern Chinese Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Reading and discussion of modern short stories, most written prior to 1949. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 166

Chinese for Current Affairs

William Zhou
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM; T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a strong focus on speaking and writing skills in formal style. Current affairs and issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as news and blogs on the Internet, television, film, fine arts and so on.

China

CHNS 167

Chinese for Current Affairs

William Zhou
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM; 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a strong focus on speaking and writing skills in formal style. Current affairs and issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as news and blogs on the Internet, television, film, fine arts and so on.

China

CHNS 168

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Min Chen
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 169

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Min Chen
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 170

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Michael Hunter
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, CHNS 153, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 171

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 170.

After CHNS 170.

China

CHNS 172

Chinese for Scholarly Conversation

Yongtao Zhang
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

This course aims to bring students to advanced competence in all aspects of modern Chinese, and prepare students for advanced research or employment in a variety of China-related fields. Materials include readings on contemporary social, cultural, and political issues, which are written by prominent scholar writers in related fields. This level is suitable for students who have had four years of college Chinese prior to attending, or who have taken three years of an accelerated program meant for heritage speakers.

Prerequisite: CHNS 155, CHNS 162, placement results equivalent to L5, or permission of instructor.

China

CHNS 570

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Michael Hunter
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, 153, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 571

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
T, Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 570.

After CHNS 570 or equivalent.

China

EALL 200, CHNS 200, EAST 240, HUMS 270

The Chinese Tradition

Lucas Bender, Yongtao Zhang
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

An introduction to the literature, culture, and thought of premodern China, from the beginnings of the written record to the turn of the twentieth century. Close study of textual and visual primary sources, with attention to their historical and cultural backdrops.

Students enrolled in CHNS 200 join a weekly Mandarin-language discussion section. No knowledge of Chinese required for students enrolled in EALL 200. Students enrolled in CHNS 200 must have L5 proficiency in Mandarin or permission of the course instructor.

China

EALL 211, EAST 241, LITR 174, WGSS 405

Women and Literature in Traditional China

Kang-I Chang
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

A study of major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. The power of women’s writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; footbinding; notions of love and death; the aesthetics of illness; women and revolution; poetry clubs; the function of memory in women’s literature; problems of gender and genre. 

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese. Formerly CHNS 201.

China

EALL 212, PHIL 203

Ancient Chinese Thought

Michael Hunter
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

An introduction to the foundational works of ancient Chinese thought from the ruling ideologies of the earliest historical dynasties, through the Warring States masters, to the Qin and Han empires. Topics include Confucianism and Daoism, the role of the intellectual in ancient Chinese society, and the nature and performance of wisdom.

China

EALL 213, HUMS 292, PHIL 205, RLST 211

Philosophy, Religion, and Literature in Medieval China

Lucas Bender
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Exploration of the rich intellectual landscape of the Chinese middle ages, introducing students to seminal works of Chinese civilization and to the history of their debate and interpretation in the first millennium. No previous knowledge of China is assumed. Instead, the course serves as a focused introduction to Chinese philosophy, religion, and literature.

Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 255, EAST 252

Japanese Modernism

Seth Jacobowitz
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Japanese literature and art from the 1920s through the 1940s. The avant-garde and mass culture; popular genre fiction; the advent of new media technologies and techniques; effects of Japanese imperialism, militarism, and fascism on cultural production; experimental writers and artists and their resistance to, or complicity with, the state.

Japan

EALL 270, FILM 306

Anime and the Posthuman

Seth Jacobowitz
HTBA
Spring

Japanese anime and its conceptions of the posthuman condition made possible by advances in science and technology. The persistence of myth, archetype, and humanist philosophy.

Japan

EALL 281, FILM 304

Japanese Cinema and Its Others

Aaron Gerow
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM, Screenings W 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Fall

Critical inquiry into the myth of a homogeneous Japan through analysis of how Japanese film and media historically represents “others” of different races, ethnicities, nationalities, genders, and sexualities, including blacks, ethnic Koreans, Okinawans, Ainu, undocumented immigrants, LGBT minorities, the disabled, youth, and monstrous others like ghosts. 

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 286, EAST 261, HUMS 290, LITR 285, PORT 360

The Modern Novel in Brazil and Japan

Seth Jacobowitz
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Brazilian and Japanese novels from the late nineteenth century to the present. Representative texts from major authors are read in pairs to explore their commonalities and divergences. Topics include nineteenth-century realism and naturalism, the rise of mass culture and the avant-garde, and existentialism and postmodernism.

No knowledge of Portuguese or Japanese required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan, Transregional

EALL 300, EAST 340

Sinological Methods

Pauline Lin
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A research course in Chinese studies, designed for students with background in modern and literary Chinese. Exploration and evaluation of the wealth of primary sources and research tools available in Chinese. For native speakers of Chinese, introduction to the secondary literature in English and instruction in writing professionally in English on topics about China. Topics include the compilation and development of Chinese bibliographies; bibliophiles’ notes; editions, censorship, and textual variation and reliability; specialized dictionaries; maps and geographical gazetteers; genealogies and biographical sources; archaeological and visual materials; and major Chinese encyclopedias and compendia. 

After CHNS 171 or equivalent. Formerly CHNS 202. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 301

Ancient and Medieval Chinese Poetry

Lucas Bender
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Readings in ancient and middle-period Chinese poetry, from the beginnings of the tradition through the Song dynasty. 

Prerequisite: one year of classical/literary Chinese or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Permission of the instructor is required.

China

EALL 303

Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Study of successive appropriations and reorientation of Chinese poetic forms in the major genres, such as song lyric (ci) and vernacular lyric (qu) traditions, traced from early foundations to those written in later times. Topics include the creation of cultural values and identities, problems of authorship and authority, exile and poetic writing, reception, and material culture.

Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. After CHNS 171 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Formerly CHNS 303. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 308, HUMS 305, PHIL 410

Sages of the Ancient World

Michael Hunter
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Comparative survey of the embodiment and performance of wisdom by ancient sages. Distinctive features and common themes in discourses about wisdom from China, India, the Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Topics include teaching, scheming, and dying.

China, Transregional, South Asia

EALL 325

Chinese Poetic Form, 1490-1990

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Development of the classical Chinese poetic form by modern Chinese poets. The appeal and aesthetic concept of the classical form since the revivalist movement of the late fifteenth century. Emphasis on close critical reading, with attention to cultural and political contexts.

Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. Prerequisite: a literary Chinese course or permission of instructor. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 511, EAST 541

Women and Literature in Traditional China

Kang-I Chang
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

This course focuses on major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. Topics include the power of women’s writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; the cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; foot binding and its implications; women’s notion of love and death; the aesthetic of illness; women and revolution; women’s poetry clubs; the function of memory in women’s literature; problems of gender and genre.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese.

China

EALL 512

Ancient Chinese Thought

Michael Hunter
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

An introduction to the foundational works of ancient Chinese thought from the ruling ideologies of the earliest historical dynasties, through the Warring States masters, to the Qin and Han empires. Topics include Confucianism and Daoism, the role of the intellectual in ancient Chinese society, and the nature and performance of wisdom. This is primarily an undergraduate course; graduate students are provided readings in the original language and meet in an additional session to review translations.

China

EALL 513

Philosophy, Religion, and Literature in Medieval China

Lucas Bender
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

This course explores the rich intellectual landscape of the Chinese middle ages, introducing students to seminal works of Chinese civilization and to the history of their debate and interpretation in the first millennium. No previous knowledge of China is assumed. This is primarily an undergraduate course; graduate students are provided readings in the original language and meet in an additional session to review translations.

China

EALL 555

Japanese Modernism

Seth Jacobowitz
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Japanese literature and art from the 1920s through the 1940s. The avant-garde and mass culture; popular genre fiction; the advent of new media technologies and tech­niques; effects of Japanese imperialism, militarism, and fascism on cultural production; experimental writers and artists and their resistance to, or complicity with, the state.

Japan

EALL 581, FILM 873

Japanese Cinema and Its Others

Aaron Gerow
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM, Screenings W 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Fall

A critical inquiry into the myth of a homogeneous Japan through analyzing how Japanese film and media historically represent “others” of different races, ethnicities, nationalities, genders, and sexualities, including blacks, ethnic Koreans, Okinawans, Ainu, undocumented immigrants, LGBT minorities, the disabled, youth, and “monstrous” others like ghosts.

Japan

EALL 586, CPLT 952, EAST 561

Modern Novel in Japan and Brazil

Seth Jacobowitz
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Brazilian and Japanese novels from the late nineteenth century to the present. Representative texts from major authors are read in pairs to explore their commonalities and divergences. Topics include nineteenth-century realism and naturalism, the rise of mass culture and the avant-garde, and existentialism and postmodernism.

Japan, Transregional

EALL 600, EAST 640

Sinological Methods

Pauline Lin
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A research course in Chinese studies, designed for students with background in modern and literary Chinese. Exploration and evaluation of the wealth of primary sources and research tools available in Chinese. For native speakers of Chinese, introduction to the secondary literature in English and instruction in writing professionally in English on topics about China. Topics include the compilation and development of Chinese bibli­ographies; bibliophiles’ notes; editions, censorship, and textual variation and reliability; specialized dictionaries; maps and geographical gazetteers; genealogies and biographi­cal sources; archaeological and visual materials; and major Chinese encyclopedias and compendia.

China

EALL 601

Ancient and Medieval Chinese Poetry

Lucas Bender
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Readings in ancient and middle-period Chinese poetry, from the beginnings of the tradition through the Song dynasty.

Prerequisite: one year of classical/literary Chinese or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

China

EALL 603

Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Study of successive appropriations and reorientation of Chinese poetic forms in the major genres, such as song lyric (ci) and vernacular lyric (qu) traditions, traced from early foundations to those written in later times. Topics include the creation of cultural values and identities, problems of authorship and authority, exile and poetic writing, reception, and material culture.

Readings in Chinese; discussion in English.

China

EALL 608

Sages of the Ancient World

Michael Hunter
T, Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Comparative survey of the embodiment and performance of wisdom by ancient sages. Distinctive features and common themes in discourses about wisdom from China, India, the Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Topics include teaching, scheming, and dying.

China, Transregional

EALL 618

The Dream of the Red Chamber

Tina Lu
HTBA
Spring

Close reading of the eighteenth-century Chinese novel The Dream of the Red Chamber in the original, with focus on nineteenth-century commentaries, historical context, and secondary materials. 

Prerequisite: knowledge of Chinese.

China

EALL 625

Chinese Poetic Form, 1490-1990

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

What is the appeal and the aesthetic concept of the Classical Chinese poetic form, which began in classical antiquity and continued to serve as a primary medium for poetic expression in modern times? How did modern writers express their “new” voices by using this “old” form? The seminar traces the “modern” development of Chinese classical poetry from the Revivalist (fugu) movement of the Ming to contemporary China in Shanghai. Emphasis on critical close reading, with attention to cultural and political contexts. Baihua translations and notes are provided for most of the poems.

Primary readings in Chinese, discussion in English.

China

EALL 705, HIST 875

The Tang Dynasty

Lucas Bender, Valerie Hansen
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

A survey of genres from the Tang Dynasty: the dynastic histories, other chronicles, literati notes, collected papers, chuanqi fiction, transformation texts, and poetry. In addition to frequent translation exercises, students do research projects that cross the usual disciplinary lines dividing history and literature.

China

EALL 715

Readings in Modern Japanese Literature

Seth Jacobowitz
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Readings from a selection of representative texts from modern to contemporary Japanese literature with a focus on comprehension, translation, critical reception, and close reading. Students have the opportunity to select a few texts of interest in consultation with the instructor.

Japan

EALL 740

Topics in Early Chinese Literature

Michael Hunter
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

An examination of key texts and problems in the study of early Chinese literature. Primary sources vary from year to year but could include the Shijing, Chuci, Shiji, early sources of anecdotal literature, and the fu

Discussions and papers are in English. This course may be repeated for credit.

China

EALL 806, EAST 806, FILM 921

Research in Japanese Film History

Aaron Gerow
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This seminar covers the methods and problems of researching and writing Japanese film history. We review the theoretical issues involved in historiography in general and film historiography in particular, and then consider how these are pertinent to the study of Japanese cinema history. Our approach is critical, as we examine several recent examples of Japanese film historiography, as well as practical, as we explore various methods and strategies for researching Japanese film history. We particularly focus on the Japanese cinema’s historical relation to the nation, especially in terms of how cinema may help us historicize the nation, and vice versa. Students develop their own research project using the unique collections at Yale. 

Knowledge of Japanese is helpful but not essential.

Japan

EALL 873, EAST 573, HIST 873

China and the World in the Twentieth Century

Peter C. Perdue, Jing Tsu
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Reading and discussion of significant themes in China and world history in the first decade of the twentieth century. We concentrate on topics that contain international, transnational, and comparative implications, and include discussion of literary and historical material. Most readings are in English, but selected primary sources in Asian languages may be used. Open to all History, East Asian Studies, and East Asian Languages and Literatures students, and others by request. Includes research paper and weekly writing exercises.

Prerequisite: knowledge of one foreign language, European or Asian.

China

EAST 401, HIST 301J

The Two Koreas

Russell Burge
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This seminar examines debates in the history of modern Korea, beginning with the Chosŏn Dynasty and building to the division of the country into North and South Korea. Major themes include the nature of modernity and modernization, the history of imperialism and colonialism in East Asia, the emergence of Korean nationalism, the rise of the Cold War order and the outbreak of the Korean War, histories of guerilla warfare and popular resistance, and histories of gender, sexuality, and self-expression in Korea throughout the twentieth century.

Permission of instructor required.

Korea

EAST 402, HIST 305J

Empire and Identity in Qing China

David Porter
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This seminar covers the history of the Qing empire, which governed China and large parts of Inner Asia from 1644 to 1912, with a thematic focus on a key question: how did the politics of identity manifest in a society organized under a governmental structure and set of intellectual assumptions very different from those we are familiar with today? The course examines the roles of identity categories like ethnicity, gender, sexuality, religion, and status in the Qing empire and interrogates the role of the Qing imperial system, as a particular political system, in managing different forms of identity. In addition to its core focus on the Qing, the course includes discussions of Chosŏn Korea and the Republic of China, to consider both the role of Qing empire in regional politics and the legacy of empire in China’s later history.

Permission of instructor required.

China

EAST 403, HIST 315J

Law and Gender in the Japanese Empire

Jooyeon Hahm
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

This course examines how the Japanese Empire mobilized its legal frameworks and institutions to transform family relations, gender norms, and sexual behaviors in the societies that it engulfed. We explore these complex processes through which contradictory ideas and practices collided and intersected. Some traditions survived, while others were invented. Japan was in charge, but the colonies and their diverse populations influenced Japanese views. In the first half of the semester, we study Japanese family law as a malleable instrument for imperial governance and an interactive space of negotiation and contestation in the colonies. The second half is devoted to probing Japanese efforts to criminalize abortion, regulate reproduction, control diseases, “cure” disabilities, and study and fashion the body. In each session, we analyze the category of gender as integral to our discussions of empire, nation, culture, and war.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 404, HIST 307J

The Written Word in Japan, Prehistory to 1600

Paula R. Curtis
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

In premodern Japan, text and writing had the power to imbue swords with ritual meaning, evoke the pathos of cherry blossoms, or reveal means of salvation. People from all walks of life produced and consumed the written word in different ways, whether they hoped to shape military regimes or simply send messages to loved ones, as we might today. In what ways did textuality (or, in some cases, its absence or conscious rejection) shape Japan’s social, political, economic, and religious development? What is a “text”? How does understanding its use by diverse peoples across centuries challenge our underlying assumptions about how documents, writing, and communication function in society? Surveying these issues from prehistory to 1600, this course uses writing traditions and documentary culture as a lens through which to understand Japanese history and ways of being in Japan’s premodern world. Students use primary and secondary readings to discuss core issues in writing and textual culture, such as language, orality, transmission, translation, gender, genre, communication, and visuality. A complementary emphasis on how we, as modern readers, writers, and scholars, interpret and use written materials further provides students with new strategies for thinking about how history is recorded, consumed, and evaluated.

