CEAS Courses 2021-2022

This list is subject to modification.

Some of the information contained here may have changed since the time of publication. Always check with the department under which the course is listed or on Yale University Course Search to make sure that the courses you are interested in are still being offered and that the times have not changed.

If you have questions about any of the courses listed here, please contact the offering department directly.

ANTH 326, ARCG 326

Ancient Civilizations of the Eurasian Steppes

William Honeychurch
F 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Examination of peoples of the steppe zone that stretches from Eastern Europe to Mongolia. Overview of what archaeologists know about Eurasian steppe societies, with emphasis on the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron, and medieval ages. Attention both to material culture and to historical sources. Topics range from the domestication of the horse to Genghis Khan’s world empire, including the impact these events had on neighboring civilizations in Europe and Asia.

Permission of instructor required.

Transregional, Mongolia

ANTH 387, ARCG 387

East Asian Objects and Museums

Anne Underhill
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Exploration of East Asian art and anthropological collections at Yale’s museums and at other major museums in North America and East Asia. Through study of the pioneers who created these collections and the formation history of the collections, students consider the meaning and importance of contemporary museum practice. A student-curated exhibition in conjunction with Yale University Art Gallery. Trips to regional museums and attendance at Yale sponsored conference on Korean Art and Photograph Collections.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

ANTH 397, ARCG 397

Archaeology of East Asia

Anne Underhill
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the findings and practice of archaeology in China, Japan, Korea, and southeast Asia. Methods used by archaeologists to interpret social organization, economic organization, and ritual life. Attention to major transformations such as the initial peopling of an area, establishment of farming villages, the development of cities, interregional interactions, and the nature of political authority.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, Southeast Asia

ANTH 414, EAST 417

Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations; class, gender, ethnicity, and migration; and global landscapes of power and citizenship.

Permission of instructor required. This course meets during reading period.

China, Transregional

ANTH 419, EAST 419

Anthropology of Japan: Continuity and Change


Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

Taking an anthropological perspective, this course provides an introductory survey of Japan, which is designed to interest students who not only wish to learn about the different conditions of modern Japanese life but are also curious about the enormous global impact that this non-Western society has had over the last century. Japan currently faces a historically crucial moment as it fosters more international ties—both within and outside Asia—moving beyond its postwar relationship with the United States. In this seminar, we discuss topics of the workplace, schooling, youth culture, family matters, gender and feminism, religion and nationalism, social media, and demographic challenges. As such, the course draws on scholarship from across the social sciences as well as a broad range of perspectives about contemporary Japan, considering thematically coherent issues that inform students on how Japan’s complex society may be approached by anthropologists. 

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

ANTH 575

Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Helen Siu
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations, class, gender, ethnicity, migration, and global landscapes of power and citizenship.

China, Transregional

ANTH 726, ARCG 726

Ancient Civilizations of the Eurasian Steppes

William Honeychurch
F 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

Peoples of the steppe zone, stretching from Eastern Europe to Mongolia, have played a pivotal role in Old World prehistory, though much about their societies and lifeways is still shrouded in mystery. The archaeology of this macro-region has developed rapidly since the 1990s, and this course presents an overview of major topics and debates in the region based on what archaeologists currently know about Eurasian steppe societies of the past.

Transregional, Mongolia

ANTH 787, ARCG 787, HSAR 804

East Asian Objects and Museums: Collection, Curation, and Display

Anne Underhill
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This course explores the East Asian art and anthropological collections at Yale’s museums and at other major museums in North America and East Asia. Students study collections and their histories; gain experience in museum practices; and learn from specialists through class visits to other relevant museums in the United States.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

ANTH 797, ARCG 797

Archaeology of East Asia

Anne Underhill
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the findings and practice of archaeology in China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia. Methods used by archaeologists to interpret social organization, economic organization, and ritual life. Attention to major transformations such as the initial peopling of an area, establishment of farming villages, the development of cities, interregional interactions, and the nature of political authority.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, Southeast Asia

ARCH 3240

Spatial Concepts of Japan

Yoko Kawai
W 2:00 PM - 3:50 PM
Fall

The seminar explores the origins and developments of Japanese spatial concepts and surveys how they help form the contemporary architecture, ways of life, and cities of the country. Many Japanese spatial concepts, such as MA, are about creating time-space distances and relationship between objects, people, space, and experiences. These concepts go beyond the fabric of a built structure, and encompass architecture, landscape, and city. Each class is designed around one or two Japanese words that signify particular design concepts. Each week, a lecture on the word(s) with its design features, backgrounds, historical examples, and contemporary application is followed by student discussion. Contemporary works studied include those by Maki, Isozaki, Ando, Ito, SANAA, and Fujimoto. The urbanism and landscape of Tokyo and Kyoto are discussed. Students are required to make in-class presentations and write a final paper. 

Limited enrollment

Japan

ARCH 3304

Japanese Gardens

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Arts and theory of the Japanese garden with emphasis on the role of the anthropogenic landscape from aesthetics to environmental precarity, including the concept of refugium. Case studies of influential Kyoto gardens from the eleventh through fifteenth century, and their significance as cultural productions with ecological implications.

Japan

ARCH 341, GLBL 253, LAST 318, URBN 341

Globalization Space

Keller Easterling
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM; W 11:30 AM - 12:20 PM
Spring

Infrastructure space as a primary medium of change in global polity. Networks of trade, energy, communication, transportation, spatial products, finance, management, and labor, as well as new strains of political opportunity that reside within their spatial disposition. Case studies include free zones and automated ports around the world, satellite urbanism in South Asia, high-speed rail in Japan and the Middle East, agripoles in southern Spain, fiber optic submarine cable in East Africa, spatial products of tourism in North Korea, and management platforms of the International Organization for Standardization.

Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

CHNS 110

Elementary Modern Chinese I

Baiqian Bian, Rongzhen Li, Yu-Lin Wang Saussy, Jianhua Shen, Yongtao Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Intended for students with no background in Chinese. An intensive course with emphasis on spoken language and drills. Pronunciation, grammatical analysis, conversation practice, and introduction to reading and writing Chinese characters.

This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 112

Elementary Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Chuanmei Sun
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 AM
Fall

First level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with some aural proficiency but very limited ability in reading and writing Chinese. Training in listening and speaking, with emphasis on reading and writing.

Placement confirmed by placement test and by instructor.

China

CHNS 120

Elementary Modern Chinese II

Rongzhen Li, Jianhua Shen, Yu-Lin Wang Saussy, Yongtao Zhang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 110.

After CHNS 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 122

Elementary Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Chuanmei Sun
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 AM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 112.

China

CHNS 130

Intermediate Modern Chinese I

Rongzhen Li, Ninghui Liang, Haiwen Wang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An intermediate course that continues intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and consolidates achievements from the first year of study. Students improve oral fluency, study more complex grammatical structures, and enlarge both reading and writing vocabulary.

