Gento Kato

Gento Kato's picture
Japan Foundation CGP Postdoctoral Associate and Lecturer in East Asian Studies (September 2021 - May 2022)
Institution: 
Nazarbayev University
Areas of interest : 
Political Behavior; Japanese Politics; American Politics; Political Methodology
Region: 
Japan

Gento Kato is a political scientist of information, voting, and public opinion. His specialties are in political behavior under Japanese and American contexts, political psychology, formal modeling, experiments, and quantitative methodologies. His recent works particularly explore the mechanism of voter decision-making under low information. For example, his Ph.D. dissertation chapter, “When Strategic Uninformed Abstention Improves Accountability,” utilizes a formal model to suggest the need for careful assessment of the connection between political information and voter competence. It reveals that, depending on the information environment in elections, uninformed voting can be effective in inducing democratically “good” outcomes. His other recent works use survey experiments on Japanese voters to assess the role of information environments in explaining policy attitudes formation.

He is currently an Assistant Professor at the Department of Political Science and International Relations at Nazarbayev University located in Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan. Before joining Nazarbayev University, he earned a Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Davis in 2020. He also received an M.A. in political science from Waseda University in 2015 and a B.A. in politics from International Christian University, Tokyo in 2012. Before entering college, He grew up in Kobe, Japan.

Courses

PLSC 162

Japan and the World

The historical development of Japan’s international relations since the late Tokugawa period; World War II and its legacy; domestic institutions and foreign policy; implications for the United States; and interactions between nationalism and regionalism.

Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
PLSC 678, GLBL 678

Japan and the World

The historical development of Japan’s international relations since the late Tokugawa period; World War II and its legacy; domestic institutions and foreign policy; implications for the United States; and interactions between nationalism and regionalism.

Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: W 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM