CEAS Colloquium Series

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Lecture in Chinese “湖南省博物馆藏品、展览与湖湘考古新发现 “

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

An image of the Gelugpa founder Tsongkhapa, cast in the exotic astadhatu alloy in 1781 as a copy of a golden image sent to the Qing court by the Panchen Lama speaks to the claim that Buddhist images gain power through displacement, by representing what is elsewhere or even nowhere. In the 18th-century Qing court in Beijing and even in China’s southern cities, Buddhist images of foreign make, exotic manufacture, or mysterious, self-generated origin figured in a self-conscious connoisseurial culture that asked where they had been made and when. The flood of images from Tibet and Mongolia...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Lecture in Chinese The purpose of this lecture is to trace the literary education of the Ming-Qing writer Li Yu (李渔), whose works of drama were known for a playful and colloquial style that was extremely appealing to the popular audience. Li Yu, a genius, always believed that good literature was a product of literary talent. But in his lecture, Prof. Guo Yingde will demonstrate how most of Li Yu’s literary accomplishment could be traced back to the richness of his literary education, which consisted of a solid background in traditional poetry, classical prose, the eight-part (“contemporary...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Seen in spatial terms, the Meiji Restoration was less a quick coup d’etat than a centuries-long project of rehabilitating an ancient map for modern purposes. Beginning with Hideyoshi and Ieyasu, central power-holders had recruited classical geography to the cause of administrative reform. By the nineteenth century, this classicizing strategy was embraced and carried forward not only at the center but by leading lights in the region itself. Drawing on the cartography of Shinano Province (Nagano Prefecture), this illustrated talk traces the continuing career of the classical court’s most...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Lu Xun (1881-1936) is a misleading and “dangerous’ thinker. If we read his writings without paying too much attention to its concrete historical background, then we very often get the impression that he is talking about today’s Chinese society. This might be the reason why last year some of his essays were removed from schoolbooks on the mainland. His “Memory of Liu Hezhen” for instance reads today as if written after June 4th. The lecture tries to show why the writings of Lu Xun do not fit into the policy of China any more.

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

This paper discusses electronic poetry featuring aspects of the Chinese language, including original Chinese language works, Chinese translations of western works, as well as interactive e-poems that can be displayed in various languages. The emphasis is on ways in which aspects of the Chinese language are used to produce poetic experiences that rely less on the semantic value of words and more on visual stimuli and unconventional sound effects. Visual techniques to be showcased include the “textual morphing” of western writing into Chinese writing and back, used in the work of John Cayley;...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

The metaphor of the “birth of cinema” (eiga tanjô) enjoys great popularity in Japan, as the long list of books that carries it in their titles suggest. Most Japanese film histories follow an evolutionary model in their descriptions of Japanese cinema’s development. After its “birth” (respectively importation) and its “cradle years” as primitive side-show cinema matured and developed into the “seventh art”.In this presentation I will address the problems that this teleological model poses - with respect to the rich and diverse traditions of moving images projected on screen in Japan that...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Dai Zhen (1724-1777), a leading scholar of the Qianlong era, criticized the Confucian orthodoxy for “killing people in the name of principle”. In his talk Torbjörn Lodén will analyze Dai Zhen’s criticism and compare it to the criticism formulated by Wang Yangming (1472-1529) and his followers. On the basis of this comparative analysis he will discuss the relationship between the meaning and function of Confucian ideas as an important aspect of the social dynamics of Confucianism in Chinese history.

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Taking Jean-Paul Sartre’s provocative question “What is Literature?” as a point of departure, this lecture will explore the parameters of Sinophone literature in the emergent field of Sinophone Studies, which is the study of Sinitic-language cultures and communities on the margins of China and Chineseness. Shu-mei Shih teaches at UCLA and is the author of The Lure of the Modern: Writing Modernism in Semicolonial China, 1917-1937 (2001) and Visuality and Identity: Sinophone Articulations across the Pacific (2007). She is also the co-editor of Minor Transnationalism (2005) and The...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

This talk will explore the issues surrounding the North Korean nuclear programs, focusing on what we know and what we don’t know. In addition, this talk will assess the role of the Six Party Talks, and ask – and attempt to answer – some basic questions about North Korea, such as whether Kim Jong-il truly intends to give up his nuclear program, and whether a lasting peace on the peninsula is possible.

