CEAS Courses 2018-2019

This list is subject to modification.

Some of the information contained here may have changed since the time of publication. Always check with the department under which the course is listed or on Yale University Course Search to make sure that the courses you are interested in are still being offered and that the times have not changed.

If you have questions about any of the courses listed here, please contact the offering department directly.

ANTH 170, EAST 170

Chinese Culture, Society, and History

Caroline Merrifield
T,Th 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Anthropological explorations of basic institutions in traditional and contemporary Chinese society. Topics include kinship and marriage, religion and ritual, economy and social stratification, state culture, socialist revolution, and market reform.

China

ANTH 254

Japan: Culture, Society, Modernity

Sarah LeBaron von Baeyer
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Introduction to Japanese society and culture. The historical development of Japanese society; family, work, and education in contemporary Japan; Japanese aesthetics; and psychological, sociological, and cultural interpretations of Japanese behavior.

Japan

ANTH 362

Unity and Diversity in Chinese Culture

Helen Siu
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

An exploration of the Chinese identity as it has been reworked over the centuries. Major works in Chinese anthropology and their intellectual connections with general anthropology and historical studies. Topics include kinship and marriage, marketing systems, rituals and popular religion, ethnicity and state making, and the cultural nexus of power.

Permission of instructor required.

China

ANTH 397, ARCG 397

Archaeology of East Asia

Anne Underhill
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Introduction to the findings and practice of archaeology in China, Japan, Korea, and southeast Asia. Methods used by archaeologists to interpret social organization, economic organization, and ritual life. Attention to major transformations such as the initial peopling of an area, establishment of farming villages, the development of cities, interregional interactions, and the nature of political authority.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, Southeast Asia

ANTH 414, EAST 417

Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations; class, gender, ethnicity, and migration; and global landscapes of power and citizenship.

Permission of instructor required. This course meets during reading period.

China, Transregional

ANTH 531, ARCG 531, CLSS 815, EALL 773, HIST 502, HSAR 564, JDST 653, NELC 533, RLST 803

Sensory Experiences in Ancient Ritual

Carolyn Laferriere, Andrew Turner
Th 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

A comparative exploration of the role the senses played in the performance of ancient and premodern ritual, drawing from a range of ancient traditions including those of Greece, Rome, and Egypt, and from cultural traditions of the Near East, India, China, and the New World. Placing particular emphasis on the relationship between art and ritual, we discuss the methods available for reconstructing ancient sensory experience, how the ancient cultures conceived of the senses and perception, and how worshipers’ sensory experiences, whether visual, sonic, olfactory, gustatory, or haptic, were integral aspects in their engagement with the divine within religious ritual. This seminar incorporates material in the Yale Art Gallery.

China, Transregional, South Asia

ANTH 575, EAST 575

Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations, class, gender, ethnicity, migration, and global landscapes of power and citizenship.

China, Transregional

ANTH 797, ARCG 797

Archaeology of East Asia

Anne Underhill
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Introduction to the findings and practice of archaeology in China, Japan, Korea, and southeast Asia. Methods used by archaeologists to interpret social organization, economic organization, and ritual life. Attention to major transformations such as the initial peopling of an area, establishment of farming villages, the development of cities, interregional interactions, and the nature of political authority.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, Southeast Asia

ARCH 3265

Architecture and Urbanism of Modern Japan

Yoko Kawai
W 2:00 PM - 3:50 PM
Fall

This course examines how design philosophies and methodologies were developed in Japanese architecture during the 130-year period from the Meiji Restoration until the postmodern era. Special attention is paid to the process of urbanization through repeated destructions and the forming of cultural identity through mutual interactions with the West, both of which worked as major forces that shaped architectural developments. Highlighted architects include Chuta Ito, Goichi Takeda, Frank Lloyd Wright, Kameki Tsuchiura, Sutemi Horiguchi, Kunio Maekawa, Kenzo¯ Tange, Arata Isozaki, Fumihiko Maki, Kisho Kurokawa, Kazuo Shinohara, Tadao Ando, and Mirei Shigemori. Historical photos and excerpts from films are used to better understand context. Students are required to make in-class presentations and write a final paper.

Japan

ARCH 341, GLBL 253, LAST 318

Globalization Space

Keller Easterling
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Infrastructure space as a primary medium of change in global polity. Networks of trade, energy, communication, transportation, spatial products, finance, management, and labor, as well as new strains of political opportunity that reside within their spatial disposition. Case studies include free zones and automated ports around the world, satellite urbanism in South Asia, high-speed rail in Japan and the Middle East, agripoles in southern Spain, fiber optic submarine cable in East Africa, spatial products of tourism in North Korea, and management platforms of the International Organization for Standardization.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

CHNS 110

Elementary Modern Chinese I

Min Chen, Rongzhen Li, Yu-Lin Saussy, Jianhua Shen, Yongtao Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Intended for students with no background in Chinese. An intensive course with emphasis on spoken language and drills. Pronunciation, grammatical analysis, conversation practice, and introduction to reading and writing Chinese characters.

Credit only on completion of CHNS 120b. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 112

Elementary Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners I

Hsiu-hsien Chan
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

First level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with some aural proficiency but very limited ability in reading and writing Chinese. Training in listening and speaking, with emphasis on reading and writing.

Placement confirmed by placement test and by instructor. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 120

Elementary Modern Chinese II

Min Chen, Rongzhen Li, Yu-Lin Saussy, Jianhua Shen, Yongtao Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 110.

After CHNS 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 122

Elementary Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners II

Hsiu-hsien Chan
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 112.

China

CHNS 130

Intermediate Modern Chinese I

Ninghui Liang, Chuanmei Sun, Haiwen Wang, Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An intermediate course that continues intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and consolidates achievements from the first year of study. Students improve oral fluency, study more complex grammatical structures, and enlarge both reading and writing vocabulary.

After CHNS 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 132

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners I

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Fan Liu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM; 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate oral proficiency and elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them.

After CHNS 122 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 140

Intermediate Modern Chinese II

Ninghui Liang, Haiwen Wang, Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 130. To be followed by CHNS 150.

After CHNS 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 142

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners II

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Fan Liu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 132.

After CHNS 132 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 150

Advanced Modern Chinese I

Rongzhen Li, Yu-Lin Saussy, Chuanmei Sun
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Third level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Use of audiovisual materials, oral presentations, skits, and longer and more frequent writing assignments to assimilate more sophisticated grammatical structures. Further introduction to a wide variety of written forms and styles. Use of both traditional and simplified forms of Chinese characters.

After CHNS 140 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 151

Advanced Modern Chinese II

Rongzhen Li, Yu-Lin Saussy, Chuanmei Sun
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 PM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 150.

After CHNS 150 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 152

Advanced Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners I

Haiwen Wang, Peisong Xu
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

The third level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate high to advanced low speaking and listening skills and with intermediate reading and writing skills. The goal of the course is to help students effectively expand their skills in reading and writing while concurrently addressing the need to improve their listening and oral skills in formal environments. The materials cover a variety of topics relating to Chinese culture, society and cultural differences, supplemented with authentic video materials.

After CHNS 142 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 153

Advanced Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners II

Haiwen Wang, Peisong Xu
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate to advanced oral proficiency and high elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them. 

After CHNS 152 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 154

Upper Advanced Modern Chinese III

William Zhou
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Fourth level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Readings in a wide range of subjects form the basis of discussion and other activities. Students consolidate their skills, especially speaking proficiency, at an advanced level. Materials use both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 151 or equivalent

China

CHNS 155

Upper Advanced Modern Chinese IV

William Zhou
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 154.

After CHNS 154 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 162

Upper Advanced Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners III

Wei Su
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills and with advanced low reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000–1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 153 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 163

Upper Advanced Modern Chinese for Advanced Learners IV

Wei Su
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Third level of the advanced learner sequence in Chinese. Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills (able to conduct conversations fluently) and with high intermediate reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000–1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 162 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 164

Readings in Contemporary Chinese Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Selected readings in Chinese fiction of the 1980s and 1990s. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 165

Readings in Modern Chinese Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Reading and discussion of modern short stories, most written prior to 1949. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 166

Chinese Media and Society

William Zhou
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a strong focus on speaking and writing skills in formal style. Current affairs and issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as news and blogs on the Internet, television, film, fine arts and so on.

China

CHNS 167

Chinese Media and Society

William Zhou
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a strong focus on speaking and writing skills in formal style. Current affairs and issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as news and blogs on the Internet, television, film, fine arts and so on.

China

CHNS 168

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Min Chen
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 169

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Min Chen
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 170

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Pauline Lin
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, CHNS 153, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 172

Chinese for Scholarly Conversation

Yongtao Zhang
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

This course aims to bring students to advanced competence in all aspects of modern Chinese, and prepare students for advanced research or employment in a variety of China-related fields. Materials include readings on contemporary social, cultural, and political issues, which are written by prominent scholar writers in related fields. This level is suitable for students who have had four years of college Chinese prior to attending, or who have taken three years of an accelerated program meant for heritage speakers.

Prerequisite: CHNS 155, CHNS 162, placement results equivalent to L5, or permission of instructor.

China

CHNS 570

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Pauline Lin
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, 153, or equivalent.

China

EALL 200, CHNS 200, HUMS 270

The Chinese Tradition

Tina Lu, Yongtao Zhang
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

An introduction to the literature, culture, and thought of premodern China, from the beginnings of the written record to the turn of the twentieth century. Close study of textual and visual primary sources, with attention to their historical and cultural backdrops. Students enrolled in CHNS 200 join a weekly Mandarin-language discussion section.

No knowledge of Chinese required for students enrolled in EALL 200. Students enrolled in CHNS 200 must have L5 proficiency in Mandarin or permission of the course instructor.

China

EALL 206, HSAR 206, LITR 175

Japan's Classics in Text and Image

Edward Kamens, Mimi Yiengpruksawan
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

An introduction to the Japanese classics (poetry, narrative fiction, drama) in their manifestations in multiple media, especially in the visual and material realm. Special reference to and engagement with a simultaneous Yale University Art Gallery installation of rare books, paintings, and other works of art from Japan.

No knowledge of Japanese required. Formerly JAPN 200.

Japan

EALL 211, LITR 174, WGSS 405

Women and Literature in Traditional China

Kang-I Chang
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

A study of major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. The power of women’s writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; footbinding; notions of love and death; the aesthetics of illness; women and revolution; poetry clubs; the function of memory in women’s literature; problems of gender and genre.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese. Formerly CHNS 201.

China

EALL 230, HUMS 269

Poetry and Ethics Amidst Imperial Collapse

Lucas Bender
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Du Fu has for the last millennium been considered China’s greatest poet. Close study of nearly one-sixth of his complete works, contextualized by selections from the tradition that defined the art in his age. Exploration of the roles literature plays in interpreting human lives and the ways different traditional forms shape different ethical orientation. Poetry as a vehicle for moral reflection. 

All readings are in English. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 233, HSAR 417

History of Chinese Imperial Parks and Private Gardens

Pauline Lin
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Study of notable parks and private gardens of China, spanning from the 2nd century BCE to contemporary China. Themes include the history, politics, and economics surrounding construction of parks; garden designs and planning; cultural representations of the garden; and modern reinterpreted landscapes. Some sessions meet in the Yale University Art Gallery.

No previous knowledge of Chinese language is necessary. Students previously enrolled in EALL 050 may not take this course for credit.

China

EALL 252, FILM 446, LITR 384

Japanese Cinema before 1960

Aaron Gerow
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM, Screenings T 7:00 PM - 8.00 PM
Fall

The history of Japanese cinema to 1960, including the social, cultural, and industrial backgrounds to its development. Periods covered include the silent era, the coming of sound and the wartime period, the occupation era, the golden age of the 1950s, and the new modernism of the late 1950s.

No knowledge of Japanese required. Formerly JAPN 270. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 255

Japanese Modernism

Seth Jacobowitz
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Japanese literature and art from the 1920s through the 1940s. The avant-garde and mass culture; popular genre fiction; the advent of new media technologies and techniques; effects of Japanese imperialism, militarism, and fascism on cultural production; experimental writers and artists and their resistance to, or complicity with, the state.

Japan

EALL 256, EAST 358, GLBL 251, HUMS 272, LITR 265

China in the World

Jing Tsu
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Recent headlines about China in the world, deciphered in both modern and historical contexts. Interpretation of new events and diverse texts through transnational connections. Topics include China and Africa, Mandarinization, labor and migration, Chinese America, nationalism and humiliation, and art and counterfeit.

Readings and discussion in English.

China

EALL 265, LITR 251

Japanese Literature after 1970

Stephen Poland
HTBA
Spring

Study of Japanese literature published between 1970 and the present. Writers may include Murakami Ryu, Maruya Saiichi, Shimada Masahiko, Nakagami Kenji, Yoshimoto Banana, Yamada Eimi, Murakami Haruki, and Medoruma Shun.

Enrollment limited to 20. No knowledge of Japanese required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 280, FILM 307

East Asian Martial Arts Film

Aaron Gerow
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM; Screenings W 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Fall

The martial arts film has not only been a central genre for many East Asian cinemas, it has been the cinematic form that has most defined those cinemas for others. Domestically, martial arts films have served to promote the nation, while on the international arena, they have been one of the primary conduits of transnational cinematic interaction, as kung-fu or samurai films have influenced films inside and outside East Asia, from The Matrix to Kill Bill. Martial arts cinema has become a crucial means for thinking through such issues as nation, ethnicity, history, East vs. West, the body, gender, sexuality, stardom, industry, spirituality, philosophy, and mediality, from modernity to postmodernity. It is thus not surprising that martial arts films have also attracted some of the world’s best filmmakers, ranging from Kurosawa Akira to Wong Kar Wai. This course focuses on films from Japan, China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and South Korea—as well as on works from other countries influenced by them—covering such martial arts genres such as the samurai film, kung-fu, karate, wuxia, and related historical epics. It provides a historical survey of each nation and genre, while connecting them to other genres, countries, and media.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 286, HUMS 290, LITR 285, PORT 360

The Modern Novel in Brazil and Japan

Seth Jacobowitz
M,W 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Fall

Brazilian and Japanese novels from the late nineteenth century to the present. Representative texts from major authors are read in pairs to explore their commonalities and divergences. Topics include nineteenth-century realism and naturalism, the rise of mass culture and the avant-garde, and existentialism and postmodernism.

No knowledge of Portuguese or Japanese required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan, Transregional

EALL 289, LITR 255

Crime and Detective Fiction in East Asian Literature and Film

Stephen Poland
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Exploration of East Asian literature, film, culture, and history through examination of the genre of “crime” or “detective” fiction. Topics include genre theory, as well as a variety of traveling themes in modernity, such as sexuality, surveillance, colonialism, scientific rationality, perversion, the urban, debt, violence, and transnational cultural flows.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 293

Hiroshima to Fukushima: Ecology and Culture in Japan

Stephen Poland
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

This course explores how Japanese literature, cinema, and popular culture have engaged with questions of environment, ecology, pollution, and climate change from the wake of the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima in 1945 to the ongoing Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster in the present. Environmental disasters and the slow violence of their aftermath have had an enormous impact on Japanese cultural production, and we examine how these cultural forms seek to negotiate and work through questions of representing the unrepresentable, victimhood and survival, trauma and national memory, uneven development and discrimination, the human and the nonhuman, and climate change’s impact on imagining the future. Special attention is given to the possibilities and limitations of different forms—the novel, poetry, film, manga, anime—that Japanese writers and artists have to think about humans’ relationship with the environment. 

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 299

Decolonizing East Asia

Stephen Poland
HTBA
Spring

Exploration of how literary and cinematic works engaged with, promoted, critiqued, and struggled with empire and colonization in East Asia from the late-nineteenth-century to the present day. Topics include Japan’s imperial rivalry with colonial and postcolonial Europe; post-WWII cultural works and the neoimperialism of Soviet-American Cold War order; empire and colonization after the Cold War, especially in terms of the rise of China; and continued relevance of past imperial formations in twenty-first-century cultural production.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 300

Sinological Methods

Pauline Lin
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A research course in Chinese studies, designed for students with background in modern and literary Chinese. Exploration and evaluation of the wealth of primary sources and research tools available in Chinese. For native speakers of Chinese, introduction to the secondary literature in English and instruction in writing professionally in English on topics about China. Topics include the compilation and development of Chinese bibliographies; bibliophiles’ notes; editions, censorship, and textual variation and reliability; specialized dictionaries; maps and geographical gazetteers; genealogies and biographical sources; archaeological and visual materials; and major Chinese encyclopedias and compendia.

After CHNS 171 or equivalent. Formerly CHNS 202. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 302

Readings in Classical Chinese Prose

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Close reading of classical Chinese texts (wenyan) primarily from late Imperial China. A selection of formal and informal prose, including memoirs, sanwen essays, classical tales, biographies, and autobiographies. Focus on cultural and historical contexts, with attention to reception in China and in some cases in Korea and Japan. Questions concerning readership and governmental censorship, function of literature, history and fictionality, memory and writing, and the aesthetics of qing (emotion).

Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. Prerequisite: CHNS 171 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Formerly CHNS 302. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 304

Li Yu (1610-1680): Playwright, Storyteller, Pornographer

Tina Lu
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Students read across the complete works of this major seventeenth-century figure. Li Yu was a short story writer, a playwright, a literary critic, an essayist, and a pornographer. Each week we read a substantial amount of Li Yu’s writings to better understand his corpus as a whole and also as a window onto seventeenth-century culture.

Prerequisites: CHNS 171 or permission of instructor. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 357

Meiji Literature and Visual Culture

Seth Jacobowitz
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

Introduction to the literature and visual culture of Meiji Japan (1868–1912), including novels, poetry, calligraphy, woodblock prints, painting, photography, and cinema. The relationship between theories and practices of fine art and literature; changes in word and image relations; transformations from woodblock to movable-type print culture; the invention of photography and early forms of cinematic practice.

No knowledge of Japanese required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 506, HSAR 509

Japan's Classics in Text and Image

Edward Kamens, Mimi Yiengpruksawan
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Fiction, poetry, and plays from the eighth century through the nineteenth, studied alongside related works of art and illustrated books housed in collections at Yale. An introduction to the Japanese classics as well as an example of interdisciplinary study in the humanities.

No knowledge of Japanese required.

Japan

EALL 511

Women and Literature in Traditional China

Kang-I Chang
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

This course focuses on major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. Topics include the power of women’s writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; the cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; foot binding and its implications; women’s notion of love and death; the aesthetic of illness; women and revolution; women’s poetry clubs; the function of memory in women’s literature; problems of gender and genre.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese.

China

EALL 530

Poetry & Ethics Amidst Imperial Collapse

Lucas Bender
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Du Fu has for the last millennium been considered China’s greatest poet. Close study of nearly one-sixth of his complete works, contextualized by selections from the tradition that defined the art in his age. Exploration of the roles literature plays in interpreting human lives and the ways different traditional forms shape different ethical orientation. Poetry as a vehicle for moral reflection. 

All readings are in English.

China

EALL 552

Japanese Cinema before 1960

Aaron Gerow
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM, Screenings T 7:00 PM - 8.00 PM
Fall

The history of Japanese cinema to 1960, including the social, cultural, and industrial backgrounds to its development. Periods covered include the silent era, the coming of sound and the wartime period, the occupation era, the golden age of the 1950s, and the new modernism of the late 1950s.

Japan

EALL 555

Japanese Modernism

Seth Jacobowitz
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Japanese literature and art from the 1920s through the 1940s. The avant-garde and mass culture; popular genre fiction; the advent of new media technologies and tech­niques; effects of Japanese imperialism, militarism, and fascism on cultural production; experimental writers and artists and their resistance to, or complicity with, the state.

Japan

EALL 565

Japanese Literature after 1970

Stephen Poland
HTBA
Spring

Study of Japanese literature published between 1970 and the present. Writers may include Murakami Ryu, Maruya Saiichi, Shimada Masahiko, Nakagami Kenji, Yoshimoto Banana, Yamada Eimi, Murakami Haruki, and Medoruma Shun.

No knowledge of Japanese required.

Japan

EALL 586, CPLT 952

Modern Novel in Japan and Brazil

Seth Jacobowitz
MW 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Fall

Brazilian and Japanese novels from the late nineteenth century to the present. Representative texts from major authors are read in pairs to explore their commonalities and divergences. Topics include nineteenth-century realism and naturalism, the rise of mass culture and the avant-garde, and existentialism and postmodernism.

Japan, Transregional

EALL 593

Hiroshima to Fukushima: Ecology and Culture in Japan

Stephen Poland
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

This course explores how Japanese literature, cinema, and popular culture have engaged with questions of environment, ecology, pollution, and climate change from the wake of the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima in 1945 to the ongoing Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster in the present. Environmental disasters and the slow violence of their aftermath have had an enormous impact on Japanese cultural production, and we examine how these cultural forms seek to negotiate and work through questions of representing the unrepresentable, victimhood and survival, trauma and national memory, uneven development and discrimination, the human and the nonhuman, and climate change’s impact on imagining the future. Special attention is given to the possibilities and limitations of different forms—the novel, poetry, film, manga, anime—that Japanese writers and artists have to think about humans’ relationship with our environment.

Japan

EALL 599

Decolonizing East Asia

Stephen Poland
HTBA
Spring

This course explores how literary and cinematic works engaged with, promoted, critiqued, and struggled with empire and colonization in East Asia from the late-nineteenth century to the present. We explore how the very ideas of “literature” and “cinema” in East Asia were entangled with the rise of the Japanese empire in the context of imperial rivalry with Europe, and how these categories were contested and transformed by writers and filmmakers in colonial and postcolonial contexts. The course also examines how discourses of empire and colonization continued to be relevant in post-WWII cultural works grappling with the neoimperialism of Soviet-American Cold War order. Finally, we consider questions of empire and colonization after the Cold War, especially in terms of the rise of China and continued relevance of past imperial formations in twenty-first-century cultural production.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 600

Sinological Methods

Pauline Lin
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A research course in Chinese studies, designed for students with background in modern and literary Chinese. Exploration and evaluation of the wealth of primary sources and research tools available in Chinese. For native speakers of Chinese, introduction to the secondary literature in English and instruction in writing professionally in English on topics about China. Topics include the compilation and development of Chinese bibli­ographies; bibliophiles’ notes; editions, censorship, and textual variation and reliability; specialized dictionaries; maps and geographical gazetteers; genealogies and biographi­cal sources; archaeological and visual materials; and major Chinese encyclopedias and compendia.

China

EALL 602

Readings in Classical Chinese Prose

Kang-I Chang
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Close reading of classical Chinese texts (wenyan) primarily from late Imperial China. A selection of formal and informal prose, including memoirs, sanwen essays, classical tales, biographies, and autobiographies. Focus on cultural and historical contexts, with attention to reception in China and in some cases in Korea and Japan. Questions concerning readership and governmental censorship, function of literature, history and fictionality, memory and writing, and the aesthetics of qing (emotion).

Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. Prerequisite: CHNS 171 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

China

EALL 657

Meiji Literature and Visual Culture

Seth Jacobowitz
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

Introduction to the literature and visual culture of Meiji Japan (1868–1912), including novels, poetry, calligraphy, woodblock prints, painting, photography, and cinema. The relationship between theories and practices of fine art and literature; changes in word and image relations; transformations from woodblock to movable-type print culture; the invention of photography and early forms of cinematic practice.

Japan

EALL 700, RLST 594

The Three Teachings in Medieval China

Lucas Bender, Eric Greene
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

This course explores intersections between the Three Teachings—Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism—in late medieval China, focusing on the seventh through the ninth century. Too often studied in isolation from one another, these religious and intellectual teachings were deeply intertwined throughout this period, and scholars aiming to understand the religious, intellectual, and literary history of the Tang need to be able to read broadly across their boundaries. 

All primary readings are in classical/literary Chinese. Open to undergraduates with sufficient language skills. Prerequisite: reading ability in classical/literary Chinese.

China

EALL 710, HSAR 822

Fragmentism and Assemblage in Traditional Japanese Culture

Edward Kamens, Mimi Yiengpruksawan
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

A cross-disciplinary consideration of the phenomenon of disaggregation of texts and visual artworks and their reconfiguration in new forms. Focus on examples from the Japanese past in comparative and theoretical perspective. Students engage directly in the preparation of an installation on this theme in the Yale Art Gallery for spring 2019.

Prerequisite: proficiency in literary and modern Japanese.

Japan

EALL 801, CPLT 912

Media Theory, Capitalism, and Japanese Modernity

Seth Jacobowitz
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

This course introduces students to key aspects of Western media theory and media history through readings by leading thinkers such as Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, Friedrich Kittler, Lewis Mumford, Martin Heidegger, and Marshall McLuhan. It then brings these works into dialogue with recent critical studies of Japanese modernity, capitalism, and contemporary information society by Naoki Sakai, Karatani Kojin, Akira Lippit, Azuma Hiroki, and others.

All readings are in English.

Japan

EALL 806, FILM 921

Research in Japanese Film History

Aaron Gerow
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Theorizations of film and culture in Japan from the 1910s to the present. Through readings in the works of a variety of authors, the course explores both the articulations of cinema in Japanese intellectual discourse and how this embodies the shifting position of film in Japanese popular cultural history.

Japan

EALL 850

Theory in/and East Asia

Stephen Poland
HTBA
Spring

This seminar engages with the question of what “Theory” might mean in the context of East Asian cultural studies. Many critiques have been made of the way “traveling theory” serves as a Euro-American universal applied to the “raw material” of East Asian texts, or as a transdisciplinary common language in the humanities and social sciences. We take this notion as a starting point to explore the intersections and interactions of “Theory” and “East Asia.” Questions include: What is Theory? Who gets to theorize? How have thinkers in East Asia engaged with Theory? How has Theory engaged with East Asia? What have been the major issues and debates in Theory, and how can they apply to scholarship on East Asian cultural production? How can the work of thinkers in/of East Asia offer critiques of Theory, and what problems arise from such challenges? These questions will also be situated in the historical context of disciplinary formation and the creation of Area Studies in universities in the United States. 

Readings are primarily in English, but may also include Japanese, Chinese, or Korean depending on student interest and language abilities.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EALL 873, EAST 573, HIST 873

China and the World circa 1900

Peter Perdue, Jing Tsu
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Reading and discussion of significant themes in China and world history in the first decade of the twentieth century. We concentrate on topics that contain international, transnational, and comparative implications, and include discussion of literary and historical material. Most readings are in English, but selected primary sources in Asian languages may be used. Open to all History, East Asian Studies, and East Asian Languages and Literatures students, and others by request. Includes research paper and weekly writing exercises. 

Prerequisite: knowledge of one foreign language, European or Asian.

China

EAST 401, HIST 350J, WGSS 401

Gender in Modern Korea: History and Representation

Young Sun Park
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

This seminar examines the cinematic representation of Korean masculinity and femininity through history: from the appearance of the New Woman in the early twentieth century to the commercialized woman under the wave of neoliberalism more recently. By contextualizing these themes within the history of modern Korea, this class introduces students to major filmic texts and encourages them to historicize the dominant representations of gender by identifying the relevant, preferred categories and aesthetics of particular periods. Students are expected to engage in critical reading, analysis, and writing. Students also analyze and interpret the cinematic depictions to ask how these films illuminate issues of gender within the context of major historical themes such as national identity, external relations, and political and social conflict. Korean history presents a special opportunity for such an exercise because of South Korea’s very sophisticated popular culture industry, and because of this industry’s welcome dedication to re-imagining historical figures, events, and settings. 

Permission of instructor required.

Korea

EAST 402, HSAR 477

Chinese Art and Archaeology at the Yale University Art Gallery

Gabrielle Niu
Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

This course is a study of major works in Chinese art and archaeology, as well as an investigation into collection history at the Yale University Art Gallery (YUAG). The course moves chronologically through major periods and sites of Chinese art and archaeology, with special attention paid to those represented by works in the YUAG. Classroom sessions are based on discussion and readings of primary texts in translation and secondary scholarship, while museum sessions involve close visual analysis and discussion of objects either in the galleries or object study classrooms (OSC). During museum sessions, students also examine the provenance of objects and associated archival materials. Students learn about the history of collecting Chinese objects throughout the 20th century and its relationship to the University.

Permission of instructor required.

China

EAST 403, ANTH 405, SOCY 309

Digital China: Using Computational Methods to Illuminate Society, Politics, Culture, and History

Charles Chang
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

In the humanities and social sciences, those who study China face a vast volume of disparate information that ranges from historical archives and maps to the news and social media posts of our time. Such abundance and variety of data can seem daunting, quite beyond an individual’s capacity to digest, and yet, with appropriate concepts and methods, the data can be accessed and sorted out in such a way as to allow the researcher to address questions, hitherto neglected or insufficiently analyzed, in Chinese history, politics, society, and culture. The course has two components: seminar and workshop. In the seminar, we discuss the ideas and concepts behind the collection of data, which could be temporal, spatial, or textual; this is followed by an introduction to network analysis and visualization. In the workshop, students gain hands-on experience in the full actualization of a project. Note that although the course’s title is “Digital China,” its ideas and methods are applicable to other non-Western countries. Students whose research interest lies in, Southeast Asia, Central Asia, or Africa are welcome. 

Permission of instructor required.

China

EAST 404, EVST 403, HIST 369J

The City in Modern East Asia

Michael Thornton
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Cities in East Asia developed into cosmopolitan urban centers in the modern era. They hosted encounters with Western empires and witnessed the rise of new forms of participatory politics; they not only reflected the broader efforts of their respective nation-states to modernize and industrialize, but also produced violent reactions against state regimes. They served as nodes in networks of migrants, commerce, and culture that grew more extensive in the modern era. In these ways, the history of East Asian urbanism is the history of the fluidity and dynamism of urban society and politics in the context of an increasingly interconnected modern world. We study cosmopolitan cities across East Asia from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present day. A comparative approach allows us to explore both general trends and themes, and distinct historical experiences across the countries of the region. Specific seminar topics include: urban politics, including state-society relations; cities as sites of geopolitical and imperial encounters; changes in urban society, including the impact of migration and social conflict; the urban environment, including natural and man-made disasters; urban planning, at the local, national and transnational scale; and ways of visualizing the city.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 405, MUSI 476, THST 326

Chinese Opera

Kelsey Seymour
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This course introduces students to varieties of Chinese opera through plays, Chinese theories of music and acting, modern scholarship, and recorded media. Furthermore, students learn strategies to evaluate written and performed aspects of Chinese opera in a manner that can be extended to Western opera, film, and other performed genres.

Permission of instructor required.

China

EAST 407, PLSC 389

The Political Economy of Reform in China

Adam Liu
HTBA
Spring

Intended for graduate students and upper year undergraduates, this class seeks to explain how politics and the evolution of political institutions help explain the patterns and outcomes of major economic reforms in a single-party authoritarian state. While the focus is on China, important themes in political economy will be drawn and discussed. 

Permission of instructor requried.

China

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 491

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 492

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 500, HSAR 803

Reflecting Truth: Meiji Photography between Performativity and Representation, Modernity and Empire

Ayelet Zohar
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Celebrating 150 years since the Meiji Restoration (1868) is an ideal opportunity to look back and ponder the engagement with an alternative history of photography, from a Japanese point of view. Photography arrived in Japan soon after its creation in the UK and France (1839), and first images were created as soon as 1848 in Kagoshima and Nagasaki. We consider the two paths photography developed in Japan, and their intersections: experimental approaches with performative modes of execution (i.e., direct light, opaque image, camera-less photographs, etc.), versus representations of Japan, a method that can be studied through two tracks—the creation of exotic, nonmodern images for the Western, consuming eye; and the documentation of Japan’s rapid modernization and political developments into settlement, nationalism, colonialism, and militarism.

Japan

EAST 900

Master’s Thesis

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 900

Master's Thesis

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 910

Independent Study

By arrangement with faculty and with approval of the DGS.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 910

Independent Study

By arrangement with faculty and with approval of the DGS.

China, Japan, Transregional

ECON 442

Microfoundations of Growth in China

Xiaoxue Zhao
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

A comprehensive overview of the challenges China faces as it transitions from a centrally planned economy to adopting a greater reliance on market-based mechanisms. Review of microeconomic literature on China’s recent economic and institutional transformation to provide a general analytical framework for understanding the economic implications of the process. 

Prerequisites: intermediate microeconomics and econometrics. Permission of instructor required.

China

GLBL 312, EAST 454, ECON 474

Economic and Policy Lessons from Japan

Stephen Roach
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

An evaluation of Japan’s protracted economic problems and of their potential implications for other economies, including the United States, Europe, and China. Currency pressures, policy blunders, Abenomics, bubbles, and the global economic crisis of 2008; dangers to the global economy from a protracted postcrisis recovery period. Focus on policy remedies to avert similar problems in other countries.

Prerequisite: a course in macroeconomics. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

GLBL 318, EAST 338, ECON 338

The Next China

Stephen Roach
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Economic development in China since the late 1970s. Emphasis on factors pushing China toward a transition from its modern export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. The possibility of a resulting identity crisis, underscored by China’s need to embrace political reform and by the West’s long-standing misperceptions of China.

Prerequisite: introductory macroeconomics.

China

GLBL 376

Asia Now: Human Rights, Globalization, Cultural Conflicts

Jing Tsu
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This course examines contemporary and global issues in Asia (east, southeast, northeast, south), in a historical and interdisciplinary context, that include international law, policy debates, cultural issues, security, military history, media, science and technology, and cyber warfare. Course is co-taught with a guest professor.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia

GLBL 552

Asia Now: Human Rights, Globalization, Cultural Conflicts

Jing Tsu
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This course examines contemporary and global issues in Asia (east, southeast, northeast, south), in a historical and interdisciplinary context that includes international law, policy debates, cultural issues, security, military history, media, science and technology, and cyber warfare.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia

GLBL 616

China’s Rise and the Future of Foreign Policy

David Rank
F 3:30-5:20
Fall

China’s return to its traditional role as a regional—and, increasingly, global—power has implications for the political, security, and economic structures that have been the foundation of the international system since the end of the Second World War. This course looks at the impact China’s ascent has had, the challenges a rising China will pose for policy makers in the years ahead, and the internal issues China will need to address in the years ahead. It does so from the perspective of a practitioner who spent nearly three decades working on U.S. foreign policy and U.S.-China relations.

China

GLBL 618, MGT 911

The Next China

Stephen Roach
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Born out of necessity in the post-Cultural Revolution chaos of the late 1970s, modern China is about reforms, opening up, and transition. The Next China will be driven by the transition from an export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. China’s new model could unmask a dual identity crisis—underscored by China’s need to embrace political reform and the West’s long-standing misperceptions about China. 

Prerequisite: basic undergraduate macroeconomics.

China

HIST 321

China from Present to Past, 2015-600

Valerie Hansen
T, Th 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Underlying causes of current issues facing China traced back to their origins in the premodern period. Topics include economic development, corruption, environmental crises, gender, and Pacific island disputes. Selected primary-source readings in English, images, videos, and Web resources.

China

HIST 339

China's Last Empire: The Rise and Fall of the Qing Dynasty, 1600-1912

Peter Perdue
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

An overview of important events and processes in China’s last and largest dynasty.

China

HIST 884

Readings in the History of Modern Japan

Daniel Botsman
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This course offers students an opportunity to explore recent English-language scholarship on the history of modern Japan (post-1868).

Japan

HIST 888, RLST 592

Society and Religion on the Silk Road

Eric Greene, Valerie Hansen
W 1:30 - 5:20
Spring

An introduction to artifacts and documents pertaining to social history and religion from the most important sites on the Northern and Southern Silk Roads in China, including Niya, Kizil, Turfan, and Dunhuang. Assigned readings are in English. Readers of Chinese also participate in a separate section reading documents in classical Chinese from Turfan and Dunhuang.