No previous knowledge of Japanese or Japanese history is required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EAST 405, RLST 363

Neo-Confucianism in Korea

Jeongsoo Shin
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

This course is an overview of Korean Neo-Confucianism, a reformed form of traditional Confucianism, which constitutes a core part of Korean history. It was a driving force in the development and refinement of Korean thought and culture and, even today, remains influential in society. Historically, it is undeniable that Neo-Confucianism was an ideology used to solidify social status, suppressing commoners and women in pre-modern Korea. It is also blamed for nepotism and other corrupt practices. However, it has recently been reinterpreted as a major factor for the rapid adoption of modernization. In this course, we consider all negative and positive aspects of the tradition from theoretical, historical, thematic, and comparative perspectives. Students explore theoretical aspects of Neo-Confucianism, especially as they relate to cosmology, human nature, and its encounter with other religions. After delving into its theoretical foundation, students deal with thematic issues, such as women and gender, ideology, ecology, education, and others. Students are given an array of readings, ranging from philosophical and religious documents, diaries, and letters, to important recent scholarly works in the field, as well as visual sources to help foster a comprehensive understanding.

No prior knowledge is required of Confucianism and Korean culture. Permission of instructor required.

Korea

EAST 406, ANTH 241

Nature and Culture in and of East Asia

Tomonori Sugimoto
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

How is nature in East Asia shaped by distinct histories of modernization, colonialism, militarism, the Cold War, and developmentalism in the region? What is the impact of transnational flows of objects, people, ideas, and discourses—whether they are natural resources, waste, environmental activists, or green urbanism—on nature? How do recent anxieties about adulterated food, radiation, and pollution reveal environmental interconnections among Japan, China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Korea, and beyond? Why are marginalized groups like Okinawans, indigenous people, and rural poor peasants disproportionately affected by environmental problems? By addressing such questions, this course aims to unpack the relationship between nature, culture, and power in East Asia. Reading interdisciplinary accounts from history, anthropology, and literary and cultural studies, we engage the growing field of environmental humanities from a uniquely East Asian perspective. Topics include the relationship between East Asian colonial experience and nature; state power and water resources; air pollution; nuclear radiation; the emergence of environmental conservation discourse; interspecies connections; and food safety.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 491

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 492

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 505

Neo-Confucianism in Korea

Jeongsoo Shin
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

This course is an overview of Korean Neo-Confucianism, a reformed form of traditional Confucianism, which constitutes a core part of Korean history. It was a driving force in the development and refinement of Korean thought and culture and, even today, remains influential in society. Historically, it is undeniable that Neo-Confucianism was an ideology used to solidify social status, suppressing commoners and women in pre-modern Korea. It is also blamed for nepotism and other corrupt practices. However, it has recently been reinterpreted as a major factor for the rapid adoption of modernization. In this course, we consider all negative and positive aspects of the tradition from theoretical, historical, thematic, and comparative perspectives. Students explore theoretical aspects of Neo-Confucianism, especially as they relate to cosmology, human nature, and its encounter with other religions. After delving into its theoretical foundation, students deal with thematic issues, such as women and gender, ideology, ecology, education, and others. Students are given an array of readings, ranging from philosophical and religious documents, diaries, and letters, to important recent scholarly works in the field, as well as visual sources to help foster a comprehensive understanding.

No prior knowledge is required of Confucianism and Korean culture.

Korea

EAST 900

Master’s Thesis

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 900

Master's Thesis

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 910

Independent Study

By arrangement with faculty and with approval of the DGS.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 910

Independent Study

By arrangement with faculty and with approval of the DGS.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

ENGL 369, AMST 374, EAST 369

Cultures of Militarism in Asia and the Pacific

Sunny Xiang
T, Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

This seminar explores the diverse cultural manifestations of war, empire, and militarism in Asia and the Pacific during the long Cold War (roughly the 1940s-1980s). A portion of the course is devoted to iconic literary and cultural figures who came to prominence through cultures of militarism (e.g., Jade Snow Wong, James Michener, C.Y. Lee, Richard Mason, Epeli Hau’ofa). We consider important genres privileged by cultural imperialism and soft power (e.g., autobiography, travel writing). We also read more faddish and less canonical writers (e.g., Kim Yong Ik, Induk Pahk, Janice Mirikitani, Maria Yen) and engage stranger and more ephemeral cultural objects (e.g., advertisements, fashion magazines, tourist guidebooks). Important topics for the course include refugee migration, the model minority, global education reform, and the belated resurgence of reparation movements. We conclude the semester by examining the Asian American Movement of the 1960s and the publication of Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior in 1975.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

GLBL 312, EAST 454, ECON 474

Economic and Policy Lessons from Japan

Stephen Roach
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

An evaluation of modern Japan’s protracted economic problems and of their potential implications for other economies, including the United States, Europe, and China. Policy blunders, structural growth impediments, bubbles, the global economic crisis of 2008, and Abenomics; risks of secular stagnation and related dangers to the global economy from subpar post-crisis recoveries. Focus on policy remedies to avert similar problems in other countries.

Prerequisite: a course in macroeconomics. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

GLBL 318, EAST 338, ECON 338

The Next China

Stephen Roach
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Economic development in China since the late 1970s. Emphasis on factors pushing China toward a transition from its modern export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. The possibility of a resulting identity crisis, underscored by China’s need to embrace political reform and by the West’s long-standing misperceptions of China.

Prerequisite: introductory macroeconomics.

China

GLBL 355

The United States, China, and the Origins of the Korean Peninsula Crisis

David Rank
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This course looks at the current situation on the Korean Peninsula and the interaction of the major players there through historical and diplomatic practitioners’ perspectives. The strategic interests of major powers intersect on the Korean Peninsula to a degree found in few other places on earth. In a part of the globe China long viewed as within its sphere of influence, four nuclear powers now rub shoulders and the United States maintains a military presence. With the Armistice that ended the Korean War still in place, Northeast Asia is the Cold War’s last front, but today’s nuclear crisis makes it more than a historical curiosity. Drawing on original diplomatic documents and other source materials, as well as first-hand experience of current-day diplomats, this course considers the trajectory of the two Korea’s relationships with the United States and China and their role in the international politics of East Asia.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Korea, Transregional

GLBL 376

Asia Now: Human Rights, Globalization, Cultural Conflicts

Jing Tsu
Th 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

This course examines contemporary and global issues in Asia (east, southeast, northeast, south), in a historical and interdisciplinary context, that include international law, policy debates, cultural issues, security, military history, media, science and technology, and cyber warfare. Course is co-taught with a guest professor. 

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia

GLBL 552

Asia Now: Human Rights, Globalization, Cultural Conflicts

Jing Tsu
Th 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

This course examines contemporary and global issues in Asia (east, southeast, northeast, south), in a historical and interdisciplinary context that includes international law, policy debates, cultural issues, security, military history, media, science and technology, and cyber warfare.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia

GLBL 616

China’s Rise and the Future of Foreign Policy

David Rank
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

China’s return to its traditional role as a regional—and, increasingly, global—power has implications for the political, security, and economic structures that have been the foundation of the international system since the end of the Second World War. This course looks at the impact China’s ascent has had, the challenges a rising China will pose for policy makers in the years ahead, and the internal issues China will need to address in the years ahead. It does so from the perspective of a practitioner who spent nearly three decades working on U.S. foreign policy and U.S.-China relations.

China

GLBL 618, MGT 911

The Next China

Stephen Roach
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Born out of necessity in the post-Cultural Revolution chaos of the late 1970s, modern China is about reforms, opening up, and transition. The Next China will be driven by the transition from an export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. China’s new model could unmask a dual identity crisis—underscored by China’s need to embrace political reform and the West’s long-standing misperceptions about China. 

Prerequisite: basic undergraduate macroeconomics.

China

HIST 101

The World Circa 1000

Valerie Hansen, Anders Winroth
T, Th 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Fall

A study of the world’s major societies and the encounters among them circa 1000, when globalization began. Attention to China, India, Europe, the Vikings, Africa, the Islamic world, Amerindians including the Maya. Analysis of written and archaeological sources.

China, Transregional, South Asia

HIST 216J

Eurasian Encounters before 1500

Paul Freedman
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

People who traveled between Europe and Asia during the Middle Ages. Focus on the Franciscan missionary William Rubruck, Admiral Zheng He’s interpreter Ma Huan, the Arabic diplomat ibn Fadlan, and the merchant and fabulist Marco Polo.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional, South Asia

HIST 303

Japan's Modern Revolution

Daniel Botsman
HTBA
Spring

A survey of Japan’s transformation over the course of the nineteenth century from an isolated, traditional society on the edge of northeast Asia to a modern imperial power. Aspects of political, social, and cultural history.

Japan

HIST 303J, EAST 303

Hong Kong and China: A Cross-Border History

Denise Ho
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This departmental seminar studies the historical development of Hong Kong and China in relation to each other, from the colonial and late imperial experience to their shared histories in national and political movements, from postwar industrialization to reform-era economic growth, culminating in the 1997 handover and its attendant political and economic integration. The readings from the first half of the semester come primarily from the literature in history, while the readings in the second half draw from anthropology, economics, political science, and sociology. Each week readings include primary sources in or translated into English.

Permission of instructor required.

China

HIST 307, EAST 301

The Making of Japan's Great Peace, 1550-1850

Fabian Drixler
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Examination of how, after centuries of war in Japan and overseas, the Tokugawa shogunate built a peace that lasted more than 200 years. Japan’s urban revolution, the eradication of Christianity, the Japanese discovery of Europe, and the question whether Tokugawa Japan is a rare example of a complex and populous society that achieved ecological sustainability.

Japan

HIST 309J, EAST 309

Uses of the Past in Modern China

Denise Ho
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Modern China’s use of the past in state-sponsored narratives of nation, in attempts to construct heritage by elites and intellectuals, and in grassroots projects of remembrance. Theories on history and memory; primary sources in English translation; case studies from twentieth-century China. Interdisciplinary readings in art history, anthropology, cultural studies, and history.

Permission of instructor required.

China

HIST 321, EAST 220

China from Present to Past, 2015-600

Valerie Hansen
T, Th 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Spring

Underlying causes of current issues facing China traced back to their origins in the premodern period. Topics include economic development, corruption, environmental crises, gender, and Pacific island disputes. Selected primary-source readings in English, images, videos, and Web resources.

Optional additional Chinese-language and English-language sections.

China

HIST 326J, EAST 326

Yale and Japan

Daniel Botsman
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Exploration of Yale’s rich historical connections to Japan. Focus on use of the University’s museum and library collections to learn about various aspects of the Japanese past, from ancient times to the post-World War II era.

Knowledge of Japanese helpful but not required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

HIST 375, EAST 375

China from Mao to Now

Denise Ho
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

The history of the People’s Republic of China from Mao to now, with a focus on understanding the recent Chinese past and framing contemporary events in China in historical context. How the party-state is organized; interactions between state and society; causes and consequences of economic disparities; ways in which various groups—from intellectuals to religious believers—have shaped the meaning of contemporary Chinese society.

China

HIST 884

Readings in the History of Modern Japan

Daniel Botsman
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This course offers students an opportunity to explore recent English-language scholarship on the history of modern Japan (post-1868).

Japan

HIST 892

China at Its Borders

Denise Ho
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This reading seminar examines recent English-language scholarship on China’s engagement with the world, focusing on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Weekly topics include the following themes: frontiers and borders, the region as a unit of analysis, trading systems and regulation, migration and diaspora, models of modernity and revolution, World War II and the Cold War, socialist internationalism, the era of reform and opening, and China’s global ambitions today.

China

HSAR 016, EAST 016

Chinese Painting and Culture

Quincy Ngan
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

This course focuses on important works of Chinese painting and major painters from the fourth century CE to the twentieth century. Through close readings of the pictorial contents and production contexts of such works of art, this course investigates the works’ formats, meanings, and innovations from social, historical, and art-historical perspectives. In this course, students become familiar with the traditional Chinese world and acquire the knowledge necessary to be an informed viewer of Chinese painting. Discussions of religion, folkloric beliefs, literature, relationships between men and women, the worship of mountains, the laments of scholars, and the tastes of emperors and wealthy merchants also allow students to understand the cultural roots of contemporary China.

Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program. Permission of instructor required.

China

HSAR 143, RLST 188, SAST 260

Introduction to the History of Art: Buddhist Art and Architecture, 900 to 1600

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
T, Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

Buddhist art and architecture of East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Tibet from the tenth century to the early modern period. Emphasis on cross-regional engagements including the impact of Islam.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Tibet

HSAR 237, EAST 237

Arts of China

Quincy Ngan
T, Th 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Spring

Arts of China is a window to the nation’s history, culture, society, and aesthetics. This course introduces the visual arts of China from the prehistoric period to the twentieth century. We look at the archaeological findings (including pottery, jade, and bronze vessels) as well as ancestor worship and belief in posthumous souls and immortal mountains. We look at the art and architecture inspired by Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism. We investigate the place of Chinese painting and calligraphy in court and elite cultures and explore how these arts intertwine with politics, printing culture, and popular culture. Lastly, we investigate the decorative arts, like ceramics, textiles, and furniture, as well as the art and architecture that reflect foreign tastes.

China

HSAR 469, EAST 469

Contemporary Art and Culture in China

Quincy Ngan
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

This course is an introduction to the art and culture of contemporary China, covering the period from 1960s to the present day. It focuses on art objects, performances, propaganda, and exhibitions produced by the government, the business sector, curators, and avant-garde artists in Mainland China. We also look at China’s Olympic stadiums, the Three Gorges Dam, and skyscrapers (including those in Hong Kong and Taiwan). Class meetings discuss the required readings and investigate artworks, films, and events that speak to China’s political ideologies, society, and economy, as well as its role in globalization and international conflicts. To establish a cross-cultural interpretation, this class also explores how Euro-American artists and filmmakers used their arts to express their views on contemporary China. 

Permission of instructor required.

China

HSAR 484, EAST 474

Japanese Screens

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

The screen-painting tradition in Japan, particularly as it emerged in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The format, techniques, and functions of screen painting; poetic and literary connections, as well as studio practices and politics, of the principal lineages of painters; aesthetics and styles associated with varying classes of patronage, from the shoguns to Buddhist monks to the Japanese court.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

HSAR 531, EAST 531

Contemporary Chinese Art: Issues and Narratives

Quincy Ngan
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This seminar seeks to parse the development of contemporary Chinese art from multiple perspectives, situating major artworks, artists’ statements, and exhibitions from the 1960s onward in a complex network composed of domestic events, the global art market, and individual curators. Required readings provide interpretation frameworks for studying art objects, performances, propaganda, and exhibitions produced by the government, the business sector, curators, and avant-garde artists in Mainland China. Class discussion aims to identify historiographical lacunae and methodology for advancing the research on contemporary Chinese art. Topics addressed include the Cultural Revolution, underground art groups, academic art, ’85 new wave, apartment art, experimental art, site-specificity, identity, feminism, exhibition space, biennale, and local/global.

China

HSAR 815

Momoyama Art in World Perspective

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Exploration of art practices in the time of Nobunaga and Hideyoshi, with emphasis on cross-cultural entanglements in the sixteenth century and the optics of the bizarre at the threshold of the early modern world. Coverage includes castle architecture and decoration, the intersection of European and Japanese pictorial modes and painting practices, Christian art in Japan, the tea ceremony and wabi taste, genre painting such as map screens and city views, and the oceanic motif in visual cultures of the early modern period.

Japan

JAPN 110

Elementary Japanese I

Kumiko Nakamura, Mari Stever, Mika Yamaguchi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Introductory language course for students with no previous background in Japanese. Development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, including 50 hiragana, 50 katakana, and 75 kanji characters. Introduction to cultural aspects such as levels of politeness and group concepts. In-class drills in pronunciation and conversation. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

Credit only on completion of JAPN 120. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 120

Elementary Japanese II

Kumiko Nakamura, Mari Stever, Mika Yamaguchi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 110, with supplementary materials such as excerpts from television shows, anime, and songs. Introduction of 150 additional kanji.