After CHNS 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 132

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Min Chen, Fan Liu, Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate oral proficiency and elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them.

After CHNS 122 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 140

Intermediate Modern Chinese II

Rongzhen Li, Ninghui Liang, Haiwen Wang
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 130. To be followed by CHNS 150.

After CHNS 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

China

CHNS 142

Intermediate Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Min Chen, Fan Liu, Peisong Xu
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 132.

After CHNS 132 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 150

Advanced Modern Chinese I

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Chuanmei Sun, Yu-Lin Wang Saussy, Haiwen Wang
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Third level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Use of audiovisual materials, oral presentations, skits, and longer and more frequent writing assignments to assimilate more sophisticated grammatical structures. Further introduction to a wide variety of written forms and styles. Use of both traditional and simplified forms of Chinese characters.

After CHNS 140 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 151

Advanced Modern Chinese II

Hsiu-hsien Chan, Jianhua Shen, Chuanmei Sun
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 150.

After CHNS 150 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 152

Advanced Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Yen-hao Liao, Yu-Lin Wang Saussy, Peisong Xu, Yongtao Zhang
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

The third level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate high to advanced low speaking and listening skills and with intermediate reading and writing skills. The goal of the course is to help students effectively expand their skills in reading and writing while concurrently addressing the need to improve their listening and oral skills in formal environments. The materials cover a variety of topics relating to Chinese culture, society and cultural differences, supplemented with authentic video materials.

After CHNS 142 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 153

Advanced Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Yu-Lin Wang Saussy, Peisong Xu
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

The second level of the advanced learner sequence. Intended for students with intermediate to advanced oral proficiency and high elementary reading and writing proficiency. Students receive intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, supplemented by audio and video materials. The objective of the course is to balance these four skills and work toward attaining an advanced level in all of them. 

After CHNS 152 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 158

Advanced Modern Chinese III

Ninghui Liang, William Zhou
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Fourth level of the standard foundational sequence of modern Chinese, with study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Readings in a wide range of subjects form the basis of discussion and other activities. Students consolidate their skills, especially speaking proficiency, at an advanced level. Materials use both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 151 or equivalent

China

CHNS 159

Advanced Modern Chinese III

Ninghui Liang, William Zhou
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 154.

After CHNS 154 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 162

Advanced Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers III

Wei Su
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills and with advanced low reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000–1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 153 or equivalent.

China

CHNS 163

Advanced Modern Chinese for Heritage Speakers III

Wei Su
MWF 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Third level of the advanced learner sequence in Chinese. Intended for students with advanced speaking and listening skills (able to conduct conversations fluently) and with high intermediate reading and writing skills (able to write 1,000–1,200 characters). Further readings on contemporary life in China and Taiwan, supplemented with authentic video materials. Class discussion, presentations, and regular written assignments. Texts in simplified characters with vocabulary in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 162 or equivalent

China

CHNS 164

Chinese for Reading Contemporary Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Selected readings in Chinese fiction of the 1980s and 1990s. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 165

Readings in Modern Chinese Fiction

Wei Su
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Reading and discussion of modern short stories, most written prior to 1949. Development of advanced language skills in reading, speaking, and writing for students with an interest in literature and literary criticism.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 166

Chinese for Current Affairs

William Zhou
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a strong focus on speaking and writing skills in formal style. Current affairs and issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as news and blogs on the Internet, television, film, fine arts and so on.

China

CHNS 167

Chinese for Current Affairs

William Zhou
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM; 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a strong focus on speaking and writing skills in formal style. Current affairs and issues in contemporary Chinese society explored through media forms such as news and blogs on the Internet, television, film, fine arts and so on.

China

CHNS 168

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Min Chen
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 169

Chinese for Global Enterprises

Min Chen
M,W 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Advanced language course with a focus on Chinese business terminology and discourse. Discussion of China’s economic and management reforms, marketing, economic laws, business culture and customs, and economic relations with other countries. Case studies from international enterprises that have successfully entered the Chinese market.

After CHNS 155, 162, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 170

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Pauline Lin
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, CHNS 153, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 171

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM -12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 170.

After CHNS 170.

China

CHNS 172

Chinese for Scholarly Conversation

Yongtao Zhang
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

This course aims to bring students to advanced competence in all aspects of modern Chinese, and prepare students for advanced research or employment in a variety of China-related fields. Materials include readings on contemporary social, cultural, and political issues, which are written by prominent scholar writers in related fields. This level is suitable for students who have had four years of college Chinese prior to attending, or who have taken three years of an accelerated program meant for heritage speakers.

Prerequisite: CHNS 155, CHNS 162, placement results equivalent to L5, or permission of instructor.

China

CHNS 570

Introduction to Literary Chinese I

Pauline Lin
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style.

After CHNS 151, 153, or equivalent.

China

CHNS 571

Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Pauline Lin
M,W 11:35 AM -12:50 PM
Spring

Continuation of CHNS 570.

After CHNS 570 or equivalent.

China

EALL 040

The Great Cities of Ancient China

Pauline Lin
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

What constitutes a city? What are some of the cultural beliefs, social and economic structures, and technological capacities that influenced early Chinese urban designs?  How does a dense gathering of people reshape social hierarchy? How is urban life represented in texts, image and material culture? Focusing on Chinese sites from the Neolithic to the 12th century, using textual, archaeological, and visual sources, this course explores the changing nature of urban centers and its relationship to human inhabitants. Topics include: urban revolution and the emergence of elites; art and authority; the cosmological capital of Qin Xianyang; a walk through 6th century Luoyang; foreign merchants in the Tang; and commerce and the street.

Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 200, CHNS 200, EAST 240, HUMS 270

The Chinese Tradition

Tina Lu
M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

An introduction to the literature, culture, and thought of premodern China, from the beginnings of the written record to the turn of the twentieth century. Close study of textual and visual primary sources, with attention to their historical and cultural backdrops.

Students enrolled in CHNS 200 join a weekly Mandarin-language discussion section. No knowledge of Chinese required for students enrolled in EALL 200. Students enrolled in CHNS 200 must have L5 proficiency in Mandarin or permission of the course instructor.

China

EALL 219, EAST 229, HUMS 214, PHIL 119, RLST 171

Introduction to Chinese Philosophy

Lucas Bender, Eric Greene
M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

This course represents an introduction to the most important philosophical thinkers and texts in Chinese history, ranging from roughly 500 BC–1500 AD. Topics include ethics, political philosophy, epistemology, and ontology. We discuss the basic works of Confucian and Daoist philosophers during the Warring States and early imperial eras, the continuation of these traditions in early medieval “dark learning,” Buddhist philosophy (in its original Indian context, the early period of its spread to China, and in mature Chinese Buddhist schools such as Chan/Zen), and Neo-Confucian philosophy. The course emphasizes readings in the original texts of the thinkers and traditions in question (all in English translation).