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

During the period of Mongol suzerainty of Koryô (1270-1368), Korean literati found themselves caught between a commitment to a universal order symbolized by the Yuan empire and a sense of belonging to a particular socio-political and cultural collectivity represented by the Koryô kingdom. How such literati as Yi Chehyôn and Yi Kok endeavored to reconcile these divided loyalties reflected their particular historical circumstances but also showed interesting parallels with how Korean intellectuals of the 20th century grappled with similar problems under Japanese colonialism.

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

The lecture will be include three main topics: 1. A brief history of Tibetan Buddhism. 2. The subject and aesthetics expression of Tibetan Buddhist art. 3. Tibetan Buddhist artistic development: styles, sources and schools.

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Jeffrey Wasserstrom is the author of works such as China’s Brave New World–And Other Tales for Global Times (2007), and a frequent contributor to newspapers (such as the Los Angeles Times), magazines (such as the Nation), and blogs (such as “The China Beat”). In July, he will start a term as the Editor of the Journal of Asian Studies. For More Information http://www.faculty.uci.edu/profile.cfm?faculty_id=5310

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Globalization has been a trend in manufacturing industry. Necessary functions of manufacturing industry such as research and development, product development, and commercial production are in many cases located in different countries which hold diversified cultures.Ethnic or national culture is reflected on management style as well as on features of technology. To be successful in global operation, mutual trust among host government, management staff and employees serves as a key.Each country holds expertise of different nature. The US is featured with systemic technology. Japanese technology...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Political ideology in ancient Japan was not limited to divine imperial ancestry as spelled out in the Kojiki and Nihon shoki. Mytho-history constituted only one phase or layer of multiple ways of symbolizing Yamato’s new ruling authority; and vertical sacralization was only half of its message. Posthumous names for rulers also reveal alternate, patterned ways in which individual reigns were conceived and represented. Daoist symbols were used; some rulers presented themselves as servants of the Buddha. Finally, the new palace-cities of Fujiwara-kyō and Heijō-kyō were designed to give spatial...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

In 1876 the Japanese government installed an Army Medical Inspector General as the central authority for the physical examination of conscripts, all twenty-year-old men. This move by the Japanese state and, by extension, the imperial armed forces established the notion that membership in the body politic hinged upon true manhood, which then manifested itself only in men who could and were willing to fight.Today’s military is no longer tied in with the body politic in the manner of the imperialist state. Members of the Japanese Self-Defense Forces labor in the name of a state that is...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

In the winter of 1909, at the height of Japan’s informal rule in Korea, the protectorate government sent the Korean emperor Sunjong (r. 1907-1910) on an extended tour of the provinces. A reinvention of the traditional royal progresses of the Chosŏn dynasty, what was intended to be an exercise in promoting the residency-general’s policies through the throne sparked a series of acts of resistance that culminated in a major confrontation in the peninsula’s northwest. This paper explores the strange dynamics behind the progresses, the role of the media in Korea and Japan in shaping public opinion...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Presentations will be primarily in Chinese. Song Binghui - Professor of Comparative Literature, Shanghai International Studies University Chen Xiaolan - Associate Professor of Comparative Literature, Shanghai University Zhang Yesong - Associate Professor of Chinese Literature, Fudan University Wang Yao - Professor of Chinese Language and Literature, Suzhou University Yan Feng - Associate Professor of Chinese Language and Literature, Fudan University Li Nan - Associate Professor of Chinese Literature, Fudan University Zhang Xinying - Professor of Chinese Literature, Fudan University Wang...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Feminist International Relations scholars have been claiming that both theories and the actual practice of international relations reflect gender. More specifically, these scholars claim that the underlying assumption that the international world consists of rational actors seeking to maximize power (and foreign policies based on this assumption) reflects male experiences and masculine ideals. In my lecture, I will reflect on this view by examining gender, masculinity in particular, in Japan and its foreign policy.

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