After JAPN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 130

Intermediate Japanese I

Hiroyo Nishimura
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Continued development in both written and spoken Japanese. Aspects of Japanese culture, such as history, art, religion, and cuisine, explored through text, film, and animation. Online audio and visual aids facilitate listening, as well as the learning of grammar and kanji. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 140

Intermediate Japanese II

Hiroyo Nishimura
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 130.

After JAPN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 150

Advanced Japanese I

Kumiko Nakamura, Mari Stever
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM, 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

Advanced language course that further develops proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Reading and discussion materials include works by Nobel Prize winners. Japanese anime and television dramas are used to enhance listening and to develop skills in culturally appropriate speech. Writing of essays, letters, and criticism solidifies grammar and style. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 140 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 151

Advanced Japanese II

Mari Stever, Mika Yamaguchi
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM; 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 150.

After JAPN 150 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 156

Advanced Japanese III

Hiroyo Nishimura
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Close reading of modern Japanese writing on current affairs, social science, history, and literature. Development of speaking and writing skills in academic settings, including formal speeches, interviews, discussions, letters, e-mail, and expository writing. Interviews of and discussions with native speakers on current issues. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 157

Advanced Japanese IV

Kumiko Nakamura
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 156.

After JAPN 156 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 170

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Adam Haliburton
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 171

Readings in Literary Japanese

Nina Farizova
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Close analytical reading of a selection of texts from the Nara through the Tokugawa periods: prose, poetry, and various genres. Introduction to kanbun.

After JAPN 170 or equivalent. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

JAPN 570

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Adam Haliburton
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 571

Readings in Literary Japanese

Nina Farizova
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Close analytical reading of a selection of texts from the Nara through Tokugawa period: prose, poetry, and various genres. Introduction of kanbun.

After JAPN 570 or equivalent.

Japan

KREN 110

Elementary Korean I

Angela Lee-Smith, Hyun Sung Lim
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

A beginning course in modern Korean. Pronunciation, lectures on grammar, conversation practice, and introduction to the writing system (Hankul).

Credit only on completion of KREN 120. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 120

Elementary Korean II

Seungja Choi, Hyun Sung Lim
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 110.

After KREN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 130

Intermediate Korean I

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Continued development of skills in modern Korean, spoken and written, leading to intermediate-level proficiency.

After KREN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 132

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners I

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Intended for students with some oral proficiency but little or no training in Hankul. Focus on grammatical analysis, the standard spoken language, and intensive training in reading and writing.

This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 140

Intermediate Korean II

Hyun Sung Lim
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 130.

After KREN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 142

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 132.

After KREN 132 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 150

Advanced Korean I: Korean Language and Culture through K-Pop Music

Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

An advanced language course with emphasis on developing vocabulary and grammar, practice reading comprehension, speaking on a variety of topics, and writing in both formal and informal styles. Use storytelling, discussion, peer group activities, audio and written journals, oral presentations, and supplemental audiovisual materials and texts in class. Intended for nonheritage speakers.

Korea

KREN 151

Advanced Korean II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 150a.

Prerequisite: KREN 150a or equivalent. This course meets during Reading Period.

Korea

KREN 152

Advanced Korean for Advanced Learners

Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An advanced course in modern Korean. Reading of short stories, essays, and journal articles, and introduction of 200 Chinese characters. Students develop their speaking and writing skills through discussions and written exercises.

After KREN 142 or 151, or with permission of instructor.

Korea

KREN 154

Advanced Korean III

Seungja Choi
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

An advanced language course designed to develop reading and writing skills using Web-based texts in a variety of genres. Students read texts independently and complete comprehension and vocabulary exercises through the Web. Discussions, tests, and intensive writing training in class.

After KREN 151 or equivalent.

Korea

LAW 20670

Chinese Law and Society

Taisu Zhang
M 10:10 AM - 12:00 PM
Fall

This course will survey law and legal practice in the People’s Republic of China. Particular attention is given to the interaction of legal institutions with politics, social change, and economic development. Specific topics include, among others, the Party State, the nature of political legitimacy in contemporary Chinese society, state capitalism, the judiciary, property law and development, business and investment law, criminal law and procedure, media (especially the Internet), and major schools of Chinese legal and political thought. Prior familiarity with Chinese history or politics is unnecessary but helpful. 

All course materials will be in English. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen.

China

LAW 21179, GLBL 624

Contemporary China Research Seminar

Jamie P. Horsley, Robert D. Williams
W 3:10 PM - 5:00 PM
Spring

Research and writing on contemporary problems related to China, including but not limited to legal issues. The class meets roughly six times during the term to discuss particular China-related issues (occasionally with a guest) and at the end of the term for student presentations of their research. The remainder of the term, students work on their research and writing projects and individually meet with the instructors to discuss their work. 

Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. Permission of the instructors required. Prerequisite (non-Law students): in addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a statement of interest explaining their background related to China and research ideas they are considering no later than 4:30 p.m. on October 29, 2019. Decisions on admission to the class will be made primarily on the basis of the statements.

China

PLSC 162

Japan and the World

The historical development of Japan’s international relations since the late Tokugawa period; World War II and its legacy; domestic institutions and foreign policy; implications for the United States; and interactions between nationalism and regionalism.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

PLSC 678

Japan and the World

The historical development of Japan’s international relations since the late Tokugawa period; World War II and its legacy; domestic institutions and foreign policy; implications for the United States; and interactions between nationalism and regionalism.

Japan

REL 616

Introduction to East Asian Theologies

Chloe Starr
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This course introduces a range of theological themes and key thinkers in twentieth- and twenty-first century Japan, Taiwan, and Korea. It surveys different theological movements within these countries (such as “homeland theology,” Minjung theology, the “no-church” movement, etc.) and encourages a critical response to the challenges that these theologies raise for Christians in Asia and elsewhere. The course considers contextualization and inculturation debates in each of these societies, as well as regional responses to Christianity. We read primary texts in English, with background reading for context, and students are encouraged to develop their own responses to the authors and their thought (e.g., students may submit theological reflections to count toward their grade).

Japan, Korea, Transregional, Taiwan

REL 940

The Chinese Theologians

Chloe Starr
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This course examines select readings from Chinese church and academic theologians (including Hong Kong writers and diaspora voices) to explore the nature of Chinese Christian thought. The readings cover late imperial Roman Catholic writers, early republican Protestant thinkers, high communist-era church theologians, and contemporary Sino-Christian academic theologians. Students read primary materials in English, supplemented by background studies and lecture material to help make sense of the theological constructions that emerge. The course encourages reflection on the challenges for Christian mission in a communist context, on the tensions between church and state in the production of theologies, and on the challenges that Chinese Christianity poses for global Christian thought.

China

REL 983

China Mission

Chloe Starr
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

The Day Missions Collection at YDS is the strongest mission collection in the world, comprising about one third of the Divinity Library’s 500,000 volumes—and it is also the central repository in the United States for China-related mission papers. This course offers students the opportunity to complete an original research project in the library relating to mission in China, utilizing manuscript, microform, and monograph materials from the collections. For the first six weeks, students read intensively in mission history, theory, and practice, schematized through mission narratives. The next four weeks are “library lab” time: supervised reading time in special collection and archive materials within the library; reading into and developing projects while help is on hand for deciphering handwriting; providing reference tools for China, etc. The final two weeks are dedicated to research presentations and evaluation, with each student offering research findings to the class in any media chosen.

China

RLST 102, EAST 390

Atheism and Buddhism

Hwansoo Kim
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

A critical examination of atheism and religions (Buddhism), with a focus on intellectual, religious, philosophical, and scientific debates about God, the origin of the universe, morality, evolution, neuroscience, happiness, enlightenment, the afterlife, and karma. Readings selected from philosophical, scientific, and religious writings. Authors include some of the following: Charles Darwin, Bertrand Russell, Christopher Hitchins, Richard Dawkins, Deepak Chopra, Sam Harris, Owen Flanagan, Stephen Batchelor, and the Dalai Lama. 

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

RLST 121, EALL 296, EAST 391

Religion and Culture in Korea

Hwansoo Kim
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Introduction to Shamanism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Christianity, and new religions in Korea from ancient times to the present. Examination of religious traditions in close relationships with social, economic, political, and cultural environments in Korean society. Examination of religious tensions, philosophical arguments, and ethical issues that indigenous and foreign religions in Korea have engaged throughout history to maximize their influence in Korean society.  

Permission of instructor required.

Korea

RLST 130, EAST 130

Chinese Religion

Eric Greene
T,Th 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Fall

This class provides an introduction to traditional Chinese religions. We study popular Chinese religious practices, ancient and enduring Chinese schools of thought such as Confucianism and Daoism, the traditional Chinese state religion in which the emperor ruled as the “son of Heaven,” as well as Buddhism, which entered China at the dawn of the common era, and Christianity and Islam. The course is structured around certain key themes—cosmology, divination, the body, death, the family, and the sacred power of the Chinese state—as they have been handled in different Chinese religious systems across time. Given topics are explored through ancient, medieval, and modern examples side-by-side so as to appreciate the continuities that have persisted in Chinese religion over the past 3000 years as well as the diversity of the practices and beliefs that comprise Chinese religious life.

China

RLST 349, EAST 411

Religion in Japanese Literary Arts

Riley Soles
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This course explores the deep relationship between various religious orientations and the literary output of Japan, from the earliest forms of writing and inscription to more contemporary forms of digital media. While the course focuses on Buddhism, Shinto, and Daoism specifically, we also explore the interaction of Western religions with Japanese culture, as well as the development of uniquely hybrid and syncretic forms of practice and belief. We also attempt to interrogate our own Western predispositions in conceptualizing what counts as “religious,” “literary,” and even “Japanese.” While attempting to balance both depth and range, the course covers most major time periods and an array of literary genres.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

RLST 574

Chinese Buddhist Texts

Eric Greene
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Close reading of selected Chinese Buddhist texts in the original.

China

RUSS 025, EALL 025

Russian and Chinese Science Fiction

Jinyi Chu
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

What can we learn about Russian and Chinese cultures through their fantasies? How do Russian and Chinese writers and filmmakers respond to the global issues of animal ethics, artificial intelligence, space immigration, surveillance, gender and sexuality? How are Russian and Chinese visions of the future different from and similar to the western ones? This course explores these questions by examining 20th-21st century Russian and Chinese science fictions in their cultural, historical, and philosophical contexts. All readings and discussion in English. Sci-fi authors and translators will be invited to give guest lectures. 

Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration is required.

China, Transregional