China

HSAR 144

Arts of the Silk Road

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
M,W 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Spring

Introduction to the art history of the Silk Road regions, 200 BCE – 1200 CE, with emphasis on the intersection of local and global in visual practices from Kashgar to Nara and beyond. Emphasis on examples of Buddhist, Manichaean, Zoroastrian, Christian, and Islamic art in the context of transaction and exchange along the Silk Road network.

China, Japan, Transregional

HSAR 814

Japan’s Global Baroque

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
Th 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Fall

The intersection of art, science, and diplomacy at Kyoto and Nagasaki in the time of Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish, and Dutch cultural and mercantile interaction in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, with attention to the entangled political relations linking the shogun Toyotomi Hideyoshi, Philip II of Spain, Jesuit missionaries such as Alessandro Valignano, and the Christian daimyō of Kyushu and the Inland Sea. Focus on Japanese castle architecture, nanban screens, world maps, arte sacra, and tea ceremony practices as related to the importation of European arte sacra, prints and drawings, scientific instruments, and world atlases such as Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. Includes inquiry into back-formations such as “baroque” and “global” to describe and/or interpret sixteenth- and seventeenth-century cultural productions.

Japan

JAPN 110

Elementary Japanese I

Koichi Hiroe, Yoshiko Maruyama, Aoi Saito, Masahiko Seto, Mari Stever
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Introductory language course for students with no previous background in Japanese. Development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, including 50 hiragana, 50 katakana, and 75 kanji characters. Introduction to cultural aspects such as levels of politeness and group concepts. In-class drills in pronunciation and conversation. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

Credit only on completion of JAPN 120. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 120

Elementary Japanese II

Koichi Hiroe, Michiaki Murata, Aoi Saito, Mari Stever
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 110, with supplementary materials such as excerpts from television shows, anime, and songs. Introduction of 150 additional kanji.

After JAPN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 130

Intermediate Japanese I

Yoshiko Maruyama, Hiroyo Nishimura
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Continued development in both written and spoken Japanese. Aspects of Japanese culture, such as history, art, religion, and cuisine, explored through text, film, and animation. Online audio and visual aids facilitate listening, as well as the learning of grammar and kanji. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 140

Intermediate Japanese II

Yoshiko Maruyama, Hiroyo Nishimura
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 130.

After JAPN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 150

Advanced Japanese I

Hiroyo Nishimura, Mari Stever
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Advanced language course that further develops proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Reading and discussion materials include works by Nobel Prize winners. Japanese anime and television dramas are used to enhance listening and to develop skills in culturally appropriate speech. Writing of essays, letters, and criticism solidifies grammar and style. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 140 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 151

Advanced Japanese II

Hiroyo Nishimura, Mari Stever
M,W or T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 150.

After JAPN 150 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 156

Advanced Japanese III

Hiroyo Nishimura
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Close reading of modern Japanese writing on current affairs, social science, history, and literature. Development of speaking and writing skills in academic settings, including formal speeches, interviews, discussions, letters, e-mail, and expository writing. Interviews of and discussions with native speakers on current issues. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 157

Advanced Japanese IV

Michiaki Murata
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 156.

After JAPN 156 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 162

Reading Academic Japanese I

Koichi Hiroe
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Close reading of major writings from the Meiji era to the present, including newspaper articles, scholarly works, fiction, and prose. Students gain a command of academic Japanese through comprehensive study of grammar in the context of culture. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 157 or equivalent; recommended to be taken after or concurrently with JAPN 170.

Japan

JAPN 164

Academic and Professional Spoken Japanese

Michiaki Murata
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on the speaking skills necessary in academic and professional settings. Includes online interviews, discussions, and debates with native Japanese students and scholars on contemporary topics such as globalization, environment, technology, human rights, and cultural studies. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 157 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 165

Academic and Professional Spoken Japanese

Mari Stever
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on the speaking skills necessary in academic and professional settings. Includes online interviews, discussions, and debates with native Japanese students and scholars on contemporary topics such as globalization, environment, technology, human rights, and cultural studies. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 164 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 170

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Edward Kamens
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 171

Readings in Literary Japanese


HTBA
Spring

Close analytical reading of a selection of texts from the Nara through the Tokugawa periods: prose, poetry, and various genres. Introduction to kanbun.

After JAPN 170 or equivalent. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

JAPN 510

Japanese for Sinologists

Masahiko Seto
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Intensive Japanese reading course designed for Sinologists. Includes canonical texts from the nineteenth to the twentieth century by Japanese scholars of Chinese history, literature, cultural studies, and law. Reading comprehension and grammar as well as vocabulary are strengthened. The principal text is Japanese for Sinologists by Joshua A. Fogel and Fumiko Joo.

Prerequisite: JAPN 150 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 510

Japanese for Sinologists

Masahiko Seto
M,W 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Intensive Japanese reading course designed for Sinologists. Includes canonical texts from the nineteenth to the twentieth century by Japanese scholars of Chinese history, literature, cultural studies, and law. Reading comprehension and grammar as well as vocabulary are strengthened. The principal text is Japanese for Sinologists by Joshua A. Fogel and Fumiko Joo.

Prerequisite: JAPN 150 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 570

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Edward Kamens
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 571

Readings in Literary Japanese


HTBA
Spring

Close analytical reading of a selection of texts from the Nara through Tokugawa period: prose, poetry, and various genres. Introduction of kanbun.

After JAPN 570 or equivalent.

Japan

KREN 110

Elementary Korean I

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

A beginning course in modern Korean. Pronunciation, lectures on grammar, conversation practice, and introduction to the writing system (Hankul).

Credit only on completion of KREN 120. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 120

Elementary Korean II

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 110.

After KREN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 130

Intermediate Korean I

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Continued development of skills in modern Korean, spoken and written, leading to intermediate-level proficiency.

After KREN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 132

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners I

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Intended for students with some oral proficiency but little or no training in Hankul. Focus on grammatical analysis, the standard spoken language, and intensive training in reading and writing.

This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 140

Intermediate Korean II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 130.

After KREN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 142

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 132.

After KREN 132 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 152

Advanced Korean for Advanced Learners

Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An advanced course in modern Korean. Reading of short stories, essays, and journal articles, and introduction of 200 Chinese characters. Students develop their speaking and writing skills through discussions and written exercises.

