CEAS Colloquium Series

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

In her prose fiction, contemporary writer Sakiyama Tami focuses on a particular topos – the island – rendered shima in katakana, the syllabary reserved for things foreign. As her orthographic choice suggests, Sakiyama’s is a defamiliarized island that stands in stark contrast to widely circulated images of Okinawa, which appear in film, television, print journalism, and tourist brochures. Professor Bhowmik argue that Sakiyama’s method of writing through a dance of words destabilizes the very ground her texts seek to depict, creating instead an island freed from the romantic discourse of...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Japan recently instituted a comprehensive reform of its social pension system. This paper assesses how important these reforms are likely to be in resolving Japan’s fiscal woes. Professor Weinstein believes that the Koizumi reforms will be sufficient to prevent a fiscal crisis in Japan under many reasonable scenarios.

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Please note this lecture will be given in Chinese

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Sculpture was produced in large quantities over a long period of time in China as architectural ornaments, mortuary works, or objects of religious use. But sculpture was not often considered an object of special aesthetic value. The subject of the current research is the movement of Chinese sculpture, with special attention to Buddhist and Daoist works, from a category of non-art into one of the fine arts. In the process, a heretofore unknown kind of object and knowledge - something called “Chinese sculpture” as well as a history of this art form - came into being as modern facts. In this...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Please note this lecture will be given in Chinese

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Copies of The Rendez-Vous: Poems of Multicultural Experience (Peter Lang Publishing, August 2003) are currently available at The Yale Bookstore! A special book signing party will follow at The Yale Bookstore at 6:00 PM Barnes & Noble, 77 Broadway, New Haven, CT Telephone: (203) 777-8440

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

In authoritarian regimes, people learn to play it safe. Truth is a scarce commodity. Interviewees are people who have learned to be complicitous to survive. Memory is shaped and mis-shaped by all of these forces and more. Therefore learning the truth about the impact of politics and policy in a place like Mao’s China or even post-Mao China requires innovative approaches. This talk is about how such work was done over 3 dozen or so visits to rural China over a quarter of a century.

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

President George W. Bush has repeatedly presented the United States’ occupation of Japan as the model for Iraq’s democratization. Does the Japanese occupation illuminate contemporary reconstructions in Iraq, Afghanistan and other contemporary war-torn societies? Certain similarities do stand out: as in Japan half a century earlier, the US has proclaimed its intention to return “sovereignty” to a democratic Iraq while preserving a dominant American military presence. Yet beyond this obvious similarity lie profound differences in American strategy, goals and commitments, as well as in the...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

References to past painting are common, if not required, in cultures with established traditions of canonical masterworks and an active market for art. Such references require a consciousness of historical change, but do not require an awareness of historical relativity. A single moment in cultural time may serve as the universal standard for all generations. But what if we find multiple references from distinct historical moments in a single painting? What if we find illusionistic styles being used right alongside historically earlier, “pre-illusionistic” styles in a critical environment...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

What motived over 80 senior politicians and 80 senior staff to make an official visit on October 19, 2004 to one of Japan’s most controversial and important religious sites–Yasukuni Shrine? Although expressly prohibited by the postwar constitution, the current Prime Minister and his allies continue to make visits to express what they say is their “sincere desire for peace.” But what else is going on at this site? John Nelson’s talk will be accompanied by his new 25-minute film on the shrine made for university audiences. Using rare video footage from within the shrine–showing rituals carried...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Please note this lecture will be given in Chinese

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

The fountainhead of early Chinese migration to North America originated in the Pearl River delta of Guangdong Province. Up until 1960, more than half of the ethnic Chinese in the United States came from the small rural county of Taishan, located in the Pearl River delta. In recent years, the culture of the Pearl River delta (the culture of the Taishanese), referred to by Chinese scholars as Guangfu culture, has become an object of scholarship for a number of Chinese social scientists. Some recent Chinese studies have explored the cultural dimensions of issues such as Guangfu emigration and...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

With the foundation of the Liao state in the early tenth century, the Kitan became one of the major political forces in East Asia. While we have virtually no material record of the pre-dynastic Kitan, the new Liao aristocracy, right from the beginning, has left an impressive amount of the most sophisticated material relics, many of which were made by Chinese craftsmen and look Chinese. But recent discoveries also include ritual paraphernalia of a distinct Liao style. This lecture looks at some of the most striking of these latter artifacts, golden crowns, and discusses their design in...

Event
Posted : September 13, 2013

Xinjiang today is the focus of major development efforts, a source of gas and oil for the industries of eastern China, and the gateway to vigorous Chinese economic and diplomatic initiatives in Central Asia. It is also a locus of concern over separatist and terrorist activity, and a region where ambitious plans run up against stark environmental restraints. While some of these issues are new, many are not: the questions of Xinjiang’s commercial promise, agricultural development, ecological carrying capacity, ethnic character and, in general, the degree to which it is integration to China as a...

Pages

Subscribe to CEAS Colloquium Series