No knowledge of Chinese or previous contact with Chinese philosophy required.

China

EALL 236, LITR 181

Japanese Poetry and Poetics

Edward Kamens
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

Core concepts and traditions of classical Japanese poetry explored through the medium of translation. Readings from anthologies and treatises of the ninth through early twentieth centuries. Attention to recent critical studies in transcultural poetic theory. Inspection and discussion of related artifacts in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library and the Yale University Art Gallery

Readings and discussion in English. Previous study of literary texts is recommended but not required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 256, EAST 358, GLBL 251, HUMS 272, LITR 265

China in the World

Jing Tsu
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Recent headlines about China in the world, deciphered in both modern and historical contexts. Interpretation of new events and diverse texts through transnational connections. Topics include China and Africa, Mandarinization, labor and migration, Chinese America, nationalism and humiliation, and art and counterfeit.

Readings and discussion in English.

China

EALL 262

Natsume Soseki

Timothy Unverzagt Goddard
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

This seminar explores the oeuvre of Natsume Sōseki (1867–1916), the preeminent writer of modern Japan. Readings include a broad sampling of Sōseki’s fiction from across his career, as well as selected poems and essays. Discussions situate Sōseki’s writings in the context of Japan’s rapid modernization and imperial expansion during the Meiji period (1868–1912), and considers Sōseki’s enduring legacy in the Japanese literary canon and as a figure of world literature.

All readings are in English translation; no knowledge of Japanese is required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 265, EAST 253, LITR 251

Japanese Literature after 1970

Timothy Unverzagt Goddard
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

This course provides a survey of Japanese literature from 1970 to the present. Readings include novels and essays from a diverse range of authors, addressing themes such as identity, language, memory, domesticity, postmodernism, and racial discrimination. Students develop extensive knowledge of contemporary Japanese literature, while also cultivating skills in close reading and research methods.

All readings are in English translation; no knowledge of Japanese is required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 268

The Literature of Japanese Empire

Timothy Unverzagt Goddard
Th 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Spanning a period from the 1910s to the 1940s, this course considers the effects of Japanese imperialism on the development of modern literature in East Asia. How did authors from mainland Japan represent the so-called outer territories of the empire? How did authors from colonial Taiwan and Korea navigate issues of language, identity, and culture in their writings? What significance did the semi-colonial city of Shanghai hold in the modern literary imagination? Readings include a broad range of primary sources, including novels, short stories, essays, poems, and travelogues. We also engage with selections from recent secondary sources to understand how scholars have approached this tumultuous era in East Asian literary history. 

Knowledge of Japanese, Chinese, and Korean is not required, though students with reading ability in any of these languages will have opportunities to practice them. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 273a

Postwar Japanese Literature

Timothy Unverzagt Goddard
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

Spanning a period from 1945 to 1970, this course provides an introduction to Japanese literature after Japan’s catastrophic defeat in the Asia-Pacific War. Readings include novels, essays, and poetry by major writers of the era, including Dazai Osamu, Enchi Fumiko, Kawabata Yasunari, Mishima Yukio, and Tanizaki Jun’ichirō. In our discussions, we consider how Japanese writers responded to this moment of profound crisis, exploring such themes as identity, memory, modernity, and the nation.

All readings are in English translation; no knowledge of Japanese is required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 281, FILM 304

Japanese Cinema and Its Others

Aaron Gerow
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Critical inquiry into the myth of a homogeneous Japan through analysis of how Japanese film and media historically represents “others” of different races, ethnicities, nationalities, genders, and sexualities, including blacks, ethnic Koreans, Okinawans, Ainu, undocumented immigrants, LGBT minorities, the disabled, youth, and monstrous others like ghosts. 

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

EALL 300, EAST 340

Sinological Methods

Pauline Lin
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A research course in Chinese studies, designed for students with background in modern and literary Chinese. Explore and evaluate the wealth of primary sources and research tools available in China and in the West. For native speakers of Chinese, introduction to the secondary literature in English and instruction in writing professionally in English on topics about China. Topics include Chinese bibliographies; bibliophiles’ notes; specialized dictionaries; maps and geographical gazetteers; textual editions, variations and reliability of texts; genealogies and biographical sources; archaeological and visual materials; and major Chinese encyclopedias, compendia, and databases.

Prerequisite: CHNS 171 or equivalent. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 301

Ancient and Medieval Chinese Poetry

Lucas Bender
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Readings in ancient and middle-period Chinese poetry, from the beginnings of the tradition through the Song dynasty. 

Prerequisite: one year of classical/literary Chinese or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Permission of instructor required.

China

EALL 308

Sages of the Ancient World

Mick Hunter
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Comparative survey of the embodiment and performance of wisdom by ancient sages. Distinctive features and common themes in discourses about wisdom from China, India, the Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Topics include teaching, scheming, and dying.

China, Transregional, South Asia

EALL 351

Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese Literature

Cheng Li
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

An introduction to literary criticism and history using texts in the original language. Fiction and nonfiction written in Chinese in different parts of the world, with a focus on the period from the nineteenth century to the present. Readings in Chinese; texts in both simplified and traditional characters.

After CHNS 163, 164, 165, or equivalent. Permission of instructor requried.

China

EALL 536

Japanese Poetry and Poetics

Edward Kamens
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

Core concepts and traditions of classical Japanese poetry explored through the medium of translation. Readings from anthologies and treatises of the ninth through early twentieth century. Attention to recent critical studies in transcultural poetic theory. Inspection and discussion of related artifacts in the Beinecke Library and the Yale Art Gallery. 

Japan

EALL 562

Natsume Sōseki

Timothy Unverzagt Goddard
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

This seminar explores the oeuvre of Natsume Sōseki (1867–1916), the preeminent writer of modern Japan. Readings include a broad sampling of Sōseki’s fiction from across his career, as well as selected poems and essays. Discussions situate Sōseki’s writings in the context of Japan’s rapid modernization and imperial expansion during the Meiji period (1868–1912) and consider Sōseki’s enduring legacy in the Japanese literary canon and as a figure of world literature.

Japan

EALL 565, EAST 553

Japanese Literature after 1970

Timothy Unverzagt Goddard
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

This course provides a survey of Japanese literature from 1970 to the present. Readings include novels and essays from a diverse range of authors, addressing themes such as identity, language, memory, domesticity, postmodernism, and racial discrimination. Students develop extensive knowledge of contemporary Japanese literature, while also cultivating skills in close reading and research methods. 

All readings are in English translation; no knowledge of Japanese is required.

Japan

EALL 568

The Literature of Japanese Empire

Timothy Unverzagt Goddard
Th 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

Spanning a period from the 1910s to the 1940s, this course considers the effects of Japanese imperialism on the development of modern literature in East Asia. How did authors from mainland Japan represent the so-called outer territories of the empire? How did authors from colonial Taiwan and Korea navigate issues of language, identity, and culture in their writings? What significance did the semi-colonial city of Shanghai hold in the modern literary imagination? Readings include a broad range of primary sources, including novels, short stories, essays, poems, and travelogues. We also engage with selections from recent secondary sources to understand how scholars have approached this tumultuous era in East Asian literary history. 

Graduate students are expected to conduct research in any and all East Asian languages relevant to their topic and in which they are proficient.

Japan

EALL 573

Postwar Japanese Literature, 1945–1970

Timothy Unverzagt Goddard
W 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

Spanning a period from 1945 to 1970, this course provides an introduction to Japanese literature after Japan’s catastrophic defeat in the Asia-Pacific War. Readings include novels, essays, and poetry by major writers of the era, including Dazai Osamu, Enchi Fumiko, Kawabata Yasunari, Mishima Yukio, and Tanizaki Jun’ichirō. In our discussions, we consider how Japanese writers responded to this moment of profound crisis, exploring such themes as identity, memory, modernity, and the nation.

Japan

EALL 581, FILM 873

Japanese Cinema and Its Others

Aaron Gerow
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

A critical inquiry into the myth of a homogeneous Japan through analyzing how Japanese film and media historically represent “others” of different races, ethnicities, nationalities, genders, and sexualities, including blacks, ethnic Koreans, Okinawans, Ainu, undocumented immigrants, LGBT minorities, the disabled, youth, and “monstrous” others like ghosts.

Japan

EALL 600, EAST 640

Sinological Methods

Pauline Lin
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

A research course in Chinese studies, designed for students with background in modern and literary Chinese. Exploration and evaluation of the wealth of primary sources and research tools available in Chinese. For native speakers of Chinese, introduction to the secondary literature in English and instruction in writing professionally in English on topics about China. Topics include the compilation and development of Chinese bibli­ographies; bibliophiles’ notes; editions, censorship, and textual variation and reliability; specialized dictionaries; maps and geographical gazetteers; genealogies and biographi­cal sources; archaeological and visual materials; and major Chinese encyclopedias and compendia.

China

EALL 601

Ancient and Medieval Chinese Poetry

Lucas Bender
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Readings in ancient and middle-period Chinese poetry, from the beginnings of the tradition through the Song dynasty.

Prerequisite: one year of classical/literary Chinese or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

China

EALL 608

Sages of the Ancient World

Mick Hunter
T, Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

Comparative survey of the embodiment and performance of wisdom by ancient sages. Distinctive features and common themes in discourses about wisdom from China, India, the Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Topics include teaching, scheming, and dying.

China, Transregional

EALL 715

Readings in Modern Japanese Literature

Timothy Unverzagt Goddard
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

Readings from a selection of representative texts from modern to contemporary Japanese literature with a focus on comprehension, translation, critical reception, and close reading. Students have the opportunity to select a few texts of interest in consultation with the instructor.

Japan

EALL 761

Topics in Early Chinese Thought

Mick Hunter
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

An examination of certain key problems in the study of early Chinese thought. Top­ics vary from year to year but in general include intellectual typologies and affiliations, relating received texts and excavated manuscripts, the role of Han editors in shaping pre- Han textual traditions, ruling ideology, and comparisons with other parts of the ancient world. 

Discussions and papers are in English. Because readings are different each year, this course may be repeated for credit.

China

EALL 806, EAST 806, FILM 921

Research in Japanese Film History

Aaron Gerow
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This seminar covers the methods and problems of researching and writing Japanese film history. We review the theoretical issues involved in historiography in general and film historiography in particular, and then consider how these are pertinent to the study of Japanese cinema history. Our approach is critical, as we examine several recent examples of Japanese film historiography, as well as practical, as we explore various methods and strategies for researching Japanese film history. We particularly focus on the Japanese cinema’s historical relation to the nation, especially in terms of how cinema may help us historicize the nation, and vice versa. Students develop their own research project using the unique collections at Yale.

Knowledge of Japanese is helpful but not essential.

Japan

EAST 401, EALL 321, THST 367

Theater and Drama Traditions of China and Japan

Allison Bernard
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This seminar offers a window into Chinese and Japanese drama and theater traditions from their beginnings to the 20th century. We engage issues of dramatic texts as well as performance practices; thus, the course draws on material from theater history, performance and acting conventions, and the literary history of drama. Readings and discussions span major genres of dramatic writing and their different modes of performance, including the Chinese dramatic genres of zaju and chuanqi; Chinese performance styles of Beijing opera and Kunqu; and Japanese dramatic genres and performance practices of noh, kyogen, kabuki, and puppet theater. Throughout the course, we engage closely with dramatic texts as literature, giving detailed thematic readings to some canonical and non-canonical plays. We also consider how dramatic writing and theatrical performance relate to broader trends in sociopolitical history and literary history, exploring how dramatic texts and theatrical performance embody a multivalent and multisensory space that is unique among creative enterprises. We deal with both the actor and the text, and consider how each are conditioned by modern and premodern contexts. 

No prerequisites are required, although some prior knowledge of China or Japan is helpful. Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Transregional

EAST 403, HIST 315J

Japan and Germany, 1860 to the Present

This course examines the histories of Japan and Germany from the founding of the two as modern nation states through the present. Relatively latecomers compared to supposedly “normal” nation states like the United States, France, and the United Kingdom, both societies followed similar, sometimes connected paths. The course introduces students to connections between East Asia and Europe through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and explores how the specific parallels and entanglements between Japan and Germany shaped the histories of both regions. The course emphasizes themes of race, gender, and empire. Students engage with texts in history, sociology, and anthropology to answer key questions about Japanese and German history with particular emphasis on the question: is there something “peculiar” about their histories that led them to similar outcomes?

Permission of instructor required.

Japan, Transregional

EAST 404, HIST 305J, RLST 359

Faith in Law in East Asia: Beginnings to 1800

Philip Gant
T 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

This course investigates law in East Asia from ancient times to 1800 from the perspective of belief. We debate treatises, codes, cases, and cultural products from across East Asia’s legal traditions, tracing the lives they took on. We work to understand firsthand law in its diverse contexts. More fundamentally, we consider the many ways in which people formed beliefs about what “law” might be or do. We examine the philosophical and faith traditions—and the hopes and fears—through which law was articulated, justified, realized, and then immediately contested. Throughout, we ask: What does it mean to invest law with one’s faith? How much of one’s belief is law? How much does law depend on one’s belief? What gave people pause about this over time? You develop your own answers, with an eye toward how all of this has been understood, misunderstood, and appropriated across cultures and time. So the next time you hear an analyst or government official explain something in East Asia as rooted in “a Confucian disdain for law,” or “Japanese ‘Justice,’” (feat. in NYT) you will be equipped to strike up a conversation about just how they arrived at that belief.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 412, RLST 417

Mummies, Ghost, and Relics: Understandings of the Sacred Dead


HTBA
Spring

The objective of this course is to examine how Buddhist cultures perceive of death—conceptually and physically through corpses, mummies, ghosts, and relics—using secondary scholarship in English on Buddhist sutras, popular stories, oral traditions, and material objects. The readings, which span across China, India, Japan, and Taiwan, show that there is great variance in how the bodies of the dead, whole or fragmented, are enshrined, worshipped, and written about. There are distinct parallels, as well. This course teaches students about Buddhist practices in which the body is preserved and enshrined, in part or whole; it addresses issues of gender and the body, ritual killing of the dead, theft of corpses, and other thought-provoking topics related to the sacred dead. This course is designed to answer questions, such as: What can we learn from the skeletons of the past that is not always present in books? Why would monks go to such lengths to preserve the dried body of a fellow monk? Why would some monks knowingly starve themselves? What makes someone a buddha? Can a female become a buddha? And, what happens to the souls of young children and fetuses in the afterworld? 

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

EAST 413, HIST 381J

Writing the Rise and Fall of the Qin Empire


M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This course is a survey of the history of the Qin empire from its pre-imperial origins to its fall in 207 BCE—with a twist. We learn about the Qin, but we also use the Qin as a case study for the writing of East Asian history. How do we know what we know about the past? What assumptions are we making when we read a primary document? What’s the difference between primary and secondary sources? Instead of beginning with survey materials written by scholars, we start with so-called primary sources (in translation). We then look at excavated materials. With new materials coming to light nearly every month, the study of the Qin empire is an exciting and quickly changing field of study. There is likely be new evidence published during the course of the semester.

Permission of instructor required.

China

EAST 416, HIST 386J

Childhood and Domesticity in East Asia

Na Sil Heo
HTBA
Spring

This course offers an overview of burgeoning studies of childhood and domesticity in East Asia to get us to think about childhood and domesticity as methodologies of studying East Asia and history in general. Instead of learning about children “as they were,” this course examines how childhood and domesticity were socially constructed. East Asia is our geographical focus, although this course also introduces students to relevant key works in studies of childhood in the United States and Europe. This course focuses on several key questions. How do studies of childhood and domesticity enhance, challenge, and/or broaden our understanding of East Asia? How were normative conceptions of childhood, domesticity, and family constructed and challenged throughout the 20th century? How does scholarship on childhood and domesticity help us understand our own experiences of childhood, family, and homes? How can we make connections between the familiar/mundane everyday life with more explicitly political issues, such as wars and economy? Through a transnational approach, we situate East Asia within the global, transnational circulation of ideas, people, money, and practices that continue to shape how we perceive and experience our childhood, family, and domesticity. 

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 418, EALL 218

Chinese Media and Popular Culture


HTBA
Spring

This course aims to examine stories we tell ourselves about China. How do popular fictions, films, search engines, and social media shape the concept of China? What are the social, technological, political, and economic contexts of Chinese media and communication systems? Why do the U. S. media produce either a “sunshine” or a “noir” version of the Chinese state? How do international politics influence the transnational circulation of cultural products from China? As a broad, accessible course on contemporary China (1979-), this course introduces salient themes in the studies of the political economy of Chinese popular culture.

Permission of instructor required.

China

EAST 470

Independent Study

Valerie Hansen
HTBA
Fall

For students with advanced Chinese, Japanese, or Korean language skills who wish to pursue a close study of the East Asia region, not otherwise covered by departmental offerings. May be used for research, a special project, or a substantial research paper under faculty supervision. A term paper or its equivalent and regular meetings with an adviser are required. Ordinarily only one term may be offered toward the major or for credit toward the degree. 

Permission to enroll requires submission of a detailed project proposal, signed by the adviser, by the end of the first week of classes and its approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 470

Independent Study

Valerie Hansen
HTBA
Spring

For students with advanced Chinese, Japanese, or Korean language skills who wish to pursue a close study of the East Asia region, not otherwise covered by departmental offerings. May be used for research, a special project, or a substantial research paper under faculty supervision. A term paper or its equivalent and regular meetings with an adviser are required. Ordinarily only one term may be offered toward the major or for credit toward the degree. 

Permission to enroll requires submission of a detailed project proposal, signed by the adviser, by the end of the first week of classes and its approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 480

One-Term Senior Essay

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

Permission required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 491

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 492

Senior Research Project

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable.

Permission required. Credit only on completion of both terms.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 900

Master's Thesis

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 900

Master’s Thesis

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 910

Independent Study

By arrangement with faculty and with approval of the DGS.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

EAST 910

Independent Study

By arrangement with faculty and with approval of the DGS.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

GLBL 376

Asia Now: Human Rights, Globalization, Cultural Conflicts

Jing Tsu
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

This course examines contemporary and global issues in Asia (east, southeast, northeast, south), in a historical and interdisciplinary context, that include international law, policy debates, cultural issues, security, military history, media, science and technology, and cyber warfare. Course is co-taught with a guest professor. 

Permission of instructor required.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia, Southeast Asia

GLBL 552

Asia Now: Human Rights, Globalization, Cultural Conflicts

Jing Tsu
T 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Spring

This course examines contemporary and global issues in Asia (east, southeast, northeast, south), in a historical and interdisciplinary context that includes international law, policy debates, cultural issues, security, military history, media, science and technology, and cyber warfare.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional

GLBL 616

China’s Rise and the Future of Foreign Policy

David Rank
Th 9:25 AM - 11:15 AM
Fall

China’s return to its traditional role as a regional—and, increasingly, global—power has implications for the political, security, and economic structures that have been the foundation of the international system since the end of the Second World War. This course looks at the impact China’s ascent has had, the challenges a rising China will pose for policy makers in the years ahead, and the internal issues China will need to address in the years ahead. It does so from the perspective of a practitioner who spent nearly three decades working on U.S. foreign policy and U.S.-China relations.

China

HIST 030, EAST 030

Tokyo

Daniel Botsman
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Four centuries of Japan’s history explored through the many incarnations, destructions, and rebirths of its foremost city. Focus on the solutions found by Tokyo’s residents to the material and social challenges of concentrating such a large population in one place. Tensions between continuity and impermanence, authenticity and modernity, and social order and the culture of play.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required. Permission of instructor required.

Japan

HIST 302J

Korea and the Japanese Empire in Critical Contexts

Hannah Shepherd
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This course addresses critical moments of contact, conflict, and connection in the modern histories of Korea and Japan. Each week our discussion and readings focus on a specific event, before looking at the wider contexts involved and historical debates they have produced. This is not a comparative study of the histories of the different countries, but a chance to focus on themes—nationalism, colonial oppression, collaboration, war, identity—which continue to shape both relations between Japan, South Korea and North Korea, and the work of historians today.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan, Korea, Transregional

HIST 303J, EAST 303

Hong Kong and China: A Cross-Border History

Denise Ho
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

This departmental seminar studies the historical development of Hong Kong and China in relation to each other, from the colonial and late imperial experience to their shared histories in national and political movements, from postwar industrialization to reform-era economic growth, culminating in the 1997 handover and its attendant political and economic integration. The readings from the first half of the semester come primarily from the literature in history, while the readings in the second half draw from anthropology, economics, political science, and sociology. Each week readings include primary sources in or translated into English.

Permission of instructor required.

China

HIST 307, EAST 301

The Making of Japan's Great Peace, 1550-1850

Fabian Drixler
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Fall

Examination of how, after centuries of war in Japan and overseas, the Tokugawa shogunate built a peace that lasted more than 200 years. Japan’s urban revolution, the eradication of Christianity, the Japanese discovery of Europe, and the question whether Tokugawa Japan is a rare example of a complex and populous society that achieved ecological sustainability.

Japan

HIST 309J, EAST 309

Uses of the Past in Modern China

Denise Ho
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Modern China’s use of the past in state-sponsored narratives of nation, in attempts to construct heritage by elites and intellectuals, and in grassroots projects of remembrance. Theories on history and memory; primary sources in English translation; case studies from twentieth-century China. Interdisciplinary readings in art history, anthropology, cultural studies, and history.

Permission of instructor required.

China

HIST 319J, EAST 319

Tokugawa Japan and the Human Condition

Fabian Drixler
W 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Spring

An exploration of what Tokugawa Japan can teach us about shared human challenges and the diverse solutions different societies have found for them. Topics include standards of physical beauty; loyalty; romantic love; naming and the power of words; animals, infants, and the boundaries of humanity; unspeakable truths and open secrets; concealed power and the power of concealment; permissible violence; acceptable disasters; and the relationship of the living with the dead. In their coursework, students are invited to draw on their knowledge of other times and places as they put Tokugawa Japan in comparative perspective.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

HIST 321, EAST 220

China from Present to Past

Valerie Hansen
T,Th 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Underlying causes of current issues facing China traced back to their origins in the premodern period. Topics include economic development, corruption, environmental crises, gender, and Pacific island disputes. Selected primary-source readings in English, images, videos, and Web resources.

China

HIST 321J

Exploring the Silk Road

Valerie Hansen
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

A journey along the overland and sea routes that connected China, India, and Iran from 200-1000 CE and served as conduits for cultural exchange. The lives of merchants, envoys, pilgrims, and travelers interacting in cosmopolitan communities. Exploration of long-known and newly discovered archaeological ruins, along with primary sources in translation.

Permission of instructor required.

China, Transregional, South Asia

HIST 353

20th Century Japan: Empire & Aftermath

Hannah Shepherd
T,Th 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

In 1905, in a victory which shocked the world, Japan defeated Imperial Russia in a regional conflict over control of Korea. To many in Asia and the non-Western world, Japan looked like a new model of anti-Western, anti-imperial modernity. However, the ensuing decades would see this image contested. The expansion of Japan’s political and economic power into East Asia over the first half of the twentieth century has shaped the region in ways still visible today. This course is split into three parts, each covering roughly two decades. First, we look at the legacies of Japan’s Meiji Restoration and the development of what has been called an “Imperial Democracy” in early 20th century Japan. Next, we look at the crises which rocked Japan in the 1930s and marked a new era. Finally, we deal with the aftermath of empire—both in the immediate “postwar” era for Japan, and in the debates over imperial legacies and history which still reverberate in Japan and many of its former colonies today.

Japan

HIST 375, EAST 375

China from Mao to Now

Denise Ho
T,Th 11:35 AM - 12:50 PM
Spring

The history of the People’s Republic of China from Mao to now, with a focus on understanding the recent Chinese past and framing contemporary events in China in historical context. How the party-state is organized; interactions between state and society; causes and consequences of economic disparities; ways in which various groups—from intellectuals to religious believers—have shaped the meaning of contemporary Chinese society.

China

HIST 800, ENGL 503, MDVL 565

Circa 1000

Valerie Hansen, Emily Thornbury
M 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Fall

The world in the year 1000, when the different regions of the world participated in complex networks. Archaeological excavations reveal that the Vikings reached L’Anse aux Meadows, Canada, at roughly the same time that the Kitan people defeated China’s Song dynasty and established a powerful empire stretching across the grasslands of Eurasia. Europeans tried to figure out whether the Vikings were a sign of Doomsday, and if so, whether a series of cultural experiments might stave off the end-time, even as the Icelanders tried to decide whether they wanted to be European. In this seminar, students read interpretative texts based on archaeology and primary sources, prepare projects in teams, work with material culture, and develop skills of cross-cultural analysis. Mandatory field trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York on the second Saturday of the fall term.

China, Transregional

HIST 884

Readings in the History of Modern Japan

Daniel Botsman
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This course offers students an opportunity to explore recent English-language scholarship on the history of modern Japan (post-1868).

Japan

HIST 889, EAST 889

Research in Japanese History

Daniel Botsman, Fabian Drixler, Hannah Shepherd
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

After a general introduction to the broad array of sources and reference materials available for conducting research related to the history of Japan since ca. 1600, students prepare original research papers on topics of their own choosing in a collaborative workshop environment.

Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Japanese.

Japan

HIST 892, EALL 874

China at Its Borders

Denise Ho
F 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This reading seminar examines recent English-language scholarship on China’s engagement with the world, focusing on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Weekly topics include the following themes: frontiers and borders, the region as a unit of analysis, trading systems and regulation, migration and diaspora, models of modernity and revolution, World War II and the Cold War, socialist internationalism, the era of reform and opening, and China’s global ambitions today.

China

HSAR 357

Arts of Japan I

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
T,Th 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Survey of major monuments in the visual arts of ancient and early medieval Japan with attention to the conditions and thought worlds of cultural production. Emphasis on the arts practices and philosophies of Buddhism and Shintō in juxtaposition with the courtly arts from narrative handscrolls to integrations of poetry and painting in landscape screens and picture albums.

Japan

HSAR 457

Japanese Gardens

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Arts and theory of the Japanese garden with emphasis on the role of the anthropogenic landscape from aesthetics to environmental precarity, including the concept of refugium. Case studies of influential Kyoto gardens from the 11th through 15th centuries, and their significance as cultural productions with ecological implications. 

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

JAPN 110

Elementary Japanese I

Hiroyo Nishimura, Mari Stever, Mika Yamaguchi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Introductory language course for students with no previous background in Japanese. Development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, including 50 hiragana, 50 katakana, and 75 kanji characters. Introduction to cultural aspects such as levels of politeness and group concepts. In-class drills in pronunciation and conversation. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 120

Elementary Japanese II

Kumiko Nakamura, Hiroyo Nishimura, Mari Stever
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 110, with supplementary materials such as excerpts from television shows, anime, and songs. Introduction of 150 additional kanji.

After JAPN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 130

Intermediate Japanese I

Kumiko Nakamura
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

Continued development in both written and spoken Japanese. Aspects of Japanese culture, such as history, art, religion, and cuisine, explored through text, film, and animation. Online audio and visual aids facilitate listening, as well as the learning of grammar and kanji. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 140

Intermediate Japanese II

Mika Yamaguchi
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 130.

After JAPN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 150

Advanced Japanese I

Mari Stever
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Fall

Advanced language course that further develops proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Reading and discussion materials include works by Nobel Prize winners. Japanese anime and television dramas are used to enhance listening and to develop skills in culturally appropriate speech. Writing of essays, letters, and criticism solidifies grammar and style. Individual tutorial sessions improve conversational skills.

After JAPN 140 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 151

Advanced Japanese II

Hiroyo Nishimura
T,Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 150.

After JAPN 150 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 156

Advanced Japanese III

Mika Yamaguchi
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Fall

Close reading of modern Japanese writing on current affairs, social science, history, and literature. Development of speaking and writing skills in academic settings, including formal speeches, interviews, discussions, letters, e-mail, and expository writing. Interviews of and discussions with native speakers on current issues. Individual tutorial sessions provide speaking practice.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 157

Advanced Japanese IV

Mika Yamaguchi
M,W 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Spring

Continuation of JAPN 156.

After JAPN 156 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Japan

JAPN 170

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Edward Kamens
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

JAPN 570

Introduction to Literary Japanese

Edward Kamens
T,Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts.

After JAPN 151 or equivalent.

Japan

KREN 110

Elementary Korean I

Angela Lee-Smith, Hyun Sung Lim
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

A beginning course in modern Korean. Pronunciation, lectures on grammar, conversation practice, and introduction to the writing system (Hankul).

This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 120

Elementary Korean II

Seungja Choi, Hyun Sung Lim
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM, 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 110.

After KREN 110 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 130

Intermediate Korean I

Seungja Choi
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

Continued development of skills in modern Korean, spoken and written, leading to intermediate-level proficiency.

After KREN 120 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 132

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners I

Seungja Choi, Hyun Sung Lim
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Fall

Intended for students with some oral proficiency but little or no training in Hankul. Focus on grammatical analysis, the standard spoken language, and intensive training in reading and writing.

This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 140

Intermediate Korean II

Hyun Sung Lim
M,T,W,Th,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 130.

After KREN 130 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 142

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Learners II

Angela Lee-Smith
M,T,W,Th,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Spring

Continuation of KREN 132.

After KREN 132 or equivalent. This course meets during reading period.

Korea

KREN 150

Advanced Korean I: Korean Language and Culture through K-Pop Music

Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Fall

An advanced language course with emphasis on developing vocabulary and grammar, practice reading comprehension, speaking on a variety of topics, and writing in both formal and informal styles. Use storytelling, discussion, peer group activities, audio and written journals, oral presentations, and supplemental audiovisual materials and texts in class. Intended for nonheritage speakers.

After KREN 140 or equivalent

Korea

KREN 151

Advanced Korean II: Language and Culture through Media

Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM
Spring

This course is content and project-based to further develop integrated language skills-spoken and written, including grammar and vocabulary, as well as intercultural competence through Korean media. Through a variety of media, such as print media, publishing, digital media, cinema, broadcasting (radio, television, podcasting), and advertising, students explore and reflect on a wide range of topics and perspectives in Korean culture and society. The course learning activities include interactive, interpretive, and presentational communication; critical analysis; creative and authentic language applications in formal/informal contexts. 

After KREN 150 or equivalent.

Korea

KREN 152

Advanced Korean for Advanced Learners

Angela Lee-Smith
M,W,F 11:35 AM - 12:25 PM
Fall

An advanced course in modern Korean. Reading of short stories, essays, and journal articles, and introduction of 200 Chinese characters. Students develop their speaking and writing skills through discussions and written exercises.

After KREN 142 or 151, or with permission of instructor.

Korea

KREN 154

Advanced Korean III

Seungja Choi
T, Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Spring

An advanced language course designed to develop reading and writing skills using Web-based texts in a variety of genres. Students read texts independently and complete comprehension and vocabulary exercises through the Web. Discussions, tests, and intensive writing training in class.

After KREN 152 or equivalent.

Korea

LAW 21179, GLBL 624

Contemporary China Research Seminar

Research and writing on contemporary problems related to China, including but not limited to legal issues. The class meets roughly six times during the term to discuss particular China-related issues (occasionally with a guest) and at the end of the term for student presentations of their research. The remainder of the term, students work on their research and writing projects and individually meet with the instructors to discuss their work. 

Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. Permission of the instructors required. Prerequisite (non-Law students): in addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a statement of interest explaining their background related to China and research ideas they are considering no later than 4:30 p.m. on October 29, 2019. Decisions on admission to the class will be made primarily on the basis of the statements.

China

LITR 402, ENGL 329, HSAR 441, HUMS 371

The Picturebook: Euro-American and Japanese Traditions

Katie Trumpener, Honglan Huang
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Examines the form, history, and preoccupations of the picturebook form from the eighteenth century to the present, juxtaposing Euro-American with Japanese picturebook traditions.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan, Transregional

PLSC 162

Japan and the World

Frances McCall Rosenbluth
W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

The historical development of Japan’s international relations since the late Tokugawa period; World War II and its legacy; domestic institutions and foreign policy; implications for the United States; and interactions between nationalism and regionalism.

Permission of instructor required.

Japan

PLSC 357, EAST 310, GLBL 309

The Rise of China

Daniel Mattingly
HTBA
Spring

Analysis of contemporary Chinese politics, with focus on how the country has become a major power and how the regime has endured. Topics include China’s recent history, state, ruling party, economy, censorship, elite politics, and foreign policy.

China

PLSC 678, GLBL 678

Japan and the World

The historical development of Japan’s international relations since the late Tokugawa period; World War II and its legacy; domestic institutions and foreign policy; implications for the United States; and interactions between nationalism and regionalism.

Japan

REL 616

Introduction to East Asian Theologies

Chloe Starr
T 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This course introduces a range of theological themes and key thinkers in twentieth- and twenty-first century Japan, Taiwan, and Korea. It surveys different theological movements within these countries (such as “homeland theology,” Minjung theology, the “no-church” movement, etc.) and encourages a critical response to the challenges that these theologies raise for Christians in Asia and elsewhere. The course considers contextualization and inculturation debates in each of these societies, as well as regional responses to Christianity. We read primary texts in English, with background reading for context, and students are encouraged to develop their own responses to the authors and their thought (e.g., students may submit theological reflections to count toward their grade).

Japan, Korea, Transregional, Taiwan

REL 917

East Asian Religions and Ecology

John Grim, Mary Evelyn Tucker
T 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Spring

This course introduces students to Asian religious traditions and their intersection with ecology. The first half of the course explores the South Asian religious traditions of Hinduism, Jainism, and Buddhism. The second half examines the East Asian religious traditions of Confucianism, Daoism, and East Asian Buddhism. These traditions are studied in the context of the emerging field of religion and ecology. The course identifies developments in religious traditions that highlight their ecological implications for the contemporary period. In particular, it relates religious concepts, textual analysis, ritual activities, and institutional formations to engaged, on-the-ground environmental projects. It investigates the symbolic and lived expressions in religious ethics and practices that can be defined as religious ecologies. Similarly, it identifies narratives in South Asian religious traditions and in East Asian religious traditions that orient humans to the cosmos, namely, religious cosmologies. This interrelationship of narratives and religious environmentalism provides pathways into the study of religion and ecology. At present the rapid modernization in South Asia and East Asia is causing extreme environmental problems, and we investigate Asian religions in relation to this ecological crisis. Both the problems and promise of religions are acknowledged. Religions are now widely seen as significant social, intellectual, and spiritual forces that both shape and are shaped by cultural worldviews. Moreover, the symbolic language of religions often evokes nature’s processes and reflects nature’s rhythms. The multiform roles of religions, then, provide historical sources for reflection upon human behavior guided by values embedded in individuals and social bodies, projected onto ecosystems, and molded into cosmological narratives.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

RLST 121, EALL 296, EAST 391

Religion and Culture in Korea

Hwansoo Kim
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

Introduction to Shamanism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Christianity, and new religions in Korea from ancient times to the present. Examination of religious traditions in close relationships with social, economic, political, and cultural environments in Korean society. Examination of religious tensions, philosophical arguments, and ethical issues that indigenous and foreign religions in Korea have engaged throughout history to maximize their influence in Korean society.  

Permission of instructor required.

Korea

RLST 175, EAST 431

North Korea and Religion

Hwansoo Kim
M 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

Ever since the establishment of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) in 1948 and the Korean War (1950–1953), North Korea has been depicted by the media as a reclusive, oppressive, and military country, its leaders as the worst dictators, and its people as brainwashed, tortured, and starving to death. The still ongoing Cold War discourse, intensified by the North Korea’s recent secret nuclear weapons program, furthers these negative images, and outsiders have passively internalized these images. However, these simplistic characterizations prevent one from gaining a balanced understanding of and insight into North Korea and its people on the ground. Topics other than political, military, and security issues are rarely given attention. On the whole, even though North Korea’s land area is larger than South Korea and its population of 25 million accounts for a third of all Koreans, North Korea has been neglected in the scholarly discussion of Korean culture. This class tries to make sense of North Korea in a more comprehensive way by integrating the political and economic with social, cultural, and religious dimensions. In order to accomplish this objective, students examine leadership, religious (especially cultic) aspects of the North Korean Juche ideology, the daily lives of its citizens, religious traditions, the Korean War, nuclear development and missiles, North Korean defectors and refugees, human rights, Christian missionary organizations, and unification, among others. Throughout, the course places North Korean issues in the East Asian and global context. The course draws upon recent scholarly books, articles, journals, interviews with North Korean defectors, travelogues, media publications, and visual materials.

Permission of instructor required.

Korea

RLST 486, EALL 221

Introduction to Chinese Buddhist Literature

Eric Greene
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This class is an introduction to Chinese Buddhist literature. Although written in classical Chinese, Buddhist texts in China were written in a particular idiom that was much influenced by the Indian languages and which can be difficult to understand without special training. This class introduces students who already have some reading ability in literary Chinese to this idiom and the tools and background knowledge needed to read and understand Chinese Buddhist literature. We read a series of selections of some of the most influential Chinese Buddhist texts from various genres including canonical scriptures, apocryphal scriptures, monastic law, doctrinal treatises, and hagiography. Secondary readings introduce the basic ideas of Indian and Chinese Buddhist thought to the extent necessary for understanding our readings. 

Prerequisite: CHNS 171 (Literary Chinese II) or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Students of Japanese or Korean literature who can read basic kanbun or gugyeol are also welcome to enroll; no knowledge of modern, spoken Chinese is required. Permission of instructor required.

China

RLST 568, EALL 521

Introduction to Chinese Buddhist Literature

Eric Greene
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Fall

This class is an introduction to Chinese Buddhist literature. Although written in classical Chinese, Buddhist texts in China were written in a particular idiom that was much influenced by the Indian languages and which can be difficult to understand without special training. This class introduces students who already have some reading ability in literary Chinese to this idiom and the tools and background knowledge needed to read and understand Chinese Buddhist literature. We read a series of selections of some of the most influential Chinese Buddhist texts from various genres including canonical scriptures, apocryphal scriptures, monastic law, doctrinal treatises, and hagiography. Secondary readings introduce the basic ideas of Indian and Chinese Buddhist thought to the extent necessary for understanding our readings.

Prerequisite: CHNS 571 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Students of Japanese or Korean literature who can read basic kanbun or gugyeol are also welcome to enroll; no knowledge of modern, spoken Chinese is required.

China

RLST 574

Chinese Buddhist Texts

Eric Greene
HTBA
Spring

Close reading of selected Chinese Buddhist texts in the original.

China

RLST 598, EAST 511

Modern Korean Buddhism from Sri Lanka to Japan

Hwansoo Kim
Th 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Spring

This course situates modern Korean Buddhism in the global context of the late nineteenth century to the present. Through critical examination of the dynamic relationship between Korean Buddhism and the Buddhisms of key East Asian cities—Shanghai, Tokyo, Taipei, and Lhasa—the course seeks to understand modern East Asian Buddhism in a transnational light. Discussion includes analyzing the impact of Christian missionaries, pan-Asian and global ideologies, colonialism, Communism, capitalism, war, science, hypermodernity, and atheism.

China, Japan, Korea, Transregional, South Asia

SOCY 081, ER&M 081, MUSI 081

Race and Place in British New Wave, K-Pop, and Beyond

Grace Kao
M,W 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Spring

This seminar introduces you to several popular musical genres and explores how they are tied to racial, regional, and national identities. We examine how music is exported via migrants, return migrants, industry professionals, and the nation-state (in the case of Korean Popular Music, or K-Pop). Readings and discussions focus primarily on the British New Wave (from about 1979 to 1985) and K-Pop (1992-present), but we also discuss first-wave reggae, ska, rocksteady from the 1960s-70s, British and American punk rock music (1970s-1980s), the precursors of modern K-Pop, and have a brief discussion of Japanese City Pop. The class focuses mainly on the British New Wave and K-Pop because these two genres of popular music have strong ties to particular geographic areas, but they became or have become extremely popular in other parts of the world. We also investigate the importance of music videos in the development of these genres.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required. Permission of instructor required.

Korea, Transregional