After KREN 142 or 151, or with permission of instructor.

Korea

KREN 154

Advanced Korean III

Seungja Choi
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

An advanced language course designed to develop reading and writing skills using Web-based texts in a variety of genres. Students read texts independently and complete comprehension and vocabulary exercises through the Web. Discussions, tests, and intensive writing training in class.

After KREN 151 or equivalent.

Korea

LAW 21179

Contemporary China Research Seminar

Research and writing on contemporary problems related to China, including but not limited to legal issues. The class will meet roughly six times during the semester to discuss particular China-related issues (occasionally with a guest) and at the end of the semester for student presentations of their research. The remainder of the semester the students will work on their research and writing projects and individually meet with the instructors to discuss their work. Students interested in the seminar should submit a statement of interest explaining their background related to China and research ideas they are considering.

Paper required. Enrollment limited to ten. Permission of the instructor required.

China

PLSC 357, EAST 310, GLBL 309

The Rise of China

Daniel Mattingly
M,W 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
Fall

Analysis of contemporary Chinese politics, with focus on how the country has become a major power and how the regime has endured. Topics include China’s recent history, state, ruling party, economy, censorship, elite politics, and foreign policy.

China

PLSC 389, EAST 407

The Political Economy of Reform in China

Adam Liu
HTBA
Spring

Intended for graduate students and upper year undergraduates, this class seeks to explain how politics and the evolution of political institutions help explain the patterns and outcomes of major economic reforms in a single-party authoritarian state. While the focus is on China, important themes in political economy will be drawn and discussed.

Permission of instructor required.

China

PLSC 747, GLBL 533

The Political Economy of Reform in China

Adam Liu
HTBA
Spring

This class seeks to explain how politics and the evolution of political institutions help explain the patterns and outcomes of major economic reforms in a single-party authoritarian state. While the focus is on China, important themes in political economy are drawn and discussed.

China

REL 941

Chinese and Japanese Christian Literature

Chloe Starr
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

What effect did Christianity have on modern Chinese literature, if any, and what sort of Christianity emerges from Chinese Christian literature? Is Endo Shusaku the only Japanese Christian writer (and does Martin Scorsese’s film do justice to his novel Silence)? This course traces the development of a Christian literature in China and Japan from late Imperial times to the end of the twentieth century, with particular focus on the heyday (in China) of the 1920s and ’30s, and on the Japanese side, on Endo’s postwar novels. Using texts available in English, the class examines how Christian ideas and metaphors permeated the literary—and revolutionary—imagination in East Asia. The influence of Christianity on literature came directly through the Bible and church education, and indirectly through translated European and Western literature, but it is rarely clearly in evidence. The course tests the aesthetic visions and construction of the human being in the early Republic, among Japanese samurai in Mexico, and in the martyrs of Nagasaki.

China, Japan, Transregional

RLST 102, EAST 390

Atheism and Buddhism

Hwansoo Kim
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A critical examination of atheism and religions (Buddhism), with a focus on intellectual, religious, philosophical, and scientific debates about God, the origin of the universe, morality, evolution, neuroscience, happiness, enlightenment, the afterlife, and karma. Readings selected from philosophical, scientific, and religious writings. Authors include some of the following: Charles Darwin, Bertrand Russell, Christopher Hitchins, Richard Dawkins, Deepak Chopra, Sam Harris, Owen Flanagan, Stephen Batchelor, and the Dalai Lama. 

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

RLST 121, EAST 391

Religion and Culture in Korea

Hwansoo Kim
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Introduction to Shamanism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Christianity, and new religions in Korea from ancient times to the present. Examination of religious traditions in close relationships with social, economic, political, and cultural environments in Korean society. Examination of religious tensions, philosophical arguments, and ethical issues that indigenous and foreign religions in Korea have engaged throughout history to maximize their influence in Korean society. 

Permission of instructor required.

Korea

RLST 125, EAST 125, SAST 267

Introduction to Buddhist Thought and Practice

Eric Greene
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Significant aspects of Buddhism as practiced mainly in India and South Asia, including philosophy and ethics, monastic and ascetic life, meditation and ritual practices, and the material culture of Buddhist societies. The Mahayana tradition that emerged in the first century B.C.E.; later forms of esoteric Buddhism known as tantra; the development of modern Buddhism in Asia and its manifestation in the West. Readings from Buddhist texts in translation.

China, Transregional, South Asia

RLST 344, EALL 294, EAST 393

Death and the Afterlife in Chinese Cultures

Kelsey Seymour
M,W 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

This seminar explores ideas surrounding death in China and Taiwan, including retribution, the afterlife, and ghosts in Chinese religious traditions. To investigate this, we turn to religious scriptures, mortuary items, documentaries, and scholarly writings, and ask ourselves the following questions: How do concepts of the afterlife reflect and affect the situations of the living? How do the living maintain a relationship with the dead?

Permission of instructor required.

China

RLST 357, EAST 392, WGSS 359

Buddhism and Sexuality

Hwansoo Kim
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Critical examination of the relation of religion and sexuality with special attention to Buddhism. Discussion of religious interpretations of sex, sexuality, and gender; the codification and normalization of these rules through texts, symbols, and practices; and recent challenges to these interpretations. Topics include homosexuality, same-sex marriage, abortion, contraception, gender equality, clerical marriage, married clerics’ wives, and clerical sexual abuse. Draws on religious theory, gender theory, and critical theory. Places Buddhism in conversation with Jewish, Christian, and Islamic traditions. 

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

RLST 598, EAST 511

Modern Korean Buddhism in the Global Context

Hwansoo Kim
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This course situates modern Korean Buddhism in the global context of the late nineteenth century to the present. Through critical examination of the dynamic relationship between Korean Buddhism and the Buddhisms of key East Asian cities—Shanghai, Tokyo, Taipei, and Lhasa—the course seeks to understand modern East Asian Buddhism in a transnational light. Discussion includes analyzing the impact of Christian missionaries, pan-Asian and global ideologies, colonialism, Communism, capitalism, war, science, hypermodernity, and atheism.